Samphire – A Mermaid’s Kiss

Do you know samphire?
We bet you don’t.
Samphire (Salicornis europaea) – yummy yummy – is also known as sea asparagus or poor man’s asparagus. It’s a wild plant growing in abundance in the saltmarshes where it drowns twice a day. It’s a vegetable of ten to 15 centimeters hight and it’s gathered at our coast since the beginning of times.  

Kennt ihr Samphire? Wir wetten, ihr habt keine Ahnung.
Samphire (Salicornis europaea) – lecker, lecker🙂 – wird auch Seespargel oder Spargel der Armen genannt. Er ist eine Wildpflanze, die in den Salzmarschen wächst und zweimal täglich unter Wasser steht und zweimal täglich über Wasser. Die zehn bis 15 cm hohe Pflanze wird an unserer Küste seit Menschengedenken gepflückt.

Samphire3_kl

Shakespeare knew samphire. So he writes in “King Lear”: “Half-way down/Hangs one that gatheres samphire” – and he adds “a dreadful trade!” Well, you will get very, very muddy picking samphire – that’s part of the fun! We pick our samphire by going to our most secret places by boat. 

Shakespeare erwähnt ihn in “King Lear”: “Half-way down/Hangs one that gatheres samphire” und dann setzt er hinzu “a dreadful trade!” Also, wenn ihr euch mal richtig mit Schlick besauen wollt, dann geht ihr Samphire pflücken. Wir sammeln ihn im Juli und August vom Boot aus an unseren hochgeheimen Stellen.

In the olden days samphire was eaten by sailors for preventing scurvy. Therefore its name: it goes back to Saint Pierre the patron saint of the fishermen and sailors. By the way I, Siri Bookfayrie, read that it relieves flatulence …
Since the middle ages it was burned to use it for producing glass. Therefore it is known as glasswort as well. You will find old glass houses at our coast everywhere where samphire was easy to gather. Its high content of sodium made it ideal for glass making and for producing soap.  

Früher wurde Samphire von den Seeleuten gegessen, da er Skorbut verhindert. So ist auch sein Namen zu verstehen, der von Saint Pierre, dem Schutzpatron der Fischer und Seefahrer, abgeleitet wurde. Ich, Siri Buchfee, las, dass er auch das Pfurzen erleichtert – iiiiiieh😉
Seit dem Mittelalter wurde er verbrannt, um ihn zur Glasherstellung zu benutzen. So kommt es, dass er auch als Glasswort bezeichnet wird. Ihr findet alte Glashütten an unserer Küste stets dort, wo es leicht war, Samphire zu sammeln, der viel Natrium aufweist, weswegen er bisweilen auch zur Seifensiederei benutzt wurde.

Samphire_Fish

Today samphire is seen as a delicacy. And you wouldn’t believe it, on its journey from our coast to London its price is rising by five and sometimes even up to even ten times. It’s in having samphire with fish. But you enjoy it as main dish too or in a salat. But ATTENTION before cooking it has to be thoroughly washed and watered. All the sand has to go and shouldn’t be too salty. Well, if you would be washed constantly by the tide you would be salty too.  The rest is dead easy, just cook for two to three minutes and that’s it! You grab it on its root, pull it across a piece of butter and suck the green off the stalks. 

Heute jedoch gilt er als Delikatesse. Und stellt euch vor, auf seiner Reise von unserer Küste nach London verfünft- bis verzehntfacht sich sein Preis. Mit Fisch genossen, gilt er als Delikatesse. Man kann ihn auch als Hauptgericht und in einem Salat essen. Aber ACHTUNG! bevor ihr ihn kurz aufkocht, müsst ihr ihn bestens waschen und wässern. Der ganz Sand muss herausgewaschen werden und er sollte dazu nicht zu salzig sein. Ist er sauber und gewässert, ist die Zubereitung kinderleicht: zwei bis drei Minuten kochen und fertig ist er. Klassisch nehmt ihr ihn an seiner Wurzel, zieht ihn durch Butter und saugt das  Grüne ab.

The old boys and girls don’t bother with cooking it in our area. They clean and water the samphire, pickle it with vinegar and black pepper and eat it after a couple of days.

Bei uns in Nord Norfolk sparen sich die Old Boys and Girls das Kochen. Sie säubern und wässern den Samphire, legen ihn in Essig und Pfeffer ein, um ihn dann nach ein paar Tagen eingelegt zu genießen.

Never mind how you will eat it, samphire is very healthy because all its minerals – it’s tasty but it doesn’t make you fat😉

Egal, wie ihr ihn genießt, er ist super gesund wegen seiner vielen Mineralien – und dick macht er auch nicht🙂

Samphire_Garden

The celebrated chefs of Norfolk recommend samphire with meat as well. We never had it with meat but we will try it with Dina and our beloved Master.

Die Starköche an unserer Küste hier empfehlen, ihn auch zum Fleisch zu reichen. Wir haben ihn so noch nie gegessen. Werden wir aber mit Dina und Masterchen ausprobieren.

We Bookfayries especially like the yearly competition who finds the longest samphire. I, Selma Bookfayrie, am the proud champion who won twice, well, I am the Samphire-Fayrie-Queen. 

Wir Buchfeen lieben besonders den alljährlichen Wettbewerb, wer den längsten Samphire findet. Ich, Selma Buchfee, bin stolze zweimalige Siegerin dieses Wettbewerbs, sozusagen die Samphire-Fairy-Queen.

With lots of love from the sunny samphire coast
Liebe Grüße von der sonnigen Samphire-Küste

Siri and Selma

© text and illustrations Klausbernd Vollmar and Hanne Siebers

 

207 thoughts

  1. Thank you, Bookfayries! We learned something today. And got to enjoy Dina’s delicious photographs. Enjoy your summer🙂

    Like

    • Thanks for your kind commentary🙂
      What a great summer, isn’t it?!
      Love from the samphire coast
      Siri and Selma, Dina and Klausbernd
      no joke, we just ate lots of samphire we picked today

      Like

  2. Sorry, but you lost your bet. The first time I stumbled over it, cycling in East Anglia, I didn’t know what to make of a sign reading “samp hire”. Could it be a kind of boat for hire? But then I found signs with “samphire” all over the place.🙂

    Like

    • We like “samp hire” – it’s great!
      East Anglia and especially North Norfolk is said to have the best samphire there is. That’s marsh samphire, the yummy one. At rocky coasts you may find rock samphire but that’s not really tasty, too hard.
      All the best from the samp-hire-coast
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • Dear Jude
      thank you very, very much🙂
      Oh dear, we haven’t been at the storyteller’s garden yet, but we will surely go. Thanks for telling us🙂
      Sorry, we haven’t had time for blogging because we had to help Dina and our beloved Master building a fine garden shed. It turned out to be such a sweet shed and we are thinking of moving in there.
      By the way that’s me, Selma Bookfayrie, in your picture. I was looking for my friend Robbin.
      We picked samphire today. And guess where? In Stiffkey! We went there because our dear Master and Dina like the Red Lion and this story of the Vicar of Stiffkey http://kbvollmarblog.wordpress.com/2011/07/18/der-pfarrer-von-stiffkey/. Unfortunately this blog is in German only, but if you see the pictures you will know😉
      Lots of golden fayrie dust from
      Siri and Selma

      Like

    • I have another photo for you from Grasmere – I will post it soon, but off to Canterbury tomorrow. Glad you have got the shed built – I bet it is lovely🙂

      Like

    • Hi Jude,
      we’ve just arrived in Norway, please excuse our absence from blogging the past two weeks, I’ll get back to you as soon as I can; I just wanted to ask if you know The Goods Shed in Canterbury? Kb , Siri, Selma and I dined there every night during our stay in Canterbury. Our Landlady recommended it as her favourite place in town and it is really worth a visit. Very good value for money and excellent food in a very nice market hall just behind the old train station.
      http://thegoodsshed.co.uk/restaurant/
      Have a lovely time in Canterbury! Now I’ll pop over and have a look at your photos for the girls before I grab some sleep. Thank you, Jude, that’s very kind – I know I’ll like it!🙂
      God natt og good night from Fredrikstad
      Dina and the girls ❤

      Like

  3. I, too know about samphire! Came across it in our local fishmongers quite a few years ago (when it wasn’t as stupidly expensive). I used to love it with sea bass. I ought to buy it again because it would be a source of iodine…. I’m giving up gluten containing foods, and our main source of dietary iodine is bread or cereal in this country…. I’m probably going to have to find some dried kelp!

    Like

    • Dear Sue,
      come around! You can pick it here for free🙂 or buy it for little money at stalls at the country roads. It’s quite often the kids who are picking and selling it to get some pocket money. We do it too, specially picked Bookfayrie samphire.
      Have a happy week
      Kindest fairy greetings from
      Siri and Selma

      Like

    • Ah, you lovely Bookfayries! I would love to revisit North Norfolk… One day I shall. Alas it is not on my doorstep! About 180 miles😦

      Like

    • Dear Mary,
      we wish you good luck.
      The East Anglian coast is the best spot for finding it. It’s big enough from now on and you can pick it until the end of August.
      Thanks and all the best
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  4. Yummy, yummy – you are so right. My daughter and I love it, but we are obviously somewhat biased living just down the road in Norwich!! We normally only have it with fish, too. Will try it ‘the new way’ with meat sometime as suggested. Very interesting post, thank you. Agnes

    Like

    • Dear Agnes,
      we suppose most of the people living in Norfolk know it. Have you ever picked it yourself? A muddy busyness but great fun🙂
      Thank you for commenting and have a happy week
      the Fab Four of Cley
      And tell us, please, how you like it with meat

      Like

    • You would think that living in Norfolk would mean knowing about your local delicacies, but I sadly have to report that in some quarters if it isn’t ‘canary’ yellow it isn’t of interest. Did you hear about the Norwich City fan who wondered why so many people in Brazil were supporting City??

      No, we haven’t been out on the marshes collecting – thought perhaps it was restricted these days – you know – like the notices at Sheringham telling you not to remove the pebbles.

      Enjoy reading your blog and appreciate the fine photography. Agnes

      Like

    • Dear Agnes,
      Thank you very much for your answer we really like 😄
      Here at Cley, Salthouse, and Stiffkey everybody picks samphire.
      I have to look out for this sign at Sheringham – funny. Do you know that you could have been deported to Australia if you were caught taking the big flints home? A friend of mine was running around in Blakeney with an impressive flint because he wanted a free passage to Australia 🌊
      All the best
      Klausbernd from the samphire coast
      Dina, Siri and Selma from Norway right now

      Like

  5. This is a lovely post. I have never tried samphire, despite being in Norfolk so many times. Next time I visit… one day… I will be sure to give it a taste! The photos are, as always, simply wonderful. Thank you for sharing! xx

    Like

    • Dear Cathy,
      to try samphire being in Norfolk during July and August is a MUST DO
      You will like it and you may even like it to pick it yourself
      Love from the samphire coast
      the Fab Four of Cley xx

      Like

  6. What a delicate and interesting article. I did not know Samphire but your article makes me really curious. “A mermaid kiss” is perfect for the article as well for the delicious and beautiful photo set. Thank you Siri and Selma for sharing. Enjoy your special summer.
    Stefan

    Like

    • Hi, dear Stefan xx
      great that you liked our article about this funny and tasty plant.
      Outside East Anglia hardly anybody knows it. Our dear Master saw it once on the the menue in a posh restaurant in Germany (Hamburg) – but unbelievable expensive. He was shocked.
      We wish you a happy summer too and send you lots of fairy dust
      Siri and Selma
      🙂🙂

      Like

    • Dear Leslie,
      thanks for commenting.
      We didn’t know about samphire before we came here. Well, don’t exspect an asparagus taste. It tasts quite different.
      All the best
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • Liebe Sabrina,
      habe herzlichen Dank. Jetzt wissen wir endlich, wie man auf Deutsch sagt, eben Salicornes. Wir hatten keine Ahnung …
      Übrigens unser Masterchen hat ja einige Zeit in NRW gelebt, er ist dort geboren und studierte teilweise dort. Da hat er auch nie von Salicornes gehört. Er wusste gar nicht, dass es den gibt, völlig ignorant …
      Ganz liebe Grüße von der Salicornesküste (wir lieben das Wort :-))
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  7. A nice idea to write an article on samphire – in France is also the harvest, we made ​​sweet pickle vinegar – it is also eaten in salads or as a condiment with fish dishes! beautiful macro you realized in nature! thank you

    Like

    • Dear Pat,
      we didn’t know that you eat samphire in France as well. Pickled with vinegar is the traditional way here too. As I wrote above, we had cooked samphire with pepper and lemon this evening – yummy yummy🙂
      Thank for commenting and all the best
      the Fab Four of Cley
      🙂🙂🙂🙂

      Like

    • Good morning, dear Cathy,
      thank you very, very much for your kind words🙂
      We wish you a fabulous day
      the Fab Four of Cley
      🙂🙂🙂🙂

      Like

  8. Very interesting! I have never heard about this plant before!
    Men, har lest meg opp å skjønner at dette må være en sukkulent som inneholder NaCl i tillegg til soda! Spennende!
    Siden den også er god medisin mot skjørbuk må den jo inneholde mye vitamin C?
    Leser også at denne planten binder jordsmonnet ved kysten slik at en unngår “flyvesand”! Det er jo flott!
    Når jeg studerer de flotte bildene dine får jeg en følelse av grønne “åmer”…

    Like

    • Good morning, dear Hans,
      mange tak for your reply🙂
      I am not quite sure but I suppose you have samphire at Norwegian coast as well.
      Ha en fin dag
      Klausbernd
      Dina, Siri and Selma are in Fredrikstad since yesterday

      Like

    • Hei Hans,
      takk for den fine kommentaren din. Ja, denn grønne saken er full av mineraler og når der godt vannet ut er den virkelig lekker. Man kan også spise den som en hovedrett med nypoteter, smør og citron. Den er helt perfekt til fisk. Skulle du og fruen dukke opp her i Norfolk mens det er sommer og sesong for samphire lover vi å by på det, med deilig, kjølig hvitvin.
      En god helg til dere fra Frdrikstad hvor flere av de store skutene ligger på anker i skjærgården. I morgen seiler de stolt inn. Bokfeene og jeg har fått pressekort og blir med på sail parade ved avslutningen p tirsdag; det er en av fordelene ved å være blogger!🙂
      Dina og jentene

      Like

  9. Toller Artikel. Ich liebe Queller, er kommt auf den Salzwiesen der Halligen reichlich vor. Wir verwenden ihn einfach als Salzersatz, auf Ei, zu Salat usw., saftig, knackig, sehr lecker!
    Schönen Gruß

    Like

    • Guten Morgen, lieber Helmut,
      jetzt weiß ich endlich das umgangssprachliche Wort für Samphire im Deutschen. Ich muss zugeben, ich habe das Wort ‘Queller’ noch nie zuvor gehört. Danke für die Info🙂
      Du scheinst dich da ja etwas auszukennen. Wir haben eine Frage: Wie kommt das, dass man den Queller mit seinen Wurzeln aus dem Schlick zieht und dass er dennoch alljährlich in Mengen wieder erscheint?
      Liebe Grüße von der Queller-Küste😉
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  10. Dearest Fab Four xx
    you won your bet. I never heard of samphire before. Now I know and I will watch out for the mermaid’s kiss – great headline🙂
    Lots of Love from Stockholm
    Annalena xx oo

    Like

    • Good morning, dear Annalena,
      we are sure that you have samphire in Sweden as well. Probably in southern Sweden. Watch out! It’s sooo tasty🙂
      Lots of love from all of us xx
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • Hei Annalena,
      you’ll find Salturt (or Glasört) around Östersjöen;

      “Därute på gyttjebädden står i gles ordning, men i hundraden och tusenden en underlig liten planta. Den saknar blad, har en grönaktig, rodnande, liksom ledad kropp – ser ut som en skapelse i venezianskt glas. Glasört heter den också.”

      Ur Den svenska södern av Carl Fries (1963)

      Is Stockholm boiling hot as well? Fredrikstad is almost melting, 32° today, phew and we’re now packing for the island and the summerhouse by the sea. The Tall Ships are on their way, we follow them on a special map.🙂
      Ha det bra!
      Kram, Dina, Siri & Selma❤

      Like

  11. I love north Norfolk samphire – a real summer treat. To me it’s like asparagus that tastes of the sea – all salty and minerally. Good with fish but fine just on its own with butter. I think the Shakespeare quote refers to rock samphire, a different species, which as its name suggests, grows on cliffs hence ‘a dreadful trade’ becuase of the danger collecting it.

    Like

    • In the literature about Shakespeare all the authors agree with you that Shakespeare thought of rock samphire and the dangers of picking it. I have never had rock samphire but read that it is not as tasty as marsh samphire. It’s said to be harder.
      Thanks for your reply. We hope you are well and enjoy this great summer. Friends of mine are arriving on Friday and they already asked me if we could go samphire picking. It’s easy next week as the tides are perfect to go out by boat🙂
      All the best from
      Klausbernd
      and rest of us being in Norway right now

      Like

    • Dear Pete and Ollie,
      for me samphire and asparagus are quite different. In Germany people eat the white asparagus that’s not like samphire at all, but the green asparagus one eats in England is more like samphire although there is a difference as well.
      Thanks for commenting. We wish you and Ollie a happy day🙂
      Lots of love
      the Fab Four of Cley xxxx

      Like

    • Dear Sophie,
      great to read from you again🙂
      Samphire was a poor man’s meal but now it’s getting really fashionable here in England as well and no poor man can afford it. We pick it by ourselves. Especially Siri and Selma love samphire picking. Well, they have there secret spot where the longest samphire grows – so they say.
      We wish you a happy day
      the Fab Four of Cley
      🙂🙂🙂🙂

      Like

    • Dear Amy,
      we hadn’t heard about samphire before we came to Norfolk. At least for us it’s typical for the East Anglian coast. But Helmut commented (above) that you find it in the Northern German saltmarshes around the holms as well and they eat it there too.
      Thanks for replying🙂
      All the best
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • We wish you good luck finding samphire. Actually you should find it at every tidal coast with saltmarshes, but we suppose in Europe only. It’s name Salicornis europaea let us assume this. We tried to find out but in vain. We only know that there are places in North Africa where you find it too.
      All the best and thanks for commenting
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • Hi dear,
      Siri and Selma just found out that you find samphire in the tidal saltmarshes of every continent.
      Love
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • Dear Jo,
      it is local and widely spread in the saltmarshes of the East Anglian coast and the Northern German coast. We have no idea if you find it in the marshes of the Algarve as well. Well, you have got the salt marshes and a tidal flow … just look out for it and good luck!
      Greetings from the samphire coast
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  12. Since I am a vegetarian, would like to try it, especially pickled. Thanks for the introduction to a plant that I’ve not heard about its existence. I wander if it’s found here in the USA among our salt marshes. Will investigate.

    Like

    • Dear Sally,
      as we wrote above it could be that it is a European plant as it biological name Salicornis EUROPAEA says. But we are not quite sure. Actually it needs saltmarshes and a tidal flow and you have this at your coast too. If you find out could you, please, be so kind to let us know.
      Siri just found out: You find it in the North American saltmarshes as well, at least at the Atlantic.
      Love from
      Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  13. Great and delightful photos, Dina! And lovely, interesting and highly apetizing words from Siri and Selma and their Master. I had the pleasure of enjoying Samphire together with fish in Salthouse last year. And now you inspire me to take a closer look at my diary, I’d like to visit the coast again.🙂

    Like

    • Dear John,
      well, Salthouse is the next village to Cley and this strip of coast is famous for its samphire. You find it offered everywhere on stalls here – and quite reasonable. If you want to eat fresh samphire you have to visit our coast in July or August when the samphire is at its best.
      Thanks for your comment
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  14. Absolutely made in heaven! My only problem with this delicacy is nibbling it away so much in the course of throwing it in the pan. Poor man’s asparagus? A rich man should be so lucky!

    Like

    • Dear Patti,
      you are absolutely right, today it’s rich man’s asparagus😉 Especially if you buy it away from our East Anglian coast.
      With poor and rich man’s food it’s quite unusual here: In the 19th c many servants complaint that they got mostly lobsters and crab to eat – and samphire.
      All the best and thanks for your comment
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • No, I don’t think so😦 It’s a pity, isn’t it?!
      But we have one local beer you would like, it’s called ‘Vicar’s Ruin”🙂
      All the best
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • Dear Madeline,
      thank you so much for reblogging🙂 We feel honoured!
      It’s really delicious. You have to try it one day.
      All the best
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  15. You are right, I was not aware about samphire. When I saw your post in feed, I thought it is chili. And wondered , why bunch of chili’s on rocks? And then read your informative post. Hope I will get a chance to taste it someday!

    Like

    • Dear Manisha,
      thanks a lot for your commentary.
      All the best
      the Fab Four of Cley who wish you’ll find samphire one day in the near future

      Like

  16. Hallo ihr lieben vier,
    ich habe Samphire noch nie probiert, wenn ich sie sehe, dann habe ich keinen großen Appetit auf sie. Ich verbinde sie tatsächlich allzu sehr mit dem Meer und was dort so angespült wird. Aber ich denke, ich würde probieren, wenn ich sie irgendwo bekäme.
    Ich esse gerade ganz traditionell ein Toast mit super dick Leberwurst darauf! Guten Appetit, Susanne

    Like

    • Liebe Susanne,
      unser Masterchen liebt Leberwurst wie du, besonders zum Frühstück.
      Naja, mit dem Samphire bzw. Queller ist es so, er schmeckt besonders denjenigen, die Austern, Hummer, Krebs und Fisch lieben. Schon das Essen von Queller ist besonders, da wir kein anderes Gericht kennen, das so gegessen wird. Es ist im Grunde Fingerfood.
      Die Küste gehört hier zu den saubersten in Europa, wofür sie alljährlich eine EU-Auszeichnung bekommt (blaue Flagge). Es wird wenig angeschwemmt.
      Ganz liebe Grüße aus Norfolk und Norwegen nach Berlin
      the Fab Four of Cley
      🙂🙂🙂🙂

      Like

  17. Hallo Ihr Lieben, ich hatte noch nie von Samphire gehoert. Kann mir vorstellen, dass er gut mit Fisch schmecken wuerde. Eure tollen Aufnahmen bereiteten viel Freude. Vielen herzlichen Dank! Hugs! Veronika

    Like

    • Guten Morgen, liebe Veronica,
      Samphire war bis vor paar Jahren außer an unserer Küste völlig unbekannt. Nun wurde er von Starköchen in Frankreich, Belgien, England und Deutschland entdeckt, wobei sein Preis in die Höhe schnellte. Naja, wir sammeln ihn selber.
      Danke für deine freundlichen Worte🙂
      Hugs oo and Kisses xx
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  18. Liebe Hane, lieber Klausbernd, super, dass ich kurz vor meinem Aufenthalt bei dir lieber Klausbernd, wieder den Geschmack des Seespargels im Mund habe, so verführerisch und toll fotografiert von dir liebe Hanne. Ich freu mich bald das Meer im wunderschöneen Norfolk wiedersehen zu können und auf die Bootsfahrten zu den Seespargel-“feldern”.
    Liebe Grüße Konrad

    Like

    • Hi, lieber Konrad,
      was für eine tolle Überraschung hier von dir zu lesen. Wir sehen uns ja am Freitag. Ich freue mich🙂
      Die kommende Woche ist die Tide ideal, um Samphire zu sammeln. Wir hatten die letzten Tage, bevor Hanne mit Siri und Selma nach Norwegen flog, jeden Tag Samphire, den wir allerdings teilweise von Kindern kauften, da wir unser neues Gartenhäuschen bauten und keine Zeit zum Rausfahren hatten.
      Bis übermorgen🙂
      Liebe Grüße an dich und deine Meschpoke
      Klausbernd
      Hier ist es gerade sonnig, relativ warm (22 Grad C), aber es weht eine steife Brise aus Nord. Von Regen keine Spur …

      Like

    • Hallo, lieber Konrad,
      nur kurz als Info: gerade brachte der Postbote das tolle Buch über die Teorie der Fotografie. Ich muss sofort da reinblättern, deswegen mache ich jetzt Schluss. Tschüss
      Klausbernd
      VIELEN DANK!

      Like

  19. Das ist ja eine tolle Allroundpflanze. Die würde ich auch nur zu gerne mal probieren. Eure Fotos sind auch regelrecht zum Anbeißen.
    Liebe Grüße von der sommerlichen Ostsee!🙂

    Like

    • Ja, der Samphire ist wirklich eine Allroundpflanze. Weißt du, dass du ihn auch in Deutschland findest? Zumindest in den Marschen um die Halligen der Nordsee. Wir haben keine Ahnung, ob es ihn auch an der Ostsee gibt, wo die Gezeiten weitaus geringer ausgeprägt sind und der Salzgehalt geringer ist.
      Doch, ihn gibt es auch an der Ostsee! Unsere liebkluge Selma Buchfee hat gerade nachgeguckt.
      Auch dir ganz liebe Grüße von der sommerlichen Nordsee zur sommerlichen Ostsee
      the Fab Four of Cley
      Habt ihr auch solch einen Bilderbuchsommer dieses Jahr?

      Like

    • Oh vielen Dank für den Hinweis. Vielleicht finde ich hier ja mal die Samphire. Der Sommer entwickelt sich gerade prächtig. Hier im Nordosten zumindest. Sonne pur. Mir ist’s schon zu warm.🙂 Im Süden Deutschlands ist’s regnerisch und mindestens 15°C kühler.
      Liebe Grüße an die Nordsee.

      Like

    • Ja, wir haben auch einen wunderschönen Sommer mit Temperaturen um 23 Grad C bei leichter Seebrise, was ich höchst angenehm finde. Unser größtes Problem ist die alljährliche Trockenheit. Obwohl Nord Norfolk an das skandinavische Wettersystem angeschlossen ist, haben wir es nicht so heiß wie die letzten Jahre in Norwegen und Schweden. Ich telefonierte gerade mit Dina in Norwegen. Dort sinkt selbst nachts die Temperatur nicht unter 30 Grad C. Jeder stöhnt. Solche Temperaturen sind an unserer Küste unbekannt – zum Glück!
      Wir beide wohnen vermutlich eh auf dem gleichen Breitenkreis.
      Mit ganz lieben Grüßen von der Samphire-Küste an die Ostsee von
      Klausbernd🙂

      Like

  20. Da Spargel sowieso mein Lieblingsgemüse ist, habe ich euren tollen Bericht zu Samphire mit den schönen Bildern sehr gerne gelesen. In Mallorca haben wir übrigens auch wilden Spargel gesehen, der jedoch eher an trockenen Orten wuchs. Es freut mich, dass eure Gartenhütte, dank der fleissigen Helfern/Helferinnen nun fertig zu sein scheint. Meine besten Grüsse auch nach Norwegen.

    Like

    • Guten Tag, liebe Martina,
      unser Gartenhäuschen steht und ist bereits mit Bootssachen gefüllt und Siri und Selma quengelten die ganze Zeit, ob da nicht einziehen könnten. Jetzt ist erst einmal Ruhe, denn sie flogen gestern mit Dina nach Norwegen.
      Der Samphire ist eigentlich kein wilder Spargel, er gehört zu einer anderen Pflanzenfamilie und ähnelt eher einer Alge. Der Marschqueller braucht völlig durchfeuteten Boden, ja er steht bei den Fluten regelmäßig unter Wasser. Er schmeckt ein wenig wie grüner Spargel. Es gibt ihn an der Küste Mallorcas, wo man ihn in feineren Restaurants mit Lammfleisch serviert – das las uns gestern die liebkluge Selma vor.
      Mit ganz lieben Grüßen von den hochsommerlichen Küsten Norwegens und Norfolks
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • Lieber Klausbernd,
      Ganz lieben Dank für deine Zusatzerklärungen, wobei ich gleich einen riesen Hunger bekomme! Also, dann gibt es auf Malorca anscheinend Samphire und wilder Spargel.
      Geniesse die ruhigen Tage und cari saluti aus dem bewölkten Tessin. Martina

      Like

    • Liebe Martina,
      hier hat es sich jetzt auch bewölkt, und wir hoffen stark auf Regen.
      Genieße auch du den Sommer. Dina und unsere geliebten Buchfeen stöhnen unter der Hitze in Norwegen. Wie letztes Jahr haben sie zur Zeit keine Nacht unter 30 Grad C, ganz fürchterlich.
      Cari saluti, take care and all the best
      Klausbernd

      Like

    • Thanks a lot for commenting🙂
      Will you come soon? Now it’s the best time for samphire picking.
      Love
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • Sometime in the next few weeks, for sure. I’m already salivating at the thought of dressed crab and other local delicacies. Not to mention fish & chips eaten on the beach, looking out over the North Sea, and all the while fending off the greedy seagulls!

      Like

    • Dear Michelle,
      oh dear, food for machines – we don’t like this idea. Thanks for the link!
      We prefer eating it ourselves🙂
      Lots of love
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  21. I love samphire but I don’t buy it very often because it’s not sold in many places here and because it is so expensive. I had no idea of its history so I enjoyed reading this post. 😉

    Like

    • Thank you very much🙂
      Yes, outside East Anglia samphire is quite expensive, actually too expensive to enjoy it.
      Have a happy day
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  22. I’ve never had samphire, but your words alone make me want to try it … and add those amazing photos, and I feel as if I can almost taste it through my computer monitor!

    Like

    • Hi, dear Cindi,
      yes, you should try it one day – it’s great🙂
      With lots of love from the samphire coast
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • Hi, dear Kerry,
      Siri and Selma did a big research about samphire. You find it in the US at coasts with saltmarshes.
      Good luck for finding some samphire🙂
      All the best
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  23. Gottogott wie herrlich die Speise aussieht! Zum anknabbern schöne Bilder.🙂
    Sommergrüße an der Küste aus der Großstadt,
    Jürgen

    Like

    • Guten Tag, lieber Jürgen,
      ja der Queller ist etwas zum Knabbern und dann kann man nicht mehr aufhören.
      Ihn gibt es auch an Deutschlands Küsten.
      Herzliche Sommergrüße vom Meer an die Großstadt
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • Intressant, wenn ich später diesen Monat auf Amrum bin werde ich es ausprobieren! Danke!
      Jürgen

      Like

    • Amrum klingt toll, Jürgen! Bist du schon öfters dort gewesen?
      Ein schönes Wochenende dir aus Fredrikstad und toi, toi, toi für Sonntag!
      Dina

      Like

    • Dear GPCox,
      it took Siri and Selma quite some research and in the end they found out that you find samphire at the US coast as well. In Florida f.e. you find the Samphire Keys and we suppose you will find samphire there. In California samphire is known as well. So we suppose you find it all along the Pacific and Atlantic coast.
      All the best from Norfolk and Norway
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • Thank very much for getting back to me so quickly, Klausbernd. Please tell Siri and Selma that I appreciate their hard work.
      GP Cox

      Like

    • Dear GP Cox,
      our dear Bookfayries Siri and Selma like those researches and I was curious as well.
      Have a relaxed day.
      All the best to the other side of the big ocean
      Klausbernd

      Like

    • Dear Gallivanta,
      Siri and Selma found it too that samphire grows in New Zealand as well. But they couldn’t find out if is this marsh samphire which is so tasty. All samphire is eatable, we suppose, but the marsh samphire is the yummy one. As we saw from your link you find this marsh samphire at many places in New Zealand. So we wish you happy samphire picking🙂
      Good luck and all the best from the samphire coast
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  24. Unter der Bedingung, dass diese grünen salzigen säulenartigen Gebilde jung und schön machen, würde ich sie gerne einmal kosten….Amazing, dass sie so unscheinbar und anspruchslos vor sich hin gedeihen…
    Vielen Dank für diese wundersame Erweiterung unseres Speiseplans, macht neugierig!
    Nebenan sind schon wieder ein paar Wilde, die tanzen lernen wollen oder was auch immer. Muss dann mal rüber…..
    Herzliche Grüße und Danke, tolle Fotos!

    Like

    • Liebe Pia,
      klar doch, Samphire macht schön😉
      Er macht auch jung, da beim Sammeln die jugendliche Freude an Schlammschlachten wieder erwacht.
      Also, guten Appetit!
      Und vielen Dank fürs Kommentieren
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  25. Ganz schön verwirrend, wenn man die Pflanze googelt: Queller, Europäischer Queller, Seespargel, Meerfenchel, Crithmum, Salicornia… So viele Namen und irgendwie alles ähnlich, teils gleich und essbar. Hätte Shakespeare mal lieber auch den Spargel statt Fenchel gewählt…😉 Interessante Empfehlung jedenfalls, wenn ich mal wieder ans Meer komme, dann werde ich das probieren (und der Bestellung hinzufügen: “Aber nicht von dem Zeug, was Shakespeare damals hatte!”).

    Liebe Grüße
    ulli

    Like

    • Liebe Ulli,
      genau! Lass dir keinen Rock Samphire andrehen, Marsch Samphire muss es sein😉
      Ja, ja, das mit all den Namen hat uns auch verwirrt, als wir das deutsche Wort für die Übersetzung suchten. Unser Lexikon gab Salz-Alant an, noch so ein Begriff, den keiner von uns je gehört hatte.
      Lass dich nicht verwirren, europäischer Queller oder Seespargel ist wohl die geläufigste Bezeichnung für Samphire.
      Dann guten Appetit und liebe Grüße
      die Fab Four von der Quellerküste und aus Norwegen

      Like

    • Dass mit der Tangente ließ uns lange lachen. SUPER!
      So richtig nach unserem Geschmack!
      🙂🙂🙂🙂

      Like

  26. Eilnachricht zwischendurch❗️
    Ein Mann 🏃 aus East Anglia hat den Ausgang des Fußballspiels gestern richtig in einem Wettbüro getippt und seinen Einsatz von 5 GBP verfünfhundertfacht. 👍 gut, nicht! Unsere Gratulation 💐

    Like

    • Cool, 5 auf 7 zu 1….!
      Frustrierte Fans haben Jonas die Beifahrer-Scheibe eingeschlagen….eine ganz Straße in Frankfurt musste dran glauben…..
      Hoffe, die übertreiben es nicht wieder so beim nächsten Mal mit den Toren!
      Zu viel Emotion, brrrrrr!
      Oder der alte Trick, Brot und Spiele und das Böse kann unbemerkt schalten und walten…..
      Egal, Ersatzscheibe ist bestellt!
      Liebe Grüße

      Like

    • Liebe Pia,
      beim Fußball wird das alte panem et circensis zelebriert, obwohl es in Deutschland seit einiger Zeit in ist, dass kultivierte Leute vorgeben, sich für Fußball zu interessieren. Hier in England ist es anders: Fußball spaltet im gewissen Sinne die Gesellschaft. Die einen sind fanatische Anhänger, die anderen überhaupt nicht daran interessiert. Zu welcher Gruppe man gehört, ist eine Frage der Schichtzugehörigkeit.
      Das ist ja völlig verrückt, nun sind wir vom Samphire auf den Fußball gekommen. Übrigens bei uns Fab Four scheiden sich auch die Geister am Fußball: Dina und Selma sind fußballinteressiert, Siri und mich lässt Fußball völlig kalt, uns ist es schnurzpiepe, wer wo wie spielt. Eigentlich finden wir Fußball langweilig. Wir verfolgen dagegen eifrig das Segeln und schauen fast jede Stunde aufgeregt auf die Karte, wer die erste Etappe des Tall Ship Race gewinnt. Wir tippten beide auf die britische Sloop “Gigi”, allerdings auch die polnische “Spaniel” liegt nicht schlecht im Rennen. So hat eben jeder seins …
      Liebe Grüße auch an deine Kiddies von der Quellerküste
      Klausbernd🙂

      Like

    • In Norwegen gucken wir ALLE Fußball am Sonntag und drucken D ganz fest die Daumen! Siri und Selma, Ja auch Siri(!) kreuzen ihre Flügel und hoffen auf viele Tore.🙂🙂🙂
      Liebe Grüße zu dir aus Fredrikstad, liebe Pia
      Wir wünschen euch eine schönes Wochenende!
      Dina & co❤

      Like

    • Danke liebe Dina für die Grüße! Morgen mittag zeigen wir unter anderem den Tanz der Vulkangöttin Pele auf dem Berliner Platz in der Innenstadt, danach schauen wir Fußball….
      Dir auch ein wunderschönes Wochenende und eine gute Zeit in Norwegen!
      Umarmung von Pia

      Like

  27. Habe ich bisher weder gesehen, noch habe ich jemals etwas davon gehört. Man lernt doch nie aus😀 Das scheint ja eine kleine universell einsetzbare Leckerei zu sein🙂 Danke dafür, dass Ihr mich wieder ein wenig klüger gemacht habt.
    Liebe Grüße von der Silberdistel

    Like

    • Guten Tag, liebe Silberdistel,
      ja, den Queller kann man zu Vielem reichen oder auch ‘pur’ essen. Bis vor kurzem war er völlig unbekannt in der Küche außer in East Anglia und in Norddeutschland. Allmählich scheint er jedoch in Mode zu kommen. Wir wundern uns immer, wie auch Lebensmittel den Moden unterworfen sind.
      Ganz liebe Grüße von der Samphire-Küste
      die Fab Four von Cley

      Like

  28. LLLLOVE samphire🙂 gorgeous with a squeeze of lemon a drizzle of butter some black pepper and homemade fish pie or fishcakes to accompnay🙂 yummy .
    Do hope there’s not a rush now on it in the local supermarket …😉 Lol the Delia effect … I’ve never seen it growing ….
    Great post and pictures Dina and Klaus and Book Faeries of course !

    Like

    • Dear Poppy,
      greetings from Poppyland🙂
      Thanks a lot. You seem to be a samphire-lover as well.
      You can see the samphire growing in the saltmarshes at area between high and low water. Usually it’s quite muddy there, therefore it’s best to look at it and pick it from a boat. We always go out with our boat for samphire picking.
      Lots of Love
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  29. Well Bookfayries i’m pleased to report that i’ve tasted the “Kiss of a Mermaid”!! And it was paired with fish. Must compliment you on the diverse range of subjects covered here in the blog🙂 I love the photos and the info; that looks like a unique marshy environment with rich pickings. Best wishes, Liz.

    Like

    • Dear Liz,
      thank you very much🙂
      Our beloved Master and we Bookfayries write about everything that interests us in our world and, of course, to the pictures that our dearest Dina took. We love literature but we are not that removed that we will not we pick topics from our from every day life in Norfolk. It`s great that you like it🙂 We sometimes ask ourselves what is the subject of our blog. It’s quite subjective: everything we are interested in and everything we want to know more about it. But whatever subject we write about we try to make a connection to literature. Last not least the North – and we include North Norfolk into the North – is one of our main themes too. All our blogs deal with the North and/or literature. And we see our blog as a chance to extend our knowledge, writing it and reading and answering the comments.
      All the best
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  30. Delicious! Also found in Dorset and (where I have just returned from) Cornwall. I love it in North Norfolk when small cottages have bunches of samphire outside on a ‘trust the buyer’ basis… RH

    Like

    • In Cley the tiny shedtables with samphire and honestyboxes are to be found on every corner, I love them too!🙂 Great to read from you again, RH, I hope you and Mrs RH an your little princesses, the mini RHs are fine and enjoying the great summer.
      Apparently you can buy samphire in almost any good stocked supermarket now, this is quite new to us. The further away from the coast you get, the more the price rises. We got a pound super fresh samphire for 2 GBP last week, that’s hard to beat, but obviously it’s much more fun going out with boat picking them yourself.
      Have a lovely weekend!
      Dina – and Klausbernd and the girls says hello too🙂

      Like

  31. OMG, wonderful post. I have no idea about samphire, in my country there are some kinds of seaweed but not like this one. We use our seaweeds to make beverage (mix them with tea, cook them with dry lotus seeds…), dishes (sweet soups, eat fresh…). I have never try samphire (hardly have a chance) but your blog post is great and provide me with interesting knowledge. I love your blog, keep following your new posts🙂

    Like

    • Dear Vothikhanh,
      thank you so much for your kind words🙂 We are very very Happy about them🙂
      With samphire you cannot make drinks – at least I have never heard of samphire drinks. Interesting what you do with seaweeds in Vietnam. We are not that creative in Merry Old England😉
      We wish you a great weekend
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • ❤ I love to learn about different cultures. It's a precious gift to live in the world with many wonderful people who share their lifestyle and knowledge willingly

      Like

  32. You have convinced me, I MUSt try samphire with fish the next time I get to the coast. Wonderful photos and a deligthful post, you Fab Four!
    Best regards, Sarah

    Like

    • Dear Robert,
      thank you very very much🙂 You made our day!
      Oh dear, we have to finish blogging on our dear Master’s computer because he just came home and wants to write to his beloved Dina who is in Fredrikstad. She is just sailing around the harbour photographing these tall ships coming in.
      We wish you a great weekend
      Siri and Selma🙂🙂 sending you fairy dust

      Like

    • My pleasure, I’m glad I made your day! My regards to Dina, the tall ships sounds quite exciting. It was always a dream of mine to go on a ship like this. Have you seen “Master and commander”? Nejoy your weekend here and there.🙂

      Like

  33. Hallo, der arme König Lear, erst im Sterben erkennt er den wahren “Wert” seiner Tochter: And to deal plainly, I fear I am not in my perfect mind….
    Naja, auch das gilt es wohl nicht zu fürchten….
    Unter Beobachtung halten vielleicht.
    Also ist das Samphire Gemüse natürlich salzhaltig, toxische verkalkende Dickschädeligkeit verhindernd, das ist ja genial!
    Schönes Wochenende…

    Like

    • Auch dir ein schönes Wochenende, liebe Pia🙂
      Dina ist gerade damit beschäftigt, den großen Segelschiffen entgegen zu fahren, die in den Hafen einlaufen. Sie hat einen VIP-Ausweis als mehrsprachige Bloggerin bekommen und wird auf Schiffen eingeladen, kann die Kaptäns interviewen und was nicht alles. Ein wenig beneide ich sie schon und freue mich zugleich für sie.
      Ich werde mit Freunden hinausfahren, um Samphire sammeln – immerhin …
      Schönes Wochenende
      Klausbernd
      Ist es nicht so, dass bisweilen Väter den “Wert” ihrer Töchter zu spät erkennen?

      Like

  34. Wie riecht denn nach Genuß von Samphire das Pipi? Will doch mal sehen, ob mir der “Arme Leute Spargel” bei meinem Besuch in Norfolk begegnen wird. Schont vielleicht meine Reisekasse.

    Liebe Grüße an die Fab Four und herzlichen Dank für diesen informativen und Appetit machenden Artikel.

    Achim

    Like

    • Lieber Achim,
      es ist nicht wie beim Spargel, dass das Pipi eigenartig nach dem Genuss von Samphire riecht – zumindest ist mir das noch nicht aufgefallen.
      Samphire picking ist ein MUSS, wenn du an unserer Küste bist.
      Ich schrieb dir schon, dass du gerne vorbeikommen kannst. Ich bin die ganze Zeit bis zum 19. August hier und ab 14.8. ist Dina auch bei mir. Ab 20.8. sind wir allerdings unterwegs.
      Liebe Grüße aus dem sonnigen Cley, wo gerade eine mittelmeerhafte Atmosphäre herrscht,
      Klausbernd

      Like

  35. Lovely, lovely samphire…..so delicious with butter and pepper. Good with Asian flavours too…a little ginger, soya, sesame oil and toasted sesame seeds🙂
    It seems to grow all over UK, in muddy tidal estuaries…..but so popular now I even saw it for sale in our local Morrisons🙂
    Now I’m hungry!

    Like

    • Now that’s something new and a great tip indeed, Seonaid. I’ll try it the Asian way, sounds very yummy… Thank you.🙂

      Like

  36. Awesome photography as usual. Thanks for teaching me about the poor man’s asparagus. Oh yes the ground does look muddy indeed. You’d have to have been really hungry to wade in to collect. Thank God it’s now seen as a delicacy…

    Like

    • Thank you very much, dear Liz,
      For the Norfolk boys and girls it is normal but for the tourists it is a rare delicacy. But funnily enough you don’t find it in Supermarkets around here. Everybody buys it at those tiny stalls at the road side.
      Have a happy day
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  37. O.K. für den himmlischen Genuss wäre ich auch zu Schlammschlachten bereit…die Rezeptvorschläge hier klingen unwiderstehlich….
    muss man das Zeug schälen oder ist man die Stacheln mit?
    Liebe Grüße
    ..jetzt muss ich noch 2 Wochen unterrichten, es wird improvisiert…..zur Belohnung Obstsalat!

    Like

    • Liebe Pia,
      Da gibt es keine Stacheln, nur weiche Blätter, die sich um ein Skelett legen. Man kann das Skelett auch mitessen, aber ich finde es schöner, das Grüne mit den Zähnen abzuziehen. Im Grund ist das alles kinderleicht. Wenn du Samphire vor dir hast, ist es klar, wie er gegessen wird.
      Ganz liebe Grüße
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  38. I have come back several times to this post just to read the comments. I have never, ever heard of Samphire, even though King Lear is one of my favourite Shakespeare play. Thank you for another incredible post! Food is a hot topic these days This post reminded me of how our food choices and trends are changing dramatically as we move into a world that demands faster, simpler, shorter. The notion of a liquid meal replacement is gaining popularity and going mainstream. It is a way of minimizing effort and thought that goes into making a meal. Whether there is a reduction in nutrients is being debated.

    So, it is good to see that there is a resurgence of old traditions.

    Many hugs coming across the way to the Fab Four of Cley.

    Like

    • Good afternoon, dear Rebecca,
      thanks for your clever commentary🙂
      Eating samphire follows an old tradition on the one hand and on the other it quite modern as finger-food. I like so much that samphire is an unprocessed food. After all this samphire we are drowning in apples right now. There we follow the trend of liquid food: We were producing apple juice today the whole morning long. And we have to admit we rather drink our apples than eating them. And then we have too much cherry plums on our tree. Those we are eating right away from the tree und Siri and Selma are very lucky of being able to fly to the top of tree where the best plums are. After cherry plums and apples come the damsons and cooking apples and all those figs. It may sound great but it’s stress also. What to do with all these fruits? We cannot even give them away because all our neighbours are in the same situation.
      Anyway, it’s strange, isn’t it: the stress of the paradise😉
      … but very healthy …
      Many hugs from
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  39. Hallo zusammen,
    Euer informativer und interessanter Bericht über Salicornia hat mir sehr gefallen. Ich habe diesen Queller an den Etangs (Brackwasserseen) in der Camargue vor Jahren kennen gelernt. Allerdings habe ich ihn noch nie gegessen. Es herrscht dort eine spezielle und karge Flora vor, gedeihen doch salz-und wassertolerante Pflanzen. Besonders der Europäische Queller (Salicornia) bevorzugt salzhaltigen nassen Schlick oder Sand und wächst hier an diesen Etangs.
    Ein anderer deutscher Name ist Glasschmalz. Dieser Name rührt daher, dass früher die Asche dieser Pflanze zur Herstellung von Soda benutzt wurde. Diese Asche des Quellers brauchte man dann für die Glasherstellung.
    Wenn es euch interessiert, könnt ihr 2 Camargue-Berichte im Blog unter der Kategorie Reiseberichte/Reisebilder Provence/Korsika anschauen. Liebe Grüsse Ernst

    Like

    • Hallihallo, lieber Ernst,
      ich hatte gerade zwei Freunde vom Schwarzwald hier zu Besuch, die mir auch vom Queller in der Camargue erzählten. Sie hatten ihn dort gegessen und meinten, der schmecke genau wie der Samphire hier. Wie du schreibst, er wächst hier auf einem stark salzhaltigen Gemisch aus Sand und Schlick und steht bei den höheren Fluten um Neu- und Vollmond völlig unter Wasser.
      Danke für deine schönen Camargue-Berichte🙂
      An unserer Küste in North Norfolk kannst du danach gehen, wo es leichten Zugang zum Queller gab, gab es alte Glasindustrie.
      Liebe Grüße aus dem hochsommerlichen North Norfolk, wo einfach nicht regnen möchte. Unser Garten benötigt unbedingt Regen, aber nichts, immer nur Sonnenschein …
      the Fab Four of Cley
      🙂🙂🙂🙂

      Like

    • hab vielen Dank für deine Antwort und deine Ergänzungen. Wir haben im Moment abwechslungsreiches Regen- und Sonnenwetter, ideal also für den Garten und die Natur.
      Dieses Jahr ist ein speziell gutes Garten-, Beeren- und Früchtejahr. Wir ernteten Rekorde an Johannis-, Stachel- und Himbeeren. Ebenso gab es sehr viele Mirabellen, Kirschen und Aprikosen. Im Moment versuchen wir, den Zwetschgen “Herr” zu werden. Auch die Kiwi-Ernte im Oktober wird überdurchschnittlich gut sein. Zusammen mit lieben Grüssen schicke ich dir Regen nach Norfolk.

      Like

  40. I had never seen or heard of “samphire” before.
    Looks interesting! I do know what asparagus is and I love the taste ….so I would probably like samphire (IF I ever happen to come across it in this lifetime).

    Like

  41. Pingback: A Postcard from Polruan.. | Cornwall Photographic

  42. In Southeast Alaska we call it beach asparagus because it looks like tiny asparagus stalks. We would sit on the beach, legs outstretched, with knife in hand and cut them when they are about 3-4 inches in height. Needless-to-say, we all went home with wet bottoms. Then we would place them in a big pot with water, clean it and can it for winter. Sometimes we add red peppers to give it a nice contrasting color, maybe even a spot of vinegar and spices. It’s delicious with onions, ranch dressing and bacon. Yum!! It’s very high in vitamin C, I have been told and was and still is a staple for the Tlingit and Haida Natives in Southeast Alaska.

    Like

    • Thank you very, very much for all this information about Alaskan beach asparagus.
      You have to cut it with a knife, so I suppose this samphire has quite strong stems. We just pull the samphire out with its roots. I read about its high vitamin C content as well. The old Norfolk boys and girls pickle it too.
      All the best, have a happy week.
      Warm greeting to southeast Alaska from North Norfolk
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  43. That looks so delicious indeed and the photographs are out of this world! Stunning captures Dina! One day I will come and visit and that is the first dish I would order.😆

    Like

    • Sorry, liebe Ruth,
      irgendwie habe ich hier die Kommentare übersehen. Dennoch herzlichen Dank und ein schönes Wochenende dir.
      Ganz liebe Grüße
      Kram
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  44. I especially like the final two photographs in this collection. Funnily enough I’ve been having some lightly boiled samphire myself this weekend, as I was out picking some on Friday afternoon from a local salt marsh on Anglesey.

    Like

    • Thank you!
      We have it here with butter or pickled. We have to try it with a little bit of orange juice/orange zest. Thanks for giving us this idea.
      All the best
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • Thanks, dear Mike,
      scallops with samphire is great, I agree.
      Now we are at the end of the samphire season here.
      Have a nice weekend
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  45. Fantastic! I will look for it – not sure if we have it near here because the shorelines are often quite rocky…and oh those tiny potatoes, wow! Oh! I see just above a comment that someone has seen it on the e. coast of Vancouver Is., not too far away.

    Like

    • Good morning dear Bluebrightly,
      there is actually rock samphire but that’s not so nice to eat. You find the best samphire in salt marshes, the yummy one🙂
      Good luck!
      Here it’s just the end of the samphire season. When it gets too old it’s getting hard and not so tasty anymore.
      All the best from
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • Dear Steve,
      thank you very much for commenting.
      I am pretty sure that they eat samphire at the Philippines. Well, in Texas it’s probably to hot for samphire.
      Have a happy weekend
      the Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  46. Great post! I never knew this could be eaten…we have it at my Grandmother’s old place on the coast, and I have always like the feel of it. Now I must try… Great photos, writing and explanation. Cheers!

    Like

  47. The story behind these figureheads are fascinating…being a dreamer of oceans and stories/novels of the sea, I wish all ships had figureheads as they are part of the character of the ship as well as those that man the ship. Wonderful post.

    Like

  48. Pingback: Sea of greens | Two to TÜ

  49. Pingback: A Bunch from The Salt Marshes | The World according to Dina

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: