Crab Fishing in Norfolk

Crab & Lobster
Krebsfang in Norfolk

Hanne Siebers_Crab07_klein

When we went to the beach with our dear Master and Dina yesterday, we Bookfayries immediately had to fly to a fine white boat on the shingle bank next to a rusty tractor and an old Land Rover. This promised an adventure. 

Als wir gestern mit Dina und Masterchen an den Strand gingen, flatterten wir Buchfeen ganz aufgeregt voraus, denn wir sahen schon vom weiten ein feines Boot, einen rostigen großen Trecker und einen wohl ebenso alten Land Rover. Das versprach Abenteuer.

Crab06_klein

Our friend, the warden, was loading proudly with his son and a neighbour his new boat with crab pots, to catch crab and lobster. Since the 18th c. about 15% of all crabs and lobster catches in England and Wales are from our coast. Edmund Burdell in his book “A Guide About Cromer” was the first one who described traditional crab fishing, that was 1800. A crew of two is able to catch about 200 crabs daily, if they are lucky. In former times we had so many crabs and lobsters here, that in the 19th c. the servants of the big estates complained about their food consisting mostly of crab and lobster. But this has changed, today Cromer Crab is the runner here, it’s a dressed crab served in its shell.

Unser Freund, der Warden, belud mit seinem Sohn und einem befreundeten Dörfler stolz ihr neues Boot mit Crab Pots, das sind diese wie Käfig aussehenden Fangkörbe für Krebse und Hummer. Stellt euch vor seit dem 18. Jh. werden etwa 15% aller Krebse und Hummer in England und Wales an unserer Küste gefangen. Meistens fahren zwei Leute auf einem Boot, die so um die 200 Krebse am Tag fangen, wenn sie Glück haben. Es gab früher noch viel mehr Krebse und Hummer hier, so dass in 19. Jh. sich Angestellte der großen Güter beschwerten, dass sie immer nur Krebs und Hummer zu essen bekamen. Das hat sich natürlich geändert, heute avancierte die Cromer Crab, ein zum Essen fertiggemachter Krebs hier zum Nationalgericht, das in einer Krebsschale gereicht wird.

The fishermen go crabbing between March and the beginning of October placing their crab pots on the bottom of the sea up to 2 m seawards. They are using stinking fish as bait and get their pots up during the next high tide.The crab pots are used since 1862 before hoop nets were in use. Although crabbing is hard work we would have liked to go out with the warden, but our severe Master and even Dina forbade it because we neither had our waterproofs with us nor our little yellow life jackets. No grouching helped, nor arguing that we fairies can fly.A couple of weeks ago our dear Master gave us “The Lobster Chronicle” by Linda Greenlaw for a good read. Linda is great, we love her. She was the most successful captain catching sword fish. Our Master read of her in Sebastian Junger’s bestseller “The Perfect Storm” and immediately got her book “The Hungry Ocean”. Linda quit her job and became a lobster catcher following the tradition of her family on a small island of the American coast. But all the romantic of lobster catching was finished by the highly professional fishermen. This is not the case in North Norfolk. Lobster and crab catching is a dangerous business here but not as dangerous as in the Bering Sea. Together with our Master we read “Working on the Edge” by Spike Walker because our coast is called “The Edge” as well. We were shocked. Catching King Crabs off the coast of Alaska is the most dangerous job there is, which takes about 40 lifes every season of only one month. But this crabbing is a modern form of gold rush. Who survives 25-foot-seas and winds of 90 mph working on deck can make a fortune.   

Ab März bis zu Beginn des Oktobers fahren die Fischer hinaus, versenken ihre Fangkörbe auf den Meeresgrund bis zu etwa 3 km vom Land entfernt, die mit stinkigem Fisch als Köder versehen werden. Bei der nächsten Flut werden dann die mit Bojen markierten Körbe wieder hochgeholt.
Diese Fangkörbe wurden erst 1862 eingeführt, vorher fing man Hummer und Krebse mit hoop nets, also mit Netzen. Obwohl der Krebsfang eine schwere Arbeit ist, wären wir gerne mitgefahren, aber unser strenger Master und auch Dina sprachen ein Machtwort, da wir weder Friesenpelz noch Rettungsweste dabei hatten. Da half kein Quengeln, dass wir doch fliegen können. Dabei hatte uns Masterchen doch vor ein paar Wochen Linda Greenlaws Buch „Die Hummerchronik“ zum Lesen gegeben. Diese Linda Greenlaw finden wir eine ganz tolle Frau. Sie wurde in dem Weltbestseller „Der Sturm“ von Sebastian Junger erwähnt und war eine der erfolgreichsten Personen im Schwertfischfang, eine sympathische Kapitänin, die ihre Erfahrungen in „Das hungrige Meer“ schildert. Später wurde sie auf einer amerikanischen Insel gemäß der Tradition ihrer Familie zur Hummerfängerin. Allerdings wurde die Romantik des Hummerfangs auf ihrer Insel durch großorganisierte Fangeinheiten zerstört, was bei uns zum Glück nicht der Fall ist. Auch ist an der Küste Nord Nordfolks der Krebsfang nicht so gefährlich wie in der Beringsee. Wir lasen zusammen mit Masterchen das Buch von Spike Walker “Working on the Edge”, das uns Haare und Flügelchen zu Berge stehen ließ. Das Fangen der King Crabs in der Bering See ist der zur Zeit gefährlichste Beruf, der um die 40 Todesopfer in der kurzen Saison von einem Monat fordert. Diese Arbeit scheint uns wie ein moderner Goldrausch. Wer die etwa zehn Meter hohen Wellen bei Windstärken von 150 km/h auf Deck überlebt, kann erstaunlich viel Geld verdienen, allerdings muss man so etwas überleben können.

Crab_Collage

Our dear Master as well as our lovely Dina like the Cancer pagurus (the eatable crab) and the Homarus vulgaris (the lobster) very much. A friend of ours, a fisherman, provides us with those lobsters and crabs he cannot sell, because they don’t fulfil the norm size the reastaurants and fishmongers are asking for.
Crabbing is a favourite sport of children as well. They are catching crabs from the quays with a line and a bait of bacon. Not only the people eating crab are gourmets the crabs are as well, they prefer smoked bacon. These crabs are too small for eating and would taste awful, therefore they are kept in a bucket filled with seawater and at the end of the day they are set free by the excited children. This child is hero of the day whose crab is the first one to reach the water again. We always like to watch this crab race. We once had caught a crab we called “Howard”, but this was a very lazy one, she didn’t care reaching the sea again – and was eaten by a seagull in the end.

Masterchen und Dina lieben es, den Cancer pagurus (den essbare Krebs) und Homarus vulgaris (den Hummer) zu essen. Wir sind mit einem Fischer befreundet, so bekommen wir Hummer und Krebse ganz günstig, die nicht der Normgröße für den Verkauf an Buden und in Restaurants entsprechen. Und wisst was? Kinder fangen den ganzen Tag lang mit Leinen Krebse vom Kai in den Hafenorten hier. Als Köder wird Speck benutzt, allerdings werden Krebse nicht nur von Feinschmecker gegessen, sie sind auch selber welche, denn sie ziehen Räucherspeck vor. Die so gefangenen Krebse sind ganz klein und eignen sich nicht zu essen, deswegen kommen sie in einem Eimer mit Salzwasser. Am Ende des Tages schütten die Kinder sie ganz aufgeregt wieder am Ufer aus. Der ist der Held oder die Heldin des Tages, deren Krebs als erster das Wasser erreicht. Wir gucken da gerne zu. Wir hatten auch mal einen Hummer gefangen, den wir wie in der seichten Liebesgeschichte von Tanja Weckwerth „Ein Hummer macht noch keinen Sommer“ Howard genannt hatten, aber der war leider eine lahme Ente und wurde letztendlich von einer Möwe gefressen.

All the best
Liebe Grüße
Siri and Selma, the sometimes crabby Bookfayries😉

© text and pictures Hanne Siebers & Klausbernd Vollmar.

 

 

120 thoughts

  1. Lovely colourful and sharp photos as always Dina. As well as interesting and informative information about the crab and lobster industry.
    Such a pity that we lost the old Cromer Crab factory in 2011, with the work moved to Scotland and Grimsby. It is now even more important to support the small fisherman, like the one featured in your excellent article.
    Best wishes as always, from Beetley. Pete and Ollie. X

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Pete,
      thanks for your kind commentary🙂
      You are right, unfortunately we lost the Cromer Crab factory, nevertheless Cromer Crab is still a trademark everyone knows and all the tourists are mad about it. But we liken eating dressed crabs as well. Unfortunately it’s a bit overfished here so that the catches are going back. And you made the point it’s very important to support the small fisherman who can hardly live on fishing anymore. Besides crabbing is quite an unhealthy job: hard work and always wet and cold so that many fishermen get severe back problems, rheumatism and you name it.
      The local fishermen started a fishermen’s collective in Weyborne many years ago. You can see their boats and tractors at the beach car park.
      All the best to you and Ollie xx
      Klausbernd, Dina and our happy Bookfayries Siri and Selma

      Like

  2. My dear Dina and Klausbernd,
    to catch crabs is a big event here in Sweden, at the lakes and the sea shores. Actually the event is not so much the catching, but the big dinner afterwards.
    Do you remember our big crab dinner at my summer house? Well, a bit formal it was. These were different times, long, long ago.
    I wish you a great weekend my dear friends.
    With lots of love from Stockholm
    Your friend Annalena

    Like

    • Good afternoon, my dear friend,
      yes, I remember well the big dinner celebrating the first crabs. When I lived in Smaland in my childhood we were always very excitet to catch crabs in the lakes, with smoked bacon as well. But going in the water pushing our boat out I was a bit afraid every time that a crab would pinch my toes.
      We are sending lots of love from Norfolk to Stockholm
      the Fab Four
      Kb🙂

      Like

    • My dear Annalena,
      we thank you very much for reblogging🙂 Siri and Selma feel honoured and they are very, very happy.
      Have a great weekend and don’t work too much
      Klausbernd and Siri & Selma
      Dina has gone to Bonn just after taking these photographs.

      Like

  3. My dear friends,
    what a great article!🙂 Thanks for all the information and the stunning pictures as well. Reading this blog I had the feeling of being with you at Cley beach. I have to visit you again, Cley is such a great place for everybody who likes nature.
    Have a nice weekend
    Per Magnus

    Like

    • Dear Per Magnus,
      thanks for your kind commentary🙂
      Come around, call in, you are very welcome here🙂
      When I was visiting my friends at the pottery an hour ago the Smokehouse got a load of quite big lobsters. They are affordable here as well as the crabs although their price is rising, but well, every price is rising …
      I suppose you have crabs in Svalbard as well, haven’t you?
      All the best and lots of love to you and your son
      Klausbernd, Dina, Siri and Selma

      Like

  4. Well, I must confess, I like the dressed crabs we eat in Norfolk, but sorry dear Siri and Selma, and Klausbernd too – they cannot compete with the big crabs I know from Norway. The bigger crabs have a more sophisticated, delicate meat and the claws are full of juicy meat as well. But… the price is not appetizing though…, they cost a fortune. Kongekrabben, the king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus), I think it’s also called red king crab is a very big business for the Norwegian crab fishers, but these crabs are actually more or less banned or rather blacklisted from the Norwegian authorities as they are native to the Bering Sea and Alaska and not the Norwegian waters.
    The red king crab is the most coveted of the commercially sold king crab species, and is the most expensive per unit weight. It is particularly difficult to catch, but is nonetheless one of the most preferred crabs for consumption.
    Red king crabs are experiencing a steady decline in numbers in their native far east coastal waters for unclear reasons. Fishing controls set by the United States in the 1980s and 2000s have failed to stem the decline.
    In the Barents Sea, however, it is an invasive species and its population is increasing tremendously. This is causing great concern to local environmentalists and local fishermen as the crab eats everything it comes across and is spreading very rapidly. Since its introduction it has spread westwards along the Norwegian coast and also northwards, having reached the island group of Svalbard. The species keeps on advancing southwards along the coast of Norway and some scientists think they are advancing at about 50 km (31 mi) a year, though that could be an underestimation. Despite these concerns the species is protected by diplomatic accords between Norway and Russia, and a bilateral fishing commission decides how to manage the stocks and imposes fishing quotas. West of the North Cape on Norway’s northern tip, the Scandinavian country is allowed to manage its crab population itself. Only 259 Norwegian fishermen are allowed to catch it, and they see the king crab as a blessing, as it is an expensive delicacy.
    Big hug to you all!
    Dina

    Liked by 1 person

    • Well, well, dear Dina,
      you write about a different kind of crab, the Paralithodes camtschaticus. As their name is pointing out their natural habutat is Kamtschatka and the Bering Sea. Our crabs here are very small in comparison, they could be their children😉 and they are affordable! And, as you wrote, tasty as well.
      Siri and Selma fight for the honour of the Cromer Crab. After reading your comment they are producing big banners “We like Cromer Crabs”. They want to put them up in front of our hedge at Church Lane. I don’t know if I should allow this.
      Anyway, we wish you a happy weekend.
      With many kisses xxxxxx from
      Klausbernd, Siri and Selma

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ich finde, ihr seid alle Vier großartige Botschafter für Norfolk und Norwegen! Wir lieben Krebse!🙂 Kommt ihr zu Buchmesse nach Frankfurt?
      Herzliche Grüße, Ursel

      Like

    • Liebe Ursel,
      schön, von dir zu lesen🙂
      habe vielen, vielen Dank!🙂
      Nein, ich werde nicht zur Buchmesse nach Frankfurt kommen. Nach 40 Jahren eifrigen Buchmessenbesuchs fragte ich mich schon in den letzten Jahren, warum ich mir diesen Stress antue. Klar, man fühlt sich als Autor richtig wichtig dort, wird gesehen und gekannt, trifft viele Freunde aus aller Welt, aber die Geschäfte, der Verkauf der Auslandsrechte, geschehen heute per E-Mail. Die Anzahl der Entscheidungsträger, die in Frankfurt erscheinen, nimmt auch ab. Im Zeitalter des Netzes ist die Frankfurter Buchmesse unwichtiger geworden. Es ist schade, sehr schade, dass ich euch nicht mehr sehe, was ich bedaure. Aber ich werde sicherlich auch so noch mal nach Frankfurt kommen. Außerdem bin zur Zeit mehr Blogger als Buchautor, was sich allerdings auch wieder ändern könnte. Aber typisch ist ja, dass ich meinen letzten Roman “Tantes Tod” http://www.amazon.de/Tantes-Tod-ebook/dp/B00D1V9TG6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1376227393&sr=8-1&keywords=Vollmar+Tantes+Tod (hier könnt ihr ihn übrigens lesen) als eBook veröffentlichte. Für solche Veröffentlichungen benötige ich die Buchmesse nicht mehr.
      Dina und ich werden im Herbst in die schottischen Highlands zum Wandern fahren. Well, das tut uns besser😉
      Ganz liebe Grüße an dich und Herbert
      Klausbernd🙂

      Like

  5. Liebe Buchfeen,
    ihr scheint ja in einem Urlaubsparadies zu wohnen! Ich hätte gedacht, solch eine Umgebung wird auf Dauer leicht langweilig, aber ihr scheint ein ganz abenteuerliches Dasein zu fristen.😉
    Welch ein interessanter Aspekt Dina in ihr Kommentar anführt! Luxusrestaurants auf der ganzen Welt bieten das wertvolle Krebsfleisch an, ich wusste gar nicht das es soooo teuer ist and soooo schwer zu fangen ist. Und gefährlich! Was ist denn das besonders Gefährliche daran? Das Buch von Spike Walker werde ich mir holen, vielen Dank für die Empfehlung.
    Liebe Grüße zum Wochenende
    Jürgen

    Like

    • Lieber Jürgen,
      nee, langweilig ist es gar nicht hier, “nicht die Bohne”, wie Siri und Selma zu sagen pflegen.
      Bei der Gefährlichkeit des Krebsfangs müssen wir zwischen Bering See und Cley unterscheiden. Fangen wir hier an der Küste Nord Norfolks an.
      Der gefährlichste Punkt ist das Boot ins Wasser zu bringen. Wie du auf dem Bild siehst, geschieht das vom Strand aus. Dabei ist die Gefahr bei stärkerem Seegang (als auf Dinas Fotos) groß, dass das Boot umschlägt und ein Fischer unter das Boot gelangt und nicht mehr herauskommen kann, da er bewusstlos ist oder das Boot ihn gefangen hält. Auf See ist die große Gefahr, ebenfalls bei rauer See, dass man sich wie Ahab in Melvilles “Moby Dick” in den Seilen verfängt. Du musst dir vorstellen, dass der Boden des Boots auf dem Bild voller Seile ist, an denen die Crab pots hängen. Der häufigste Unfall ist, dass Seile so schnell ablaufen, dass sie Finger abschneiden. Du siehst auf den Fotos, dass es auf den Booten keine elektrischen Winden gibt, d.h. das Heben der crab pots geschieht mit Muskelkraft. Ich finde es erstaunlich, dass dabei nicht mehr Fischer über Bord gehen.
      In der Beringsee ist nicht nur die Königskrabbe weitaus größer so auch die Fangschiffe und Fangkörbe. Hier wird bei Orkan und bis zu zehn Meter hohen Wellen an Deck gearbeitet. Dabei ist schon jede Arbeit hochgefährlich. Dazu kommen noch mächtige Gewichte an elektrischen Winden, die bei den Krängungen des Bootes unkontrollierbar herumschwanken. Alles schwankt über Deck und dazu kommt noch das enorme Tempo, mit dem man Fangkörbe beködert, auswirft und hochholt. Eigentlich gibt es auf solch einem Fangschiff keinen Handgriff, der nicht höchst gefährlich ist. Ich habe bislang nur acht Meter hohe Wellen in der Arktis erlebt. Bei diesem Wellengang war es mir nicht möglich, selbst im Boot mich auf den Beinen zu halten. Dabei auf Deck zu arbeiten, wenn dazu noch Brecher über Bord gehen, ist mir unvorstellbar.
      Liebe Grüße vom kleinen Dorf am großen Meer
      Klausbernd
      Dina, Siri & Selma lassen auch grüßen
      🙂🙂🙂

      Like

    • Ganz, ganz herzlichen Dank für die ausführliche Antwort, Klausbernd! Das hört sich mächtig gefährlich an!. Warst du auch auf Fischfang in der Arktis oder warum warst du dort?
      LG Jürgen

      Like

    • Lieber Jürgen,
      ich war öfters in der Arktis und Hoch-Arktis, zuletzt in Nordost-Grönland. Auf meinem alten Blog findest du Artikel dazu
      http://kbvollmarblog.wordpress.com/2013/07/19/ultima-thule/ und dann die nächsten 3 Artikel, von meiner letzte Expedition nach NO-Grönland findest du Fotos und Text hier http://kbvollmarblog.wordpress.com/2012/08/17/reise-ins-eis-1-teil/ und der übernächste Artikel dort bringt den zweiten Teil.
      Nee, nee, ich bin nicht Manns genug, um in der Arktis zu fischen oder gar mich mit crabbing abzumühen. Ich bin ein Arktis-Fan, für mich ist das die bei weitem schönste Gegend in der Welt. Meine Liebe zur Arktis und wie ich dazu kam, beschreibe ich in meinem Roman “Tantes Tod”, den du hier http://www.amazon.de/Tantes-Tod-ebook/dp/B00D1V9TG6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1376227393&sr=8-1&keywords=Vollmar+Tantes+Tod lesen kannst.
      Neben Germanistik und Nordistik habe ich Geowissenschaften studiert und mich auf die Physik des Eises spezialisiert, weswegen ich auf solchen Expeditionen gern mitgenommen werde. Heute liegt jedoch mein Interesse mehr auf der symbolischen Bedeutung der Arktis und der Expeditionsgeschichte.
      Die Bering See ist noch Reiseziel von mir, das ich jedoch bislang noch nicht besuchen konnte, da leider solche Reisen wie z.B. die NO-Passage sauteuer sind. Da brauchte ich einen Sponsor, um mir das leisten zu können.
      Hab ein rundum feines Wochenende
      Klausbernd
      P.S.
      Wenn du das Buch über Crabbing in der Bering See liest, vergeht dir womöglich die Lust, je dort hin zu fahren😉
      Es gibt auch im Netz irgendwo ein paar Filme über die Fischer in der Beringsee, ich habe vergessen wo. Ich glaube, du findest sie auf youtube.

      Like

    • Lieber Klausbernd,
      habe vielen Dank für die Links und die ausführliche Antwort auf meinem Kommentar! Ist “Tantes Tod” als ein autobiographischer Roman zu verstehen?
      Ich habe kein Ebookreader, wie funktioniert das, kann man ein Ebook nur auf einem Reader laden?
      Eine gute Woche,
      Jürgen

      Like

    • Lieber Jürgen,

      puh, jetzt bin ich völlig ko, weil ich seit heute Morgen meine Hecke im Sonnenschein geschnitten habe.

      “Tantes Tod” ist teilweise autobiographisch, naja, Dichtung und Wahrheit, mehr Dichtung als Wahrheit. Aber die Einstellung zur Arktis des Protagonisten (Gerrit) dort entspricht schon meiner. Die krimihafte Handlung ist völlig fiktiv.
      Du brauchst keinen eBook Reader, um den Roman herunterzuladen und zu lesen. Die ersten 30 Seiten kannst du auch online hier
      http://www.neobooks.com/werk/21307-tantes-tod.html lesen.
      Das ist der Inhalt in Kürze: Eigentlich passt es Gerrit gut, als ihm der Anwalt seiner in der Ölbranche reich gewordenen Tante, die seit einiger Zeit verschwunden ist, anbietet, auf ihre Kosten in deren Haus in einem idyllischen Küstenort in England zu leben. Er hat sich nämlich gerade von seiner Frau getrennt und ist mit seinem Dasein als Literaturprofessor unzufrieden. Zudem winkt ihm als Belohnung ein guter Teil des Vermögens seiner Tante, wenn er einen Roman für sie schreibt und ihre Bibliothek ordnet. Dass zu den Bedingungen ferner eine Heirat gehört, stört ihn schon eher. In England trifft er auf skurrile Verhaltensweisen, seltsame Ansichten und auf attraktive Frauen. Vor allem aber wird er mit dem Gerücht konfrontiert, seine Tante sei Opfer skrupelloser Ölfirmen geworden, da sie aus ökologischen Gründen gegen eine Ausbeutung arktischer Ölvorkommen gearbeitet habe. Einige merkwürdige Vorkommnisse und seine Nachforschungen bestärken Gerrit in dem Gefühl, selbst ins Visier der Ölmafia geraten zu sein. Oder ist das Ganze nichts als eine Inszenierung seiner Tante, mit der er unlängst eine interessante, aber nicht ungefährliche Arktis-Reise unternommen hat? Will sie ihn an unsichtbaren Fäden in ein neues Leben ziehen?

      Ich wünsche dir, dass du auch solch märchenhaftes Wetter hast.
      Liebe Grüße und eine fröhliche Woche
      Klausbernd

      Like

    • Nachtrag
      Entschuldige, ich vergaß noch eine deiner Fragen zu beantworten.
      Du kannst “Tantes Tod” z.B. als pdf auf deinen Rechner laden und dann auch mit anderen teilen. Wie das mit eBook Readern geht, weiß ich nicht, da ich nämlich auch keinen besitze.

      Like

    • Danke für die Antwort, Klausbernd. Ich werde es bei neobooks anlesen so bald ich ich etwas mehr Luft habe. Wenn das Buch groß rauskommt, ist es wahrscheinlich das Ende der idyllischen Ruhe im kleinen Fischerdorf…🙂
      Kennst du “A river runs through it” von Norman MacLean? Ein großartiges Buch. Es gibt auch ein preisgekrönter Film mit Robert Redford, auf Deutsch: “Aus der Mitte entspringt ein Fluss”. Buch + Film führen jährlich anderthalb Millionen Angler aus der ganzen Welt nach Montana.🙂
      Herzliche Grüße!
      Jürgen

      Like

    • Hi lieber Jürgen,
      ich weiß nicht warum, aber aus irgend einem Grund bist du bei uns mit diesem Kommentar im Spam gelandet, dort habe ich dich gerade rausgefischt.🙂
      ich habe den Klassiker von N. Maclean und den Film habe ich sicherlich zweimal gesehen! Der erste Satz hat es auf meiner Bestenliste geschafft : “In our family, there was no clear line between religion and fly fishing”.
      Der letzte Satz ist auch nicht schlecht, “I am haunted by waters”.😉
      Liebe Grüße nach Frankfurt, schöne Ostertage dir!
      Dina

      Like

    • Lieber Jürgen,
      in der Sonne sitzend auf der Terrasse mit einem Drink – very civilised, indeed😉 – kommt meine Antwort: Zu dem Buchtipp, finde ich sehr spannend, danke, hat ja Dina bereits geschrieben. Well, zum “Groß rauskommen” … oh dear, ich bin in Cley umgeben von Autoren, die groß herausgekommen sind. Wenn dich das literarische Leben hier interessiert, dann kann ich sehr das Buch und die Website “Literary Norfolk” empfehlen.
      Und schreibst du mir bitte, wie dir zumindest der Anfang meines Romans gefällt – aber EHRLICH, bitte🙂
      Liebe Grüße vom kleinen Dorf am großen Meer
      Klausbernd

      Like

  6. Dear crabby Bookfayries,
    I agree with Ursel, you are wonderful ambassadors for Norfolk!
    We love to eat crab and although I sympathize a little with Dina, I think you should be allowed to put up your banner in front of the hedge. Go ahead!🙂🙂
    Love, kisses and hugs, Tone og gutta xx

    Like

    • Hi, dear Tone,
      oh dear, Siri and Selma are already out there. I am pretty sure they will get their banners up. If I wouldn’t allow it they would get very, very crabby.
      Pete is right, we have to support our local fishermen.
      With lots of love
      Klausbernd🙂

      Like

  7. I used to go crabbing when I was a kid (on Broad Channel – the island I was born on) and I can eat my weight in seafood. Those fishermen would make a fortune off of me! Beautiful pictures! GP Cox

    Like

    • Thank you very much.
      When I was a kid I loved crabbing in the lakes of Sweden. It was great fun. I love seafood as well and live at the right place to get it quite reasonably.
      Have a happy weekend.
      All the best
      The Fab Four
      Kb🙂

      Like

    • Dear Hans,
      thank you so much for your kind commentary🙂 You made Siri and Selma very happy.
      I am a great fan of everything having to do with the sea from pirates to crabbing😉
      I tried fishing but I have to say that was a desaster: the fishing line got caught in the propeller regularly and I never caught one fish. Good for the marine life😉
      All the best.
      Greetings from Norfolk
      Klausbernd🙂

      Like

  8. Interesting as ususal – I get more educated every time! And the photos are of course top class, Dina! Now, crabbing was popular in Sweden in the 60’s and 70’s when my husband used to engage in it. You too, Clausbernd, it seems! Unfortunately first the pest caught the crabs and what was left was outconquered by an American crab being planted in our lakes and rivers. So…now we buy Turkish…

    Like

    • Dear Leya,
      Oh dear, I didn’t know about this desaster. There were so many crabs in the Swedish lakes when I was a child. It’s very sad to hear this.
      Thanks for telling us.
      Have a happy weekend
      Klausbernd and the other 3 of us

      Like

  9. Liebe “Fab Four”, Danke euch allen für diesen kurzweiligen wie historisch informativen Ausflug und den interessanten Buchtipp. Gut, das ihr so nah dran seit und damit einen besseren Einblick habt. Es schadet nicht, sich vor Augen zu führen, welchen Weg und Aufwand ein Lebensmittel zurück gelegt hat, bis es auf dem Teller liegt. Danke auch Klausbernd für Deine Ausführungen in einem Kommentar samt Links zu früheren Blogbeiträgen.
    Liebe Grüße aus dem Norden ins kleine Dorf am großen Meer
    Stefan

    Like

    • Lieber Stefan,
      es ist erstaunlich, wie viele Mühe es kostet, die Lebensmittel bereitzustellen. Ich wundere mich auch immer wieder darüber. Wenn wir sie genießen, vergessen wir oft die Arbeit, die es kostete, unsere Essen auf den Teller zu finden. Wären wir uns dessen bewusst, würden wir sicher bewusster essen und vor allen Dingen nicht so viele Lebensmittel vergeuden.
      Ganz liebe Grüße in Deutschlands Norden
      Klausbernd
      Liebe Grüße auch von Dina und Siri & Selma

      Like

  10. Oh, you mischievous bookfayries, you seem to have gone ahead with your banner anyway! Too much time on your hands it seems, but for a very good cause. We should all support our local producers. Sadly there aren’t many crabs here in Shropshire as it is a landlocked county, but we have good local beef (Herefords) and lamb and even wild venison from the forests. It’s hard work eating all this food though…
    Jude xx

    Like

    • Dear Jude,
      your beef has a very high reputation here as well. I think we once have to visit Shropshire – we have never been there – because I love wild venison. August and winter is right time, I suppose.
      Well, our Bookfayries are always very, very busy and if they get an idea they immediately have to work it out. That seems to be fairy like, I suppose.
      Greetings from the other side of England
      Klausbernd

      Like

  11. I saw one of those Alaskan crab-fishing specials…it really looked dangerous! I had no idea about the crabs in England coming from Norway…interesting…

    Like

    • No, not at all, our crabs are local, real English crabs. Here no one even thinks of eating Norwegian crabs and I never saw them in the shops. We love our Cromer crabs!
      The Alaskan crab fishing is really a deadly business.
      Thanks and enjoy the weekend
      The Fab Four
      Kb🙂

      Like

    • Dear Sue,
      never mind.
      Do you know what? Siri and Selma really like your Gravatar🙂
      We wish you a sunny Sunday
      the Fab Four of Cley
      Kb
      🙂🙂🙂🙂

      Like

    • Dear Kerry,
      our beloved Bookfayries are very good doing those things, especially Selma is very clever with her hands.
      Thanks for your kind commentary. We wish you a sunny Sunday.
      All the best
      the Fab Four of Cley
      Kb🙂

      Like

  12. Crabbing for fun … oh yes children ..small and large love it ! To see the little crabs race down back into the water out of the bucket at Blakeney was a highlight of the afternoon .. oh happy days ..
    Super pictures Dina … and lots of extra info too of course Klaus😉

    Like

    • Dear Poppy,
      your name has a great Norfolk connection, indeed!😉
      Walking to Blakeney we love to watch the children and their parents crabbing and then the crab race – much better than the rat race, isn’t it😉
      With love from Poppy Land and thanks for commenting
      Klausbernd and Dina

      Like

  13. Hallo, gerade war ich im Nationaltheater, Kevin hat Probenszenen zu seinem neuen Stück “Kammerspiele” gezeigt…..wird sehr toll (mit etwas Backgroundwissen: supertoll)
    Danke für den supertollen Artikel und die Fotos, habe über den Krebsnebel, den musikalischen Kontrapunkt gegoogelt und bin wieder mehr im Bilde!
    Wie alles mit allem zusammenhängt…..
    Hunger! Hummer gibt es heute nicht, aber sicher findet sich etwas im Kühlschrank!
    Herzliche sonnige Grüße von Pia

    Like

  14. Hi, liebe Pia,
    auch bei uns gibt’s heute weder Hummer noch Krebs, ach, eigentlich weiß ich noch gar nicht, was ich mit Siri und Selma kochen kann. Aber die praktische Selma hat stets gute Ideen nach einem kurzen Blick in den Kühlschrank. Siri schreibt gerade über die englischen Romantiker im Lake District, worüber wir das nächste Mal bloggen werden.
    Es ist ja interessant, dass Krebs im Deutschen so vieldeutig ist, im Englischen wird zwischen CANCER und CRAB unterschieden, allerdings ist CANCER wiederum zweideutig, da es das Sternzeichen wie die Krankheit bedeutet.
    Tschüß🙂
    Hab noch einen Sonntag.
    Herzliche Grüße an dich und die Kids
    the Fab Four
    Kb🙂
    Die arme Dina ist gleich krank geworden, als sie nach Deutschland zurückkam. Sie liegt mit Grippe im Bett, lässt aber lieb grüßen.

    Like

    • Gute Besserung, liebe Dina! …und nochmal ganz liebe Grüße nach Cley!
      …. als wir am Strand waren hat wirklich nie jemand etwas gefangen, dabei beißen doch die Fische besser bei Regen…irgendwann dachte ich, die kommen einfach zur Entspannung zum Fischen….
      Bei den fischenden Kindern am Pier wurde mir etwa mulmig….etwas grausam diese Art zu fischen, als wären Fische etwas zum Spielen….das war aber nur mein ganz persönlicher Eindruck….(wir haben den Angelschein, damit wir lecker Forellen angeln können im Odenwald…)
      Jonas und ich haben gestern noch 3 große Bücherregale gekauft, wir freuen uns schon auf neue Literaturempfehlungen!

      Like

    • Guten Abend, liebe Pia,

      ich glaube auch, die meisten Angler am Strand angeln zur Entspannung und vielleicht auch, um von der Familie einmal wegzukommen. Am Meer hängt es von den Tiden und der Jahreszeit ab, wie die Fische kommen. Manchmal fangen die Angler Unmengen und dann wieder wochenlang nichts.
      Der Krebs als Spielzeug, auf diese Idee bin ich noch gar nicht gekommen. Krebsfischende Kinder ist ein so alltäglicher Anblick hier, so normal, dass mir der Aspekt noch nie aufgefallen ist. Zumindest werden meistens die Krebse nicht verletzt und vielleicht haben ja auch sie eine nette Auszeit in den Eimern der Kinder, bis sie wieder gegen Möwen und Seeschwalben ihren Überlebenskampf aufnehmen müssen.

      Ach, weißt du, Bücherregale haben die Angewohnheit, sich viel zu schnell wieder zu füllen.
      Ich las gerade ein unterhaltsames Buch von Penelope Fitzgerald “offshore”, die für diesen Roman vor nicht ganz 20 Jahren den Booker Prize bekam. Das Buch ist aber, glaube ich, nicht ins Deutsche übersetzt worden. Ansonsten lese ich gerade von T.C. Boyle “Talk Talk”, ein Roman, bei dem man Angst bekommen kann, dass einem seine Identität gestohlen wird. Wenn du ihn nicht kennst, kann ich dir sehr T.C. Boyles ersten Roman “Wassermusik” empfehlen, den es auch als Hörbuch gibt.

      Ganz liebe Grüße aus dem sonnig warmen Cley
      Klausbernd🙂

      Like

    • Vielen Dank, liebe Pia, für deine Genesungswünsche!
      Heute geht’s mir viel besser, aber noch nicht richtig gut. Weißt du was? Ich bin richtig froh, dass du diesen Aspekt der Krabbe fischen angesprochen hast. Ich war verblüfft als ich es zum ersten mal sah. Ich frage mich, ob das an der Küste in Deutschland auch so üblich ist? Oder würden Tierschützer sich wehren? In England ist es so alltäglich und überall an jedem Seebad oder Fischerdorf kann man neben Ansichtskarten, Sonnencreme und Wanderrouten auch Krabbenfangenvollausrüstungen für die Kleinen kaufen. So lange wie man keine Haken benutzt scheint es den Krabben nicht besonders viel auszumachen, aber unter uns; ich bin jemand der sich immer überlegt wie Tiere und Insekten etwas empfinden, also wäre ich eine Krabbe, hätte ich Angst bekommen! Und wäre bestimmt unter den ersten zurück ins große Meer!🙂
      Einen guten Start in der neuen Woche wünscht dir aus Bonn
      Dina

      Like

    • Aha! Gut, dass ich nachgefragt habe….danke, da ist also gar kein Haken daran! Anders als das Fische quälen, das ich leider im Indischen Ozean als Touribelustigung mitanschauen “musste”….
      Danke für die Buchempfehlungen und weiter gute Besserung für die liebe Dina

      Like

    • Na dann! Das lag wohl daran, dass wir einzelne Schilder nach 5 Tagen London nicht mehr wahr nahmen. Mind the Crab!
      Bin leider manchmal ein Blindfisch!
      Herzliche Grüße!

      Like

    • Guten Tag, liebe Pia,
      es gibt einfach zu viele Hinweisschilder, die liebe Selma nennt das “sign pollution”😉
      Wir wünschen dir noch einen sonnigen und fröhlichen Tag
      Die Drei aus Cley

      Like

  15. Thank you for capturing an iconic moment by the sea. Dina – your photos are marvelous. You live in an amazing, joyful community Your post reminded me of the the book “Salt: A World History” by Mark Kurlansky, which goes into great detail on how salt was the way in which fish were preserved. One of the ending lines was something to the effect that in the past, fish were plentiful, while salt was difficult to locate, mine, acquire etc. In our time, salt is plentiful, but fish are hard to find. I have a reverence for those who take to the sea. I admire their courage and resourcefulness. They embrace danger every time they sail into open waters.

    I could smell the sea, feel the warmth of the sun and the cool breeze against my cheek. Big hugs coming from across the waters to the Fab Four!

    Like

    • Dear Rebecca,
      what a lovely, truly inspiring comment coming from you in beautiful Vancouver!
      First of all, thanks you so much for introducing Mark Kurlansky to us, he’s new to me and I must confess, I got absolutely absorbed into his work as I started reading. Now I have put all his non-fiction books on my list, not only “Salt” but also “Cod, The Basque History of the World”, “The Big Oyster” and his newest book, “Birdseye.” I am drawn to history and Kurlansky takes us on an incredible journey through the centuries by the way of salt, fish, birds and the origin of food. I didn’t know that Kurlansky is rated as one of the great food writers . Great!!! You do a masterful job of expanding our horizons, Rebecca!🙂

      Living in Cley is great, tranquil (except in the summer season), peaceful and joyful. I do not live there permanently, but I feel at home there. Hope the new week started well for you and yours, Rebecca.
      Big hug from the four of us in Bonn and Cley
      Dina xo

      Like

    • Hello, dear Rebecca,
      you are so right, being a fisherman needs quite some courage and funnily enough hardly any fisherman can swim. On the other hand swimming wouldn’t save him as the current is very strong here.
      I read in Schätzing’s “The Swarm” – a great novel of a German writer from Cologne – that at your coast you have orcas. The novel starts with orca watching, if I remember it correctly.
      Great, that you like our post. Well, one day you have to come over and visit us🙂
      We are sending you lots of love across the big waters and a continent as well – here it comes xxx ooo
      Klausbernd and his busy Bookfayries Siri and Selma

      Like

    • And you expand my horizons with every post, comment, thought, idea, challenge, reflection, suggestion! Ah, my dear friends, it is a joyful honour to walk this world with you! There are many adventures still to come – so glad that I am connected to the Fabulous Four!❤ Hugs from across the ocean. Welcome to another week.

      Like

  16. Das ist ja wirklich wundervoll, dass bei euch vor der Haustüre Krabben und Hummer gefangen werden. Davon kann man an der Ostsee natürlich nur träumen. Eure Bilder dokumentieren das Krabbenfischen auf sehr schöne Weise. Habt einen wunderbaren Tag!
    Liebe Grüße.😉

    Like

    • Vielen Dank, du Liebe! 😊 Ich hätte da gleich eine Frage, du kommst ja sehr viel rum an der Küste, nicht nur an der Ostsee: Kennst du diese Kinder-Sommer-an-der-Küste-Beschäftigung mit Krabben fangen von irgendwo? In England gehört es zu jedem Küstenort. Jeder noch so kleiner Zeitungsladen verkauft auch kleine Plastikeimer und alles was die Minimäuschen zu Krabbenfangen benötigen. Aus Skandinavien kenne ich das nicht, Kleine Krabben gibt’s genug.
      Deine Rezepte sind megaverführerisch, 👍 in Cley haben wir bereits einige Sachen von dir ausprobiert und auch Gäste serviert. Ich sage dann immer, das Rezept habe ich von “All shall be well”. Das kommt in der Gegend gut an.🙂
      Ha en god uke!🙂 🙋
      ønsker vi fire deg,
      Dina, Klausbernd, Siri & Selma 👭

      Like

    • Also dass Kinder an der Küste Krabben fischen, habe ich noch nirgends gehört, geschweige denn, dass dafür extra Utensilien verkauft werden. Das freut mich sehr, dass den Gästen die Sachen so gut geschmeckt haben.😉
      Ha en fin fin uke, dere også!🙂

      Like

    • Hi, du Liebe,
      ich habe sogar mehrere Crabbing Ausrüstungen für Kinder hier, die mit ihren Eltern zu Besuch kommen. Mich fasziniert das immer, wie Kinder den ganzen Tag aufgeregt Krebse fangen können. Übrigens ist das gar nicht so einfach, sie die Kaimauer hochzuziehen. Sie hängen ja nur an dem Räucherspeck und bei einer unvorsichtigen Bewegung lassen sie los und fallen wieder zurück ins Meer.
      Liebe Grüße aus dem frühsommerlichen Cley next the Sea
      Klausbernd

      Like

  17. I’m so glad to learn of a place where lobsters and crabs are harvested using traditional methods. How nice it must be to line in an area that close to the ocean, where these delicacies are abundant. This was another fascinating post, with photography that reveals that tells its own story of the area and its people. I do not know how those fisherman can go out, into the Bering Sea, to catch king crab. Yes, there is plenty of money to be made but at what cost? It’s far too high for me. Thank you for writing and sharing this beautiful post with us.

    Like

    • Dear John,
      I cannot understand these tough men going out into the Bering Sea for Crab fishing neither. I suppose I would die on such a boat. Well, they are desperados like the gold diggers wer, a very special kind of folks.
      It’s great living here and we are hoping that we are saved from mass tourism. Well, we got a law passed that no big road runs into our area and that all tiny roads are not made bigger. That helps a lot.
      Thanks for your kind comment.
      All the best
      Klausbernd and Dina, Siri & Selma

      Like

  18. Tough one for me! I don’t eat fish so I sympathize with the poor crabs and lobsters. More for the crabs because they are so cute/funny looking.
    Wonderful pics, Dina! I can smell the sea!🙂

    Like

    • Oh, what a pity, dear Francesca, North Norfolk would be the wrong place for you – crabs, lobster, mussels and wet fish are the goodies here.
      The crabs are cute indeed. I am always stunned by their funny eyes and how they move …
      Lots of love to you, Stefano and your little princess and the doggy
      Klausbernd and the funny Bookfayries Siri and Selma

      Like

  19. Here on Kiawah crabbing is quite a fun sport for young people. They use strings with horrific spoiled chicken on the end and when the crab bites the chicken they pull it up and put it in a basket. when they have enough they have dinner! It’s also a very large local industry and there are crab pots owned by commercial enterprises all along our creeks and bays. Never heard of Comer crabs though, which Im sure are very delicious!! Loved your photos and also the red banners Keep Crabs Comer – lovely post Dina!

    Like

  20. Dear Tina,
    fortunately we have no big crab industry at the North Norfolk coast (we have no industry here at all, it’s a big nature reserve). Crabbing is still in the hand of individual fishermen, the crew is quite often family who has a long tradition going crabbing. These little Gilly Crabs, which the children are catching with their bacon, are not edible. On Kiawah the youngsters seem to catch another kind of crab, which is quite much bigger, I suppose. I just saw in the net pictures of the Kiawah crabs and I was amazed how many restaurants offer crabs. In North Norfolk everything is small, it’s a rural area. Most of the people living here don’t want to be bothered by tourism. Well, that’s good old England.
    We wish you a fine day
    Klausbernd and the other three from Cley next the Sea

    Like

  21. I come from Kings Lynn, not too far away from where you took these photos. Crab fishing in Cromer was a great part of my childhood, great to see families today are still carrying on the tradition!

    Like

    • Dear Sam,
      it’s makes me always happy seeing the the children lined up at Blakeney quay in summer time catching gilly crabs. The children and their parents like it, they getting really excited. This tradition is quite lively here. Every shop sells the crab catching equippment still. Wells is another famous place for catching those crabs too.
      Kings Lynn is a very special town for me, such a clear border between Norfolk and the flat Fens.
      All the best
      Klausbernd
      Greetings from Dina and our beloved Bookfayries too, who can go mad catching crabs too

      Like

  22. Liebe Dina, lieber Klausbernd,

    Euren wunderbar bebilderten anschaulichen Bericht über den Krabbenfang hab ich gespannt gelesen und wieder etwas dazugelernt🙂 Dass sogar schon die Kids auf Krabbenfang gehen .. doll! Ich finde es auch gut, dass bei Euch keine Großindustrie die Sache in der Hand hat, sondern dass es wirklich noch über die Fischer läuft ..ganz ursprünglich.

    Liebe Grüße zu Euch, und frohe Ostern wünscht Euch
    Ocean🙂

    Like

    • Liebe Ocean,

      schön, wieder von dir zu lesen. Ich hoffe, dir geht’s gut.

      Es ist ein großer Vorteil dieser Gegend, dass sie völlig industriefrei ist. Deswegen ist sie auch wenig bevölkert, da es in Nord Norfolk keine Arbeitsplätze gibt. Selbst der Tourismus wird hier nur im kleinen Stil betrieben. Das liegt daran, dass dieses Gebiet abseits liegt, man fährt nicht durch, wenn man die größeren Strecken in England reist. Deswegen wurde Nord Norfolk von einigen Autoren “The Edge” genannt, das Ende der Welt. Wir lieben das weltendige Leben, in dem das Meer, der Garten, die Natur die Angelpunkte sind.

      Wir Drei aus Cley wünschen dir frohe, sonnige Ostern🙂
      Dina ist in Bonn und lässt auch lieb grüßen

      Like

  23. What is a Gilly crab? -)
    I once made it to Suffolk, I hope to see Norfolk one day too. Our next trip to England later this year takes us to the north. England is great. Lucky you to live there!🙂

    Like

    • Dear Paul,
      Gilly Crabs are those small crabs the children use to catch. I just learned that they are eatable – but nobody eats them here. They are too small anyway. Gilly crabs belong to the Gilly Invertrebrates like snails and butterflies > https://sites.google.com/site/gillyinvertebrates/
      I appreciate it very much to be able to live at the North Norfolk coast.
      All the best, happy Easter
      Klausbernd and his busy Bookfayries Siri and Selma

      Like

  24. Welch schöner und interessanter Bericht🙂 Ich kann Euch Buchfeen sehr verstehen. Ich wäre wahrscheinlich auch liebend gern mit den Fischern hinausgefahren. Vielleicht solltet Ihr Euch das nächste Mal besser rüsten – mit Friesennerz und Rettungsweste😉
    Liebe Grüße von der Silberdistel, auch an Dich, Klausbernd, und Dina

    Like

    • Guten Tag, liebe Silberdistel,
      ja, wir haben uns nun vorgenommen, dass immer, wenn wir zum Strand gehen, wir unsere Feensäckchen mit Friesennerz und Rettungsweste mitnehmen, so dass Masterchen und Dina uns aufs Boot lassen müssen.
      Ganz, ganz liebe Grüße von uns🙂 und wir wünschen dir eine wunderschöne Woche
      Klausbernd aus Cley🙂 und Dina, Siri und Selma aus Fredrikstad in Norwegen🙂🙂🙂

      Like

    • Guten Abend, lieber Ernst,
      herzlichen Dank für deine lieben Worte, über die wir uns sehr freuten🙂🙂
      Liebe Grüße von
      Klausbernd in Cley next the Sea
      und Dina, Siri und Selma in Norwegen

      Like

  25. I have not picked up my paint brushes in decades but I am tempted to give the scenes with the boats and men and traps a try. Of course I would leave out the vehicles and not have modern clothing on the people.

    Like

    • Dear Carl,
      we would love to see your picture afterwards🙂
      Of course it’s a kind of scene that could have taken places many, many years ago.
      Happy painting
      Klausbernd🙂
      and the other three

      Like

  26. Now that was quite an adventure indeed and the photo’s are stunning as usual Dina and Klaus! I must say, I would just play with the crabs and share with them my smoked backon.😆

    Like

    • Good morning, dear Sonel,
      happy playing! Actually these children catching crabs are kind of playing with them as well, aren’t they?
      Thanks and all the best
      Klausbernd and Dina, Siri and Selma

      Like

  27. Pingback: Reed Harvest in Norfolk | The World according to Dina

  28. This is just a fantastic post…somewhere in my past life I definitely was a fisherman, as seeing anyone working on a boat (crab or fish) I have a great desire to go out and join them so I know just how you must have felt wanting to go out with them. We get Dungeness crab here in Seattle, and it is without a doubt my favorite meal (with salmon than run in the nearby rivers being a close second). If you ever make it this way, I’ll definitely take you crabbing (although it is pretty easy, 30-40 yards off shore in a row boat, but with traps that do look very similar to the ones I see in your photos). 🙂

    Great photos of all this, and I think Norfolk would be my choice to visit and live during the summer as it looks healthy and beautiful (although a lot of hard work as well). Wonderful post…

    Like

    • Dear Dalo,
      you are very welcome visiting us when you come over to Norfolk🙂
      We noticed how well you can tune into a fisherman’s life on your blog. I have a similar feeling, when I see a boat or I am boating myself I see Vikings knowing I wouldn’t have survived their lifes.
      Thanks for taking us out crabbing if we would come to Seattle. We love to.
      Here crabbing is quite a hard work and hardly any fishermen is able to do it after 40. As they are all the time wet and cold they all get haevy rheumatic problems and quite a number still drown. It’s most dangerous when they get their boats in or out from the beach. The boat easily is turned over by the powerful powerful waves locking the fishermen in down under or they get struck by the capsizing boat. Crabbing is GREAT when the weather is sunny and the seas are calm🙂
      Cheers
      Klausbernd and the rest of the gang🙂

      Like

    • Yes indeed, a crabber and fisherman’s life is difficult. There is the Fisherman’s Terminal, a mooring area for local fishing fleets (many from the Deadliest Catch programs). There is nice memorial there for commercial fishermen and women who have been lost at sea. A tough life. Tough but also a bit rewarding being so close to the sea/nature. Take care Fab Four of Cley and have a great week!

      Liked by 1 person

    • P.S.:
      All the fishermen here know about the hard work and the risks but they agree they wont miss fishing, it’s the freedom that makes it so attractive for them. In former times they could even make it to a profitable business by smuggeling, but since dope and booze have more or less the same price in Holland as in England smuggeling doesn’t make sense any longer but there is still the romantic feeling of freedom (although it’s very hierarchical on a boat).

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: