The Lake Poets

The world has to be romanticized to find the natural meaning again
Die Welt muss romantisiert werden, so findet man den ursprünglichen Sinn wieder

Novalis (Friedrich von Hardenberg)

Novalis wrote this in his fragments, one of the literary forms the Romantic poets liked very much, because the essence of the Romantic is uncertainty as Oscar Wilde once said.
Novalis schrieb dies in seinen Fragmenten, eine der Lieblingsformen der deutschen Romantiker, denn “das Wesen der Romantik ist Ungewissheit”, wie Oscar Wilde es treffend ausdrückte.

 

Hanne Siebers_DSC_0171

Today we abduct you into the world of the English romantic poet William Wordsworth (1770-1850), who, by the way, got very old for a Romantic (most of them died before they reached 30). The pictures are all taken from Wordsworth’s Georgian childhood home at Cockermouth/Lake District, which we visited with Dina and our Master last year. With Wordworth’s “Lyrical Ballads”, which he wrote together with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, the Romantic period started in England in 1798.
The Romantic artists, all fascinated by the inner life, have been very much interested by the phenomena of sleep and dreaming like only the Spanish baroque poet Calderon de la Barca (1600-1681) before them, who thought that life is a dream.   

Heute entführen wir euch in die Welt des englischen Romantikers William Wordsworth (1770-1850), der übrigens für einen Romantiker ziemlich alt wurde (die meisten starben vor 30 und wollten das auch). Die Fotos stammen von William Wordsworth’s georgianischem Geburtshaus in Cockermouth im Lake District, das wir mit Dina und Masterchen voriges Jahr besuchten. Wordsworth startete sozusagen die englische Romantik mit seinen “Lyrical Ballads”, die er zusammen mit Samuel Taylor Coleridge 1798 veröffentlichte.
Die Romantiker, vom Seelenleben fasziniert, waren sehr am Schlaf und Traum interessiert, wie zuvor nur der spanische Barockdichter Calderon de la Barca (1600-1681), der das Leben für einen Traum hielt.

 

Hanne Siebers_DSC_0169

William Wordsworth was the second of seven children. On the wall in the children’s bedroom you see the nighties he and his sisters and brothers wore. We very much liked their sleepy heads which would suit us Bookfayries surely as well.

William Wordsworth wurde als zweites von sieben Kindern geboren und hier sehr ihr die Nachhemden von ihm und seinen Geschwistern im Kinderschlafzimmer. Besonders gut gefielen uns die Schlafmützchen, die uns Buchfeen auch sicher gut stehen würden.

Hanne Siebers DSC_0162 2

Children need a lot of sleep, much more than adults do, because they have to work out and learn so much. This probably explains why they are able to sleep almost anywhere like in this washing basked in the picture above. We wondered, if sleeping Moses was submitted in such a basked, made water tight of course. And as we just mentioned the bible, baby Jesus was sleeping in a manger and therefore day care centres for children are called crèches or, in German, Krippen, both meaning manger.

Kinder benötigen viel Schlaf, viel mehr als Erwachsene, da sie so viel zu verarbeiten und somit zu lernen haben. So kommt es, dass sie fast in jeder Situation schlafen können, wie z.B. in diesem Wäschekorb auf dem Bild oben. Ob Moses schlafend in solch einem Korb, abgedichtet natürlich, auf dem Wasser ausgesetzt wurde, fragten wir uns. Und wir schon einmal bei der Bibel sind, das Jesus-Baby soll ja in einer Krippe geschlafen haben, weswegen wir heute noch von “Kinderkrippe” im Sinne von Kindergarten reden.

Hanne Siebers_DSC_0163

 

This is one of the beds where the Wordsworth children snuggled up to each other. Do you see their toys?
William had a lifelong close relationship to his sister Dorothy, who became a poet too, known for her notes, diaries and letters. She started writing when she was 17 living happily at her uncle’s in Norfolk for five years. That was in the rectory at Forncett St. Peter near Long Stratton in South Norfolk, a place we often pass by going for the ferry to visit Dina on the continent. We see Dorothy as an early feministic writer like Virginia Woolf did, who studied her notes and diaries.

Das ist eins der Kuschelbettchen von William Wordsworth und seinen Geschwistern. Seht ihr ihr Spielzeug?
William hatte ein enges Verhältnis besonders zu seiner Schwester Dorothy, die auch Dichterin und besonders Brief- und Tagebuchschreiberin wurde, und der er zeitlebens verbunden blieb. Sie begann zu schreiben, als sie von ihrem 17. bis 22. Lebensjahr bei ihrem Onkel in Norfolk eine glückliche Zeit verdrachte. Dies war in der Rectory in Forncett St. Peter in Süd Norfolk, einem Ort, an dem wir vorbeifahren, wenn wir Dina in Deutschland besuchen. Wir würden Dorothy als eine frühe feministische Dichterin ansehen wie Virginia Woolf, die sich ausgiebig mit Dorothys Tagebüchern beschäftigte.

Hanne Siebers dsc-165-2

 

In the following pictures you see the cozy Wordsworth House. We Bookfayries immediately agreed that we could have lived here happily as well. I, Selma Bookfayrie, was very much impressed by the kitchen garden and this big kitchen with an open fire.

In den unteren Bildern seht ihr das gemütliche Wordsworth House. Wir waren uns sogleich einig, dass auch wir uns hier glücklich gefühlt hätten. Mir, der praktische Selmafee, hat besonders der große Nutzgarten imponiert und die große Küche, in der das Angebaute verarbeitet wurde.

Hanne Siebers_Collage_Wordsworth1

Dorothy and her brother William lived in Dove Cottage/Grasmere (Lake District) between 1799-1808 – “a plain living, but high thinking” how they put it. Not far from them lived Robert Southy, a one of the Lake Poets as well. Dove cottage was later taken by their friend Thomas de Quincey – and now we are at the topic of dreaming again. Quincey became famous for his “Confessions of an English Opium-Eater” (1821). More than hundred years later, in 1931, the cottage was purchased by the famous children’s book author and illustrator Beatrix Potter.
Because of this past Dove Cottage is too much touristy for us. We recommend a visit to the less famous Wordsworth House.

Von 1799-1808 lebten Dorothy und William im Dove Cottage/Grasmere, Lake District, wo sie “plain living, but high thinking” pflegten. Nahebei lebte Robert Southy, ein anderer der Lake Poets. Dove Cottage übernahm später ihr Freund Thomas de Quincey, mit dem wir wieder beim Traum angelangt sind, denn er wurde mit “Confessions of an English Opium-Eater” (1821) äußerst berühmt wie berüchtigt. Das Cottage wurde dann 1931 von der erfolgreichen Illustratorin und Kinderbuchautorin Beatrix Potter gekauft.
Wegen seiner Geschichte ist das kleine Dove Cottage äußerst touristisch, wir fanden das fast unbeachtete Wordsworth House weitaus sehenswerter.

 

Lots of love
Alles Liebe
Siri and Selma, the romantic Bookfayries

🙂🙂

Siris Anmerkung für unsere deutschen Leser:
In Masterchen Literaturgeschichten fand ich den kryptischen Ausdruck “Seepoeten”, mir war nicht klar, dass damit Wordsworth, Coleridge and Southy als Begründer der englischen Romantik gemeint waren. Nun weiß ich es und ihr wisst es auch🙂

 

 

© Text and photos: Hanne Siebers and Klausbernd Vollmar.
All photos are taken at William Wordsworth’s Georgian childhood home and garden in Cockermouth, Cumbria, 2013

144 thoughts

    • Dear MM,

      Dina is the one who likes to plan our holidays. She reads a lot in literary travel guides and so we always visit all these places which have a connection with writers or books. But the Wordsworth House in Cockermouth was not touristy at all. We were most of the time – a whole afternoon – the only visitors there.

      We wish you a happy weekend
      Klausbernd, Dina, Siri and Selma

      Like

  1. Interesting reading and beautiful photos, that comes very handy before my visit to England later this year. The Lake District is on my list .The nighties look quite romantic, the first photo is my favourite.🙂 I never thought of the essence of the Romantic Movement as being uncertainty. But it is, I suppose. What would Jane Austen be without uncertainty….
    Thank you all for a great post!
    Marc

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Marc,

      thank you very much🙂
      The nighties are sweet, aren’t they?
      The Romantics discovered the world of nature and feelings which is a world without certainties. And those uncertainties make their writing interesting, at least we feel like this.

      Greetings, have a great weekend
      the Fab Four of Cley
      Kb🙂
      who wrote his first paper at the university about the fairy tales of the Romantic poets

      Like

  2. Dear Siri and Selma,
    I’m sure those nighties would look very good on you!🙂
    It looks like you were very lucky with your trip to the Lakes and all the places you went to. It gives my a shiver to think about our trip many year sago, it was terribly crowded and the romantic landscape appeared less romantic because of all the tourists, including us, of course…
    Greetings to you all from Tromsø (visiting family)
    Per Magnus
    – it’s very cold up North but the south of Norway is reaching tropical temperatures this weekend.

    Liked by 1 person

    • My dear Per M.,

      well, this is a secret, don’t tell anybody, promise!
      We couldn’t help but trying this nighties🙂 They looked sooo great on us! And now we hope that Dina and our Master will give such nighties soon – we even found out where to get them in Holt, our next market town.
      Dove Cottage as well as Beatrix Potter’s cottage are both very, very touristy. Those two little cottages are crowded with vositors like us all the year round. In Dove cottage we liked the little garden but we have to say that even with all those people there we very much liked Beatrix Potter’s cottage. It is so cosy and we would say: Bookfayrie dimension – small but really nice, not claustophobic at all. We could have immediately moved in there. And, of course, the garden is very fine.

      Greetings and lot of love to Tromsö – have you seen northern lights there? We would love to see them on day. Our Master saw aurora borealis quite oft but we NEVER ever did! A shame …

      With fairy dust from
      Siri and Selma, the busy Bookfayries
      🙂🙂

      Like

    • Thanks, dear Per Magnus,

      oh dear, mentioning Tromsö was a ‘mistake’😉 Siri and Selma ask nearly every day if we could go to Tromsö for seeing aurora borealis. Siri read that the Inuit see in them the souls of died children. She read as well that Tromsö is place to go for seeing northern lights. Both read this children’s book “Northern Lights” by Philip Pullman also and now they want to see them.

      I suppose one has to go to the Lakes in autumn. We have been there in late October, that’s fine. One has to avoid summer.

      Lots of love
      from
      Klausbernd and Dina

      Like

    • Oh, dankeschön, das freut uns sehr🙂
      Liebe Grüße
      von
      Siri und Selma, Klausbernd und Dina
      und habe ein fröhliches Wochenende🙂 und vielen Dank fürs Kommentieren

      Like

    • You are very welcome🙂
      Great that you liked our post.
      Have a happy weekend
      the Fab Four of Cley
      Kb🙂

      Like

  3. Oh, I missed this place when I drove through the Lakes. Looks like a nice place to grow up!
    What’s the most romantic novel you ever read? I know Dina says “Gone with the wind”, but I think “Pride and prejudice” is equally romantic. Unfortunately, I can’t remember if I ever read anything by the lake poets…😉
    Ha en finfin helg!
    KLEM, Tone

    Like

    • Dear Tone,
      the most romantic novel I ever read is Goethe’s “The Sorrows of Young Werther” – actually a horrible book, which even his author Goethe saw as a mistake, but nevertheless this Romantic novel was the first international bestseller. But don’t read it, too much feeling … just over the top.
      Of course Mary Shelly’s “Frankenstein” and Bram Stoker’s “Dracula” are very, very Romantic and all novels by Jane Austen. I like very much the novel “Henry Von Ofterdingen” by Novalis (Friedrich von Hardenberg), it’s a fragment and that was very typical for the Romantics as well writing fragments.
      If you like poems of nature then Wordsworth is the one to read.
      Thank you very much – mange tak
      ha en fin dag
      KLEM
      Klausbernd🙂

      Like

    • Dear GPCox
      you are very, very welcome🙂
      We are happy that you liked our post.
      Have an easy weekend and thanks a lot
      Siri and Selma

      Like

    • Hi, dear Cindi🙂
      you are very welcome and thank you very much for your kind words. Great that you like our post.
      It was great trip we really enjoyed very much.
      Enjoy the weekend
      Dina and Klausbernd, Siri and Selma

      Like

  4. Wieder einen ganz tollen Beitrag vom ganzen Team! Den Exkurs zum Schlafverhalten fand ich interessant: also haben Ältere Personen viel weniger Bedarf an Schlaf – richtig? Mein Vater (81) schläft auffallend viel, finde ich. Er geht zwar spät ins Bett und schläft lange, aber mit einem Nickerchen tagsüber ist es nicht getan; er schläft locker 3-4 Stunden, manchmal länger. Egal wann ich tagsüber anrufe, Ich wecke ihn! Er ist verwitwet und einsam, leidet er vielleicht an einer Depression?
    Liebe Grüße!
    Jürgen

    Like

    • Guten Tag, lieber Jürgen,
      ja, die Schlafforschung geht davon aus, dass ab 60 die notwendige Schlafdauer abnimmt, deswegen spricht man auch von der “senilen Bettflucht”. Typisch ist jedoch bei deinem Vater der sogenannte “zerhackte Schlaf” – wie bei Kleinkindern wird nicht mehr an einem Stück geschlafen. Das ist zwar auch ein Symptom echter Depression, aber in diesem Fall wohl eher altersbedingt.
      Das längere Schlafen tagsüber mag organische Ursachen haben, die eine Schwäche bedingen. Zur echten Depression gehört noch die sogenannten Tagesamplitude, d.h. morgens ist man schlecht drauf, aber abends ohne weiteres aktiv und froh gestimmt.
      Vieles Schlafen ist oft ein Fluchtverhalten, Flucht vor dem Leben, das einem zu mühsam oder nicht mehr sinnvoll erscheint. Es ist eine Sonderform der Verdrängung. Ich vermute, wenn es auch kühn ist, von solch wenigen Infos eine Ansicht zu verkünden, dass es sich bei deinem Vater um Lebensflucht, also eine Verdrängung handelt, die ja auch nachvollziehbar ist.
      Liebe Grüße dir, habe ein frohes Wochenende
      Klausbernd

      Like

    • Guten Morgen, lieber Klausbernd,
      herzlichen Dank für deine klugen Worte! Das ist gar nicht kühn, was du vermutest. Ich werde es mit seinem Hausarzt besprechen- oder wenigstens erwähnen. Es mit meinem Vater direkt zu erörtern finde ich schwer, da fehlen mir die Worte.
      Das Thema Schlaf ist interessant. Ich bin beruflich sehr eingespannt and sehne mich wie viele oft nach mehr Schlaf. Mich verblüfft immer wieder wie viele unter Schlafstörungen leiden. Am Wochenende traf ich alte Schulfreunde in Allgäu und irgendwie kamen wir auf Schlafen zu sprechen. Insbesondere die Frauen schienen leichte bis mittelgroße Probleme mit Ein- und Durchschlafen zu haben. Nochmals ganz lieben Dank für deine ausführliche Antwort!
      Jürgen

      Like

    • Guten Abend, lieber Jürgen,
      der Schlaf reagiert ganz schnell auf Stress und Spannungen. Man nimmt an, dass in Deutschland über 60% der Bevölkerung an Schlafstörungen leiden. Man ist schon gesegnet, wenn man gut schlafen kann.
      Für die Schlafdauer gibt es so eine Faustregel: nie unter 6 Std., dabei können sich die jedoch aus Nacht- und Mittagsschlaf addieren.
      Habe eine feine Woche und ich wünsche dir einen gesegneten Schlaf
      Klausbernd und seine Kleinfeinfeen Siri und Selma

      Like

    • Dear Tish,
      this trip made me like Wordworth’s poetry. Before I had my problems with the Romantic poets, I rather liked the novelists of this age like Jane Austen, Walter Scott, Mary Shelley, Frances Burney, Mary Hays and Thomas Love Peacock. I actually only knew of the Romantic lyrics this of Byron before this trip.
      And these nighties, aren’t they sweet?
      All the best
      Klausbernd
      Greetings from Dina, Siri and Selma as well

      Like

    • Dear M-R
      thank you as well. You seem to be a Wordsworth-fan …
      Enjoy the weekend
      the Fab Four
      🙂🙂🙂🙂

      Like

    • Hi, dear Gallivanta,
      you are very welcome🙂 We are happy that you liked our outing.
      All the best and thanks
      the Fab Four of Cley
      Kb🙂

      Like

  5. Hei!
    …fand ich den kryptischen Ausdruck “Seepoeten”, mir war nicht klar, dass damit Wordsworth, Coleridge and Southy als Begründer der englischen Romantik gemeint waren..
    Oh dear, tried to find the Norwegian equivalent , but zero… Has anyone heard of “Sjøpoetene” eller “Innsjøpoetene”? Google wants to serve me poteter og/eller øl.🙂
    Herlige bilder! I*m sure you Four have a lot of fun traveling together!
    Klem fra
    Hjerter

    Like

    • No, I don’t know,🙂 but Järvikoulu ist the Finnish name for the Lake Poets. I suppose you would say Lake Poets too, as most of the Germans do.
      In a hurry, kram, klem
      Annalena🙂

      Like

    • Hei, liebe Hjerter🙂
      nee, “Seepoeten” hättre ich auch nicht gewusst, wer damit gemeint ist, selbst unsere kluge Siri nicht😉
      We love to travel together and on all our our trips we had lots and lots of fun. Dina and our beloved Bookfayries really like to travel. They always have to persuade me. But the moment we are on the road I like it very much.
      KLEM
      ha en fin dag
      Klausbernd

      Like

    • Dear Annalena,
      you are right, we say “Lake Poets” in German as well.
      Lots of love
      KLEM
      Klausbernd xxx

      Like

    • Dear Sue,
      you are right some places are too touristy, but on the other hand we are tourists as well. We add to the “touristyness”. And, well, some topics – like the English Romantics – are connected with such places.
      But anyway I know exactly what you mean and usually we avoid those touristy places as well.
      Have a happy weekend
      Klausbernd and Dina

      Like

  6. It may be touristy, but I love the historical association of the house over the years. From Wordsworth, to De Quincey, and on to Beatrix Potter. What a place of legend and inspiration it must be.
    The photos are exceptionally sharp, and accompany the story so well, as they always do.
    Love from Pete and Ollie in Beetley. X

    Like

    • Dear Pete and Ollie
      thanks a lot🙂
      It is amazing how much inspiration there was. There seemed to be a Muse living at the Lakes. Maybe she moved on because of all those tourists😉
      Lots of Love
      from
      Dina ans Klausbernd xx
      We have fine weather in Cley and hope you will have a sunny weekend as well

      Like

    • Dear Sue,
      exactly, that was my idea as well.
      Have a sunny weekend
      Klausbernd and Dina, Siri and Selma

      Like

    • Dear Simi🙂
      You are very welcome.
      We are happy that you like our post🙂
      Have a great weekend and thanks
      the Fab Four of Cley
      Kb🙂

      Like

    • Dear Amy,
      THANK YOU🙂
      All the best, enjoy the weekend
      Greetings from the sunny coast of North Norfolk
      Klausbernd and Dina and our beloved Bookfayries Siri and Selma

      Like

  7. I love the story behind “Kubla Khan” (Samuel Taylor Coleridge) as well as its interesting rhyme scheme, variable line lengths, and intense focus on nature. It’s both a good example of Romantic poetry and proof that even your weird dreams can be turned into a masterpiece.🙂 The list of German Romantic poets and artists is one of the finest. I’m not so familiar with the Norwegian ones, I suppose Grieg belongs to the Romantic?
    Thank you for this excellent post!
    Sarah

    Like

    • Yes, dear Sarah, you’re right. Edvard Grieg is a romantic composer. And we love Grieg and his plays and music are are being played and conducted in the nature, the mountains every year. The Norwegian list of Romantic poets is very short compared to the German one!🙂 If you ask a Norwegian about a Romantic artist, I suppose the answer will be Tidemand and Gude. Well, that’s not one, but two: Gude painted the landscape and Tidemand the figures. “Bryllupsferden i Hardanger” is the most famous Romantic piece of art we’ve got:

      Brudeferden

      Thank you so much for your kind comment!
      Dina

      Like

    • Dear Sarah,
      thank you very much🙂
      Indeed, there were many German Romantic writers in every genre from fairy tale to novel, from lyrics to play – and of course other artists as well. The Germans loved and still love their Romantic artist.
      I like the “Kubla Khan” story as well. Well, never disturb someone who is high😉 But on the other hand the fragment was a very much liked form of the artist of that time (in Germany f.e. “Henry Von Ofterdingen” by Novalis – for me THE Romantic German novel).
      All the best
      Klausbernd

      Like

    • Interesting piece of art, Dina! It reminds me of your 17th of May, we saw it on the news recently. How very modern -I have never heard of a combined work like this, one painter does the landscape and the other paint fill in the rest, but that’s how it works today in many fields. You do what you can best.

      Like

    • Ups, my comment went off and I was not quite ready, sorry!
      Ah, Novalis – how wonderful. You bring back many memories, Klausbernd. The blue flower as a key symbol in Romantiscism. As for the German Romantics I remember vividly the collection “Des Knaben Wunderhorn”, our lecturer loved it! An important source of idealized folklore. Many composers, not only Mahler, set music to selected poems from “Des Knaben Wunderhorn”, I greatly enjoy the music and lyrics still today.
      Maybe Norway still seem to live in a semi Romantic period? Romantic nationalism can be seen on a day like the 17th of May. What is more Romantic than bunad?🙂
      Enjoy your weekend.
      Sarah

      Like

    • Well, there’s no doubt about it; on the 17th of May the Norwegians feel the most “Norwegian” and they love to dress up in a bunad. It’s emotional and quite romantic!🙂
      Klausbernd gave me a beautiful edition of “Des Knaben Wunderhorn”, a “must have”, I have it next to me right now.🙂
      Wishing you a lovely Sunday,
      Dina

      Like

    • Dear Sarah,

      as you seem to like the Romantics that much (like me) you would surely like the poetic fairy tales by Ludwig Tieck. He did write two:
      Der Blonde Egbert
      Der Runenberg
      I don’t know, if an English translation exists. Tieck was the other exception besides Wordsworth as he died quite old and therefore was the editor of many of the German Romantic poets.
      The important Norwegian Romantic writers are Henrik Wergeland and Johann Sebastian Welhaven and a lady Melissa Daschler (but I don’t know anything about her).
      Typical for the German Romantics was collecting fairy tales – like the Grimm brothers – and folk songs – like “Des Knaben Wunderhorn”. In the age of the Romantics it started to speak of the “good old times”. The Romantics looked back in history and, by the way, they discovered the middle ages which were nearly forgotten because they were seen as dark and horrible times (especially during the Age of Reason).

      Have a happy holiday
      love from the sunny coast of Norfolk
      Klausbernd🙂
      Greeting from Dina, Siri and Selma as well

      Like

    • I’m faintly familiar with the name Henrik Wergeland, but not so much with his work. I opened a few books that have been collecting too much dust and refreshed my memory, thank you!🙂
      I find your blog very inspiring and educating!
      Sarah

      Like

    • Dear Sarah,
      thank you very much.
      Henrik Wergeland is on one hand this Norwegian Romantic poet but on the other hand in the modern Norwegian literature Jan Kjaerstad wrote a trilogy “The Discoverer”, “The Conquerer” and “The Seducer” which is known as the Wergeland-trilogy because the protagonist in all 3 novels is (Jonas) Wergeland. By the way all three (quite big) novels are fun to read and at the same time you learn a lot about Norwegian history. It’s for me one of the best post-modern cycle of novels I know. And, of course, Kjaerstad plays with this association of Henrik Wergeland the Romantic and Jonas Wergeland the TV presenter.
      All the best
      Klausbernd🙂 from rainy Cley – the perfect day for reading …

      Like

  8. Oh, that first shot is an absolute beauty Dina! Wow! I just love it! What a lovely tour through this beautiful house. I wouldn’t mind living in a house like that as well. That beautiful stove is to die for! Remind me of the coal stove my granny had in her kitchen. I love them and one day when I all grown up and have my own house, I want a stove like that. Stunning shots and beautiful history. Thanks for sharing.😀 ♥ Big Hugs ♥

    Like

    • Dear Sonel,
      you are very welcome🙂 It’s so much fun sharing these impressions.
      X A big HUG as well x
      Klausbernd🙂 and his funny Bookfayries Siri and Selma🙂🙂

      Like

  9. Ah, where would we all be without the Romantics! What a lovely post girls, put beautifully together with the fab photos from Dina of course, and the wisdom of the Master. You must be very BIG fayries to fit into those night-shirts!

    We will be in the Lakes in a week’s time and will try and visit Cockermouth. We are hoping that Grasmere won’t be too busy too, but aim to spend most of our time in the northern lakes away from Windermere and just soak in the atmosphere. Hopefully not get soaked😉
    Jude xx

    Like

    • Dear Jude,
      we wish you a sunny time in the Lake District.
      In Germany as in England the Romantics were very, very influencal up to nowadays. Crime stories f.e. are a kind of invention of this time and horror as well. It was a time of discovering the the psyche and the individual – quite some time before Freud. By the way Freud (as Jung) did read quite a lot of the German and English Romantic writers.
      We keep our fingers and wings crossed that it will be not too crowded at Grasmere.
      Greetings from sunny Norfolk
      the Fab Four of Cley
      Kb🙂

      Like

    • P.S.
      By the way the nighties did fit Siri and Selma, but they could wear them as dresses as well – and looked very sweet wearing them, like little angels🙂

      Like

  10. Great reading as always. I really must get myself (and my partner) to the lake district some time. I hate the term ‘bucket list’ – sounds too much like a list you tick off rather than somewhere you want to go to enjoy and soak up. OK, I do have a list and I’ll add lake district.
    I love the bi-lingual format of your blog; I make it a challenge to read the German part first and then check if I got it right.

    Like

    • Dear Fat Freddy,
      reminds me on the Freak Brothers😉
      And you understand German. You may find that we quite often don’t really translate and sometimes we even write a different text in German and English – but not that often, only if something is specific German or English.
      The Lake District is worth visiting! And not for cultural reasons only but for its nature as well. If you like hiking its a paradise.
      All the best
      Herzliche Grüße
      happy weekend
      Klausbernd and Dina
      Siri and Selma are snoring already😉

      Like

    • Euch auch ganz liebe Grüße vom hochsommerlichen Cley.
      Macht’s gut
      Vielen Dank
      bis dann
      Klausbernd und Dina
      Siri und Selma schlummern schon selig in ihren Kuschelbettchen

      Like

  11. The Lake Poets als Titel trifft es gut. Herzlichen Dank für die informative und unterhaltsame Exkursion in das Leben von William Wordsworth. Und dazu klasse bildhaft dokumentiert. Wie schrieb William Wordsworth: “Weisheit liegt oftmals näher, wenn wir uns zu Etwas herablassen, als wenn wir uns über Etwas erheben.”
    Liebe Grüße an die Fab Four und euch ein schönes und sonniges Wochenende
    Stefan

    Like

    • Oh, lieber Stefan, deine Wünsche haben gewirkt🙂 Wir haben hier in England ein Bank Holiday Weekend, morgen auch noch frei, und die Sonne scheint vom Feinsten, es ist warm und fast windstill. Ich werde jetzt mit meinen lieben Kleinfeinfeen in den Garten verschwinden.
      Tschüss und ganz herzliche Grüße nach Hamburg
      Klausbernd🙂

      Like

  12. Guten Morgen, wir sind wieder sehr sehr beeindruckt, diese Geistermäntelchen, die die Bewohner des Hauses zum Schlafen anzogen, haben mich ja schon einmal sehr beschäftigt. Am Samstag konnte man in Kaiserslautern solche Schlafhauben in Szenen aus dem Ballett “Pagodenprinz” sehen, sah sehr eigenartig aus…..etwas dümmlich, zwischen all den tanzenden Grazien….
    Heute morgen bin ich bei der Googel-Reise durch diesen Bericht über die Schriftsteller des Lakes District auf mir unbekannte Wörter gestoßen:
    Seelenblindheit und Seelentaubheit.
    Hammer!
    Dankeschön und liebe Grüße an Siri und Selma
    ….am Mittwoch kam die kleine Ebru (4 J.) in den Ballettsaal…”Weißt du waahaas, ich habe eine Rose angefasst!” “Echt? Wo denn?”
    Als ich ihr erzählte, dass wir “Dornröschen träumt” tanzen wollen, liefen plötzlich Tränen über ihr Gesicht, sooooooo freute sie sich…..
    Macht doch nix, wenn das Leben ein wenig zauberhaft und märchenhaft ist oder????

    Like

    • Nein, liebe Pia, das macht rein gar nix, wenn das Leben ein wenig märchenhaft ist. Siri und Selma zaubern ganz viel Freude und Leichtigkeit in unserem Leben!🙂
      Viel Spaß mit “Dornröschen träumt”!
      Liebe Grüße aus Bonn, Dina

      Like

  13. Flotte illustrasjonsbilder, Dina. Collagen din er veldig bra!
    Jeg må bare innrømme, jeg kjenner ikke disse forfatterne. Ingen i huset gjør det, dessverre! Men, med et slik navn MÅ en vel bli forfatter? Og, etter å ha googlet navnene burde jeg vel vite. Skjemmes, Dina, – dette er ikke bra! Men, dansken (besøk) i huset (som er besatt av H.C.Andersen) innrømmer at Wordsworth er ukjent. Fruen (G) vet om forfatteren men kan ikke navngi verker! men vi vi elsker The Lake District! Samuel Coleridge er et forfatternavn vi nå diskuterer mens vi venter på “mutton chops” skal bli ferdige i ovnen med alle våre vårlige krydder bakt inn. Nå skulle dere ha vært her, Dina og Klausbernd. da har dere dette til gode en gang…

    Like

    • Ingen grunn til å skjemmes, Hans!🙂 Jeg var heller ikke fortrolig med disse engelske romantikerne før vi begynte å forberede reisen til Lake District. Det var mitt første besøk og det var umulig å lese reisebøker uten at de hadde en innledning med en strofe av Wordsworth dikt eller at de fire husene hans ble fremstilt som store turistiske reisemål. Mutton chops med vårlige krydder høres aldeles forferdelig godt ut da. Håper dere koset dere lenge, vi skulle gjerne ha vært der!🙂
      Ha en fin søndag!

      Like

  14. a beautiful series of photos and excellent read🙂. I do know this place well.. another one you may like to try on your travels north the South is Mr Straw’s house. this is a house that was left as it was since the early to mid 20th century I do know the history but I’m restricted on time today Dana so here is a link for you🙂 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mr_Straw's_House

    Like

    • Thank you so much for introducing Mr. Straw’s House to us, YorkshireRascal! I love to get more acquainted with NT properties, since last year we’re members of National Trust.🙂 What’s your favourite NT property that you have seen so far?
      North Norfolk has got Blickling Estate and Felbrigg Hall, both very beautiful and we have been there on many occasions. My favourite is Sissinghurst Castle. A place to fall in love with a first sight.
      Wishing you and yours a lovely Sunday,
      Dina, Klausbernd, Siri and Selma

      Like

    • Sorry for my delay in answering Dina.. I was a member of the NT but sadly had to abandon them. We had illness over a long period so couldn’t take advantage of moving around the UK to take full advantage of our membership. There are not too many local sights to visit around South Yorkshire but we did go to the ones closest to us like Nostell priory , Clumber Park and Mr Straws, I’m now a member of the English Heritage , this is much better for us to use and this weekend i’ll be Taking my Grandsons to Bolsover Castle near to Chesterfield. Then there’s Conisbrough Castle near my sons home this is always worth a visit, and of course on our own doorstep is Roche Abbey I do spend many hours down there in all weathers.. Both Conisbrough and Roche Abbey are posted on my blog too.

      Like

  15. Super interessant. Und ja, jetzt habe ich wieder etwas gelernt ueber Seepoeten, das Wordsworth House und das Dove Cottage. Ich wusste, dass Beatrix Potter dort lebte. Aber nicht, dass William Wordsworth vorher dort lebte. Danke ihr vier🙂

    Like

    • Gerne!🙂 Heute besitzt National Trust vier Häuser in The Lake District die allesamt von William Wordsworth bewohnt wurden: dieses Haus in Cockermouth, dann Rydal Mount, Dove Cottage und Allan Bank. Die drei anderen Häuser liegen alle in oder in der unmittelbaren Umgebung von Grasmere.
      Kennst du den zauberhaften Film “Miss Potter”? Der lohnt sich!🙂
      Vielen Dank für den lieben Kommentar. Einen schönen Sonntag wünschen dir
      Dina, Klausbernd, Siri und Selma

      Like

    • Thank you, Adrian! Your visit means a lot to us and your comment put a big smile on our faces!🙂
      Wishing you a lovely Sunday,
      Dina, Klausbernd, Siri and Selma

      Like

    • Ganz, ganz herzlichen Dank, liebe Gabryon! Darüber haben wir Vier uns SEHR gefreut!🙂🙂🙂🙂
      Dina, Klausbernd, Siri und Selma

      Like

    • Ja, das ist eine feine Überraschung zum Morgen! Wir freuen uns sehr und fühlen uns geehrt🙂 Herzlichen Dank und liebe Grüße von der sonnigen Küste Nord-Norfolks auch von mir
      Klausbernd🙂
      und die anderen lassen natürlich auch gerne nochmal lieb grüßen🙂🙂🙂

      Like

  16. il romanticismo di un epoca ormai lontana ci fa molto rimpiangere quei giorni trascorsi con gesti lenti e gentili, in cui si apprezzavano molto di più le piccole cose che rendono preziosa la vita! Un post davvero delizioso, molto, molto apprezzato
    Mille grazie
    the romance of an era now away we regret those days spent with slow and gentle gestures, they appreciated a lot more little things which make life valuable! A post really delicious, very much appreciated

    Like

    • We thank you as well – well, the Romantics let us think of “the good old times” …
      Have a happy Sunday
      wishing you
      Klausbernd, Dina, Siri, Selma

      Like

  17. Pingback: Sonntagsleserin KW #21 – 2014 | buchpost

  18. A visit to Cockermouth seems like must when we find ourselves heading oop North
    Lovely post all round with those *gorgeous photos …. I was wondering if there was going to be a mention of Thomas de Quincy and his book … I found it a fascinating read😉

    Like

    • Dear Poppy T.,
      yes, a visit to Cockermouth is a must. You will like it🙂
      Well, Thomas de Quincy was cult in the beginning of the seventies, a must-read at least in the hippie-circles, which were in their way quite romantic too.
      Have a happy May bank holiday
      wishing you
      Klausbernd, Dina and their happy Bookfayries Siri and Selma

      Like

    • Thank you very much🙂
      It was for us a kind of time travel, travelling back more than 200 years in time.
      All the best
      the Fab Four of Cley🙂 Kb

      Like

    • Good morning, dear Madhu,
      you are very welcome.
      We really fell in love with the Wordsworth house. We were very lucky as we have been the only visitors there that afternoon and so Siri and Selma could play living there😉 and being the sisters of William.
      Have a happy week
      the Fab Four of Cley
      Kb🙂

      Like

    • Dear Walter,
      good morning. Good reading from you🙂
      Thank you very much and have an easy week
      the Fab Four of Cley
      Kb🙂

      Like

  19. Guten Morgen, wo immer ihr seid, während ich euren wunderbaren Bericht, Fotos natürlich eingeschlossen, über William Wordsworth und die Romantik las, fühlte ich mich wie in eine andere Zeit zurückvesetzt, in eine Zeit der Gefühle, der Langsamkeit und der Natur; es war eine Wohltat! Nur als ich Klausbernds Erwähnung von “Die Leiden des jungen Werthers” las, kamen mir auch heute beinahe wieder die Tränen.:) Einen ganz lieben Gruss an alle aus dem regnerischen Tessin.

    Like

    • Guten Morgen, liebe Martina,
      zuerst einmal liebe Grüße und vielen Dank von der sonnigen Küste Norfolks, aber für heute Abend ist auch hier Regen angesagt, den wir nötigst gebrauchen.
      Obwohl ich ein Goethe-Fan bin, bin ich kein Freund von “Die Leiden des jungen Werther”, von denen sich selbst Goethe relativ schnell distanzierte. Er tat damals den Ausspruch, dass er kein Romantiker sei. Goethe haderte mit der Romantik.
      Ich liebe die Kunstmärchen der Romantik, speziell Tieck, und natürlich Novalis. Witziger Weise wohnte ich als Student in einem anthroposophischen Studentenheim, das Hardenberg Haus hieß und so Novalis-Hütte genannt wurde. Novalis war zu der Zeit mein absoluter Lieblingsdichter.
      Ja, die gute alte Zeit, die von den Romantikern beschworen wurde, fasziniert uns noch heute. Deswegen lebe ich auf dem Land in Nord Nordfolk “on the edge”. Erstaunlich, wie viel Romantisches ich in mir noch finden konnte …
      Einen ganz lieben Gruß
      von
      Klausbernd, Siri und Selma aus dem sonnig heißen Norfolk
      und Dina aus Bonn

      Like

    • Herzlichen Dank für diese ausführliche Antwort. In Sachen “Werther” habe ich natürlich ein wenig übertrieben! Ich bin leider keine Novalis Spezialistin, aber ich erinnere mich, dass er den Tod seiner Verlobten nicht überwunden hat und darunter sehr stark litt. Von Tiecke kommt mir jetzt kein Kunstmärchen in den Sinn, aber ich denke da an “Der kleine Prinz”, als moralisches Märchen.
      Es ist schön in euch diese romantische Seite zu spüren.:)
      Bis bald und cari saluti

      Like

    • Liebe Martina,

      es gibt zwei wunderschöne romantische Kunstmärchen von Ludwig Tieck
      Der blonde Egbert
      Der Runenberg
      die sind beide in einem dieser kleinen Reclam-Heftchen erschienen.
      Ich liebe auch sehr E.T.A. Hoffmann. Was ich bes. an der deutschen Romantik liebe, ist die Ironie und die Kritik am Spießertum.
      Zur blauen Blume der Romamtik, mit der “Heinrich von Ofterdingen” beginnt, schreibt die Neo-Romantikerin Ricarda Huch : „Die blaue Blume ist aber das, was jeder sucht, ohne es selbst zu wissen, nenne man es nun Gott, Ewigkeit oder Liebe.“
      Und dann nicht zu vergessen Eichendorff, für den Dichtung ein “Zauberwort” sein soll.

      Genieße diese Woche, hab’s schön
      Klausbernd
      Grüße auch von Dina, Siri und die Oberromantikerin Selma

      Like

    • Lieber Klausbernd und natürlich auch an seine Berater,

      nachdem ich solch tolle Tipps bekommen hatte, nahm ich sofort mein Kindel zur Hand und siehe da, der Blonde Eckhart und der Runenberg sind schon in Camorino angekommen! Allen einen guten Tag, vielleicht auch im Garten! :)L.G. Martina

      Like

    • Liebe Martina,
      viel Freude beim Lesen🙂
      wünscht dir
      Klausbernd

      huch, hier regnet es still vor sich hin, richtig gemütliches Lesewetter. Ich lese gerade ein witziges Buch von Arto Paasilinna “Der wunderbare Massenselbstmord” – Siri liest auf meiner linken Schulter sitzend mit und kichert die ganze Zeit. Die Finnen schreiben wirklich sehr selbstironisch.

      Like

    • das ist aber lieb von dir mir diesen Tipp zu schicken. Ich werde mein Möglichstes tun.:) Ich habe soeben die schöne Geschichte “Der blonde Eckert” gelesen und ich kann dir versichern, dass mir dieses Auf und Ab, das wir im Leben immer wieder erfahren und allgemein gültig ist, sehr gut gefallen hat. Hausaufgaben gemacht!
      Nun beschäftige ich mich mit meiner Zusammenfassung zu AMERICANAH von Chimamanda Adichie, deren Schreibweise mich, trotz allem,- es geht um schwarz/weiss (also FARBEN) in den USA aus afrikanischer Sicht- auch oft zum Schmunzeln bringt.
      Grüss mir auch die Siri ganz lieb. Martina

      Like

    • Danke, liebe Martina🙂
      Siri und Selma lassen lieb zurückgrüßen und senden Fairy Dust, hui, da kommt er …
      Liebe Grüße
      Klausbernd
      Ich bin auf deine Zusammenfassung von AMERICANAH gespannt. Wir schreiben auch gerade an einem Artikel über Farben für den nächsten Blogbeitrag am Ende der Woche.

      Like

    • Liebe Martina,
      schnell bevor ich in meine Sauna verschwinde, toll, dass du dich das Lesen des Romans ebenfalls amüsiert. Das habe ich mir gedacht.
      Liebe Grüße aus dem endlich wieder freundlichen Cley nach 36 Std. Dauerregen, so ein ständiges Nieseln, das jedoch den Garten so schön wie nie werden ließ
      Klausbernd und seine munteren Kleinfeinfeen Siri🙂 und Selma🙂

      Like

  20. Schön, dass dieser Ort so erhalten bleibt. Und vielen Dank, dass ich jetzt was über William Wordsworth erfahren habe. (Der Name ist ja ein Zungenbrecher!)😉
    Liebe Grüße.

    Like

    • Ja, William Wordsworth – wirklich ein Zungenbrecher, wenn auch eine fein Alliteration, eine ganz klassische.
      Habe vielen Dank für deine lieben Worte.
      Eine schöne Woche wünschen dir
      die Fab Four von Cley
      Kb🙂

      Like

  21. Your level of knowledge and interest in life never ceases to impress me 🙂 It’s an education reading your posts.
    I’ve always meant to visit Cockermouth but never made it over to that bit of the coast. Hopefully I will someday, if only to see those sweet night caps 🙂 Many thanks for sharing.

    Like

    • Good evening, dear Jo,

      it’s worth going to Cockermouth and you are right those nighties are sooo sweet!🙂 We couldn’t get Siri and Selma away from this room. Dina and me liked the kitchen as well and, of course, the big garden.

      Have a happy week
      the Fab Four of Cley
      Kb🙂

      Like

  22. Many years ago, when I was a scrapbooker. I would use so many of Wordsworth sayings on my pages. There is a company who designed his words into beautiful works and put them onto a huge sticker to use in your scrapbook. This is where my mind went…when I saw this beautiful museum.

    Like

    • That sounds like the kind of work I’d love to do, Laurie. I’ve so many big scrapbooks, oh dear!🙂 I don’t do them any longer, but I used to do for years .. Do you still have yours? Or did they find a new home when you moved house?
      Thanks for finding the time to pay us a visit. It was lovely to have you here!
      Dina xo

      Like

  23. Ihr Lieben, da habt Ihr ja wieder einen inspirierenden Beitrag geschrieben. Ich sehne mich gleich zurück zum Lake District. Nach Cockermouth haben wir es damals leider nicht geschafft. Aber vielleicht gibt es ja ein nächstes Mal. Lieben Gruß aus Greenwich, wo es heute den ganzen Tag Strippen geregnet hat, Peggy

    Like

    • Ich hoffe, es hat jetzt aufgehört zu Regnen, Peggy! In Bonn gleicht der Wald einen Jungle, so herrlich erfrischt nach mehreren Tagen mit Regen. Norwegen hat zurzeit das beste Europawetter, keine Wolke über das Land und Sonne satt bis 28°.
      Ach ja. Das holen wir nach.🙂
      Alles Liebe zu Euch Drei von Vier aus dem Rheinland
      und Cley, natürlich🙂
      Dina

      Like

    • Oh dear, liebe Peggy und liebe Dina xx

      hier hat es endlich zu regnen aufgehört. Es regnete zumindest in Nord Nordfolk an der Küste 36 Std. ohne Unterlass. So etwas habe ich noch nicht erlebt hier. Aber der Garten ist äußerst happy darüber. So grün war mein Rasen noch nie, alles ist aufgeblüht und es sieht wunderschön aus. Es war der ideale Gartenregen, nie Starkregen, sondern eher ständig nieselig. Das lieben unsere Pflanzen.

      Ja, der ganze Norden, Norwegen, Schweden, Finnland und Schottland, hat feinstes Hochsommerwetter. Aber das war ja oft so in den letzten Jahren, dass der Norden das schönste Sommerwetter in Europa hatte. Das hängt wohl mit der Klimaveränderung zusammen. Oh je und da hoffen wir, dass es so bleibt, denn Dina und ich wollen zusammen mit unseren liebmunteren Buchfeen im Herbst durch die schottischen Higlands fahren. Ich weiß, dass ist riskant wegen des Wetters – aber wir hoffen auf einen feinsten Indian Summer.

      Ganz liebe Grüße an euch beiden vom kleinen Dorf am großen Meer nach Bonn und Greenwich (das jetzt sicher bes. green ist😉 )
      Klausbernd🙂 xx und seine beiden Kleinfeinfeen Siri🙂 oo und Selma🙂 oo

      Like

    • Dear Tina,

      wow! We are very, very happy that like our post that much🙂 THANK YOU!

      Best greetings from the sea
      the Fab Four of Cley
      Kb🙂

      Like

  24. Ihr Lieben! Ich danke Euch fuer den interessanten Lebenslauf des Dichters Wiilliam Wordsworth mit den schoenen Aufnahmen,. Haette mich in seinem Haus auch wohl gefuehlt. Sehr gemuetlich.
    Wuensche Euch ein nettes Wochenende. Hugs! Veraiconica

    Like

    • Vielen Dank, liebe Veronica,
      auch dir wünschen wir ein richtig tolles Wochenende. Und jetzt, da der Regen sich verzogen hat und das Barometer feinstes Wetter verspricht, haben wir sicher ein sonniges Wochenende🙂 so richtig zum Genießen. Hab’s fein.
      Liebe Grüße und Hugs xx
      the Fab Four of Cley
      Kb🙂

      Like

    • You lucky one 🍀 😊
      We wish you a happy sunny 🌞 weekend
      The Fab Four of Cley
      Klausbernd 🚶 and his chirpy Bookfayries 👭 Siri and Selma
      And Dina 👸 from the Rhine valley

      Like

  25. Dear Boofayries,
    As always a beautiful, well researched and educational post.
    Dina, your photography is beautiful – I hope you keep enjoying your D800, the results are sure excellent. I particularly liked your image of the night gowns: very ethereal and well composed.
    Lots of love to the four of you!🙂
    Stefano

    Like

    • Good evening, dear Stefano,
      it really was a hot day today and we were sooo busy cutting hedges from morning to evening and now we are dead beat, oh dear.
      Thank you very much for your kind words🙂
      We suppose our dear Dina will answer as well. She is in the Rhine Valley just now and a little bit handicapped because of a back problem. She will come in about a week to relax in the garden and get well again.
      Lots of love to you and your family, have a happy week🙂
      Siri and Selma, the chirpy Bookfayries of Cley

      Like

  26. “Come grow old with me. The best is yet to be.” William Wordsworth

    What a wonderful reflection! The other day someone asked me whether I read poetry. The question gave me pause. How can we live without poetry? And yet, there are so many times that, in the busyness of life, we let go of things that give meaning to our existence. Last year, we nearly crossed paths in the Lake District. While you were at the Wordsworth House, we were visiting Tintern Abbey, on the Banks of the River Wye. In the middle of the Abbey was a young girl reading William Wordsworth’s “Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey, On Revisitng the Banks of the Wye during a Tour, July 13, 1798 “If I should be where I no more can hear they voice….” I stood there, a silent listener.

    Sorry I haven’t dropped in sooner. A few days ago, my computer had a meltdown and I have been “computerless” for about a week. (Up and running two days ago.) It is good to be connected and catch up on your happenings. I missed the Fab Four!!! Hugs and more hugs coming across the ocean.

    Like

    • Good morning, dear Rebecca,
      we hope everything is fine with your new computer, we keep our fingers and wings crossed. It’s for us the biggest stress when something goes wrong with our technology.
      We, the Bookfayries like to read poetry in bed before we fall asleep, but Dina and our Master rather read novels.
      BUT, I, Klausbernd, wrote my thesis about poetry – the latest poetry cycle of Bert Brecht from 1956. But my beloved Bookfayries are right, nowadays I hardly read poetry any more but I like a poetical language in prose. And if I read poetry then it is from the Romantics.
      It’s a pitty that we didn’t meet up in Northern England but maybe another time, we hope.
      We missed you too but now we are happy to “talk” together again🙂
      With big HUGs, fairy dust and lots of love
      the Fab Four of Cley
      Klausbernd🙂

      Like

    • Thank you very much for your lovely comment, Jacqui! You made my day now.🙂
      Have a lovely weekend. Greetings from all Four of us,
      Dina

      Like

  27. In Brit Lit class in college I had to do an essay on the Lake Poets. So I wrote about 3 of them: Percy , Bysshe and Shelley. Naturally I got an F on the paper. Changed my major to history.

    Like

  28. Dear Carl
    Well, that’s life …😉
    I find Mary Shelley an interesting writer, but her husband quite boring
    Enjoy the weekend
    Klausbernd
    Greetings from Dina, Siri and Selma too

    Like

  29. Pingback: No Time | The World according to Dina

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: