A Sense of Wildness in Cley

This path takes you into the Cley Reserve, the oldest, best known and most visited nature reserve in Norfolk. For us, it’s a kind of songline transporting us into the heart of wild nature – our nature within and this around us. Well, Dina and our Master sometimes say that the last wildness is to be found within only. Do you agree?

Dieser Weg führt geradewegs ins Naturschutzgebiet von Cley, das älteste und besuchteste Landschafts- und Tierschutzgebiet Norfolks. Für uns ist er eine Art Pfad mitten ins Herz wilder Natur – der inneren und äußeren. Unsere geliebte Dina und Masterchen meinten neulich, die letzte Wildnis liegt nur noch in unserem Inneren. Meint Ihr das auch?Cley_Marshes

In Wilderness we get a feeling for life’s miracles
Siri and Selma

Our Wildness: A landscape of outstanding natural beauty, marshes, reed beds, shingle and sand and sky and sea. The land on the edge, how the author Richard Mabey discribes it in his autobiography “Home Country”: “the edge between humanity and nature“, running from Salthouse through Cley to Blakeney Point is hugely valued for its wild nature.

Unsere Wildnis: Eine Landschaft außerordentlicher Schönheit, Salzmarschen, Ried, Kies-und Sandstrände. Das Land am Ende der Welt, wie es der englische Autor Richard Mabey in seiner Autobiographie “Home Country” beschreibt, als Grenze zwischen menschlicher Welt und Natur, das sich von Salthouse durch Cley bis zur Haff-Nehrungsküste des Blakeney Points hinzieht, wird europaweit gelobt für seine (fast) reine Natur.

CleyMarshes03a

Real freedom lies in wildness, not in civilization
Charles Lindbergh

Jack Higgins describes our area: “It was a strange alien world of sea creeks and mudflats and great pale barriers of reeds higher than a man’s head, inhabited only by the birds, curlew and redshank and brent geese coming south from Siberia to winter on the mud flats.” Exactly this is our wilderness!

Der Autor Jack Higgins beschreibt die Gegend zwischen Cley und Blakeney: “Es war eine eigenartig fremde Welt  von Prielen und Watt und großen Barrieren vom fahlen, über mannshohem Ried, die nur von Vögeln bewohnt ist, vom Brachvogel und Rotschenkel und den Wildgänsen, die von Sibirien kommend im Watt überwintern“. Genau das ist unsere Wildnis!

CleyBeach03a

In literature wildness is the place to proof oneself. Opposite to culture it’s a challenge, the refugium of those who are afraid of people. To be alone in the wilderness you will find yourself or God what is the practice of many rites of initiation. The picture of the wild ist mostly an expression of the romantic idea of naturalness and absolute freedom. It fascinates all those who find people and their actions boring. 

In der Literatur ist die Wildnis meist der Ort, an dem man sich bewähren muss. Sie ist Herausforderung und der Gegensatz zur Kultur. Hierhin zieht sich der Menschenscheue zurück. Allein in der Wildnis findet man sich oder Gott. Darauf beruhten viele Initiationsriten. Die Wildnis als Bild ist meist der Ausdruck einer romantischen Idee von Natürlichkeit und absoluter Freiheit. Sie übte vor allem auf jene eine Anziehungskraft aus, die angesichts der Taten der Menschheit Langeweile empfinden.

From a little bit of wilderness with love
Mit naturschwärmerischen Grüßen

Siri 🙂 and :-)  Selma

 

© Text and illustrations, Hanne Siebers and Klausbernd Vollmar, Cley next the Sea, 2016

142 thoughts

  1. Fond memories of watching an incoming tide fill marshy areas. The menacing swirls of water around the “low tide islands”, and the thanks that I was not trapped on one of them… because there would be no escaping the incoming water. Desolation can certainly be dramatically beautiful, and very dangerous for the unwary!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Good morning,
      you are right besides its beauty our coast can be quite dangerous: strong currents and the water often comes in from your back.
      Wishing you a sunny day
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

    • I have seen the tide coming in when there has been a mist, so there are lots of moving water sounds from the mist, but could only see the immediate activity. Beautiful and disconcerting all at the same time!🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Dankeschön, liebe Laura,
      das ist hier in der Tat so eine Entspannungs-Seele-baumeln-lassen-Gegend.
      Mach’s gut, liebe Grüße vom kleinen Dorf am großen Meer
      Die Fantastischen Vier

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    • Good morning, dear Pete,
      what a gorgeos day, warm and sunshine.
      Thank you very much for your kind words🙂 especially as you know our area.
      Have a happy day
      The Fab Four of Cley xxxx

      Like

    • Dear Cindy,
      you made Dina’s day comparing her pictures with those of Wyeth🙂 We agree, Dina’s best pictures are like minimalist paintings.
      Thank you very much.
      We wish you all the best
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  2. Spectacular photography, Dina. We like “external” wildness because we think we can control the proximity, or be entertained by what we see. Internal – ah that is another matter altogether. Happy Monday from Vancouver. Hugs and love to my dear friends, the Fab Four of Cley.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Good morning our dear friend Clanmother
      we experience that the external wildness can be a key to our internal wildness. Being in the marshes sets us free, it is the best remedy against our blockages.
      With a big HUG from the sunny salt-marshes of North Norfolk.
      We wish you a very happy and sunny week
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂🙂🙂🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Good morning, dear Tish,
      thank you very much for your kind commentary.
      “Cley Quartet” reminds us on “The Alexandria Quartet” by Lawrence Durrell😉 Thanks for giving us this name🙂 We like Durrell’s novels very much and a friend of ours knew L. Durrell quite well and talked a lot about his time living with him.
      We wish you a sunny day
      The Cley Quartet

      Liked by 2 people

    • You have no idea how odd a congruity that is, Klausbernd. It was only yesterday that I remembered again (after years of forgetting) that I liked Lawrence Durrell. (It was The Labyrinth I first thought of) And then I wondered why I no longer had any of books. And thinking that I also needed to read the Alexandria Quartet, now – as a grown up person. Clearly, now that you, too, have raised his spirit, some re-reading is definitely called for. When I wrote Cley Quartet, I was also thinking of ‘Quartet in the key of Cley! Must be your mention of songlines. Song of the Earth.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Tish,
      my friend Martin, who wrote a novel about the life in Cley, talked quite a lot about L. Durrell but, I don’t know why, I never read his books until last year when I found all the novels of “The Alexandria Quartet” in one big volume on a jumble sale. I bought it and read it immediately. It reminded me partly of my hippie days living in groups. Martin met L. Durrell several times in Greece and Cyprus, where Durrell wrote the 4 novels of “The Alexandria Quartet” in the early fifties.
      Wishing you fun re-rading Durrell🙂
      Love
      Klausbernd

      Liked by 2 people

  3. quelle grandi nuvole bianche sembrano pressare il paesaggio, appiattendolo, immagini di grandissima suggestione e bellezza a rendere in pieno il senso della selvaggia natura, complimenti e saluti
    Annalisa

    Liked by 2 people

    • Good morning, dear Jo
      these are the secret documents of the Flat Earth Society😉
      Actually it isn’t that flat as it seems. Our hinterland is hilly, well, not high hills but about 100 m high.
      Thank you and lots of love from
      The Fab Four of Cley xxxx

      Liked by 2 people

    • Good morning, dear Jude,
      great that you like our blog🙂 Thank you.
      We need this feeling of freedom in the mashes. We couldn’t imagine living not next the sea.
      All the best
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

    • Good morning, dear Guni,
      what a surprise! Thanks for your kind words🙂
      Enjoy the sunshine, see you.
      Warm greetings to you, Dick and Quay
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • Dear May
      WOW! Thank you very much, we really feel honoured by the kind words of the Shieldmaiden🙂
      I like your article “The Sacred Feminine in Norse Mythology”. Thanks for all its information. A while ago I lectured and published about female pirates – in many respects quite similar … I wanted to write a comment there but unfortunately your blog didn’t like me😉
      All the best
      Klausbernd

      Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you Klausbernd. Oh my, I am quite sorry about the blog glitch… I wonder if there is anything I can do to fix it.
      I am grateful for your kind words on the Sacred Feminine in Norse Myths. I enjoy the topic very much and I am curious about the angle covering female pirates:) I can imagine what the similarities might be.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear May,
      I don’t know if you read German. You can find this article about female piracy on my blog
      https://kbvollmar.wordpress.com/artikelpiraterie/
      It’s the long article there.
      No, there is nothing to fix on your blog. I suppose it’s a problem of mine. When I am asked to enter my PIN I end up on my blog again.
      I really like you blog and your text about Norse mythologies. Actually our blog here is quite influenced by these ideas as well because Dina is Norwegian and I have not only lived in the North for quite a while but I studied old Norse and nordic literature. North Norfolk, where we live, was a stronghold of the Vikings under Canute the Great.
      All the best
      Klausbernd

      Liked by 1 person

    • Out there in the salt-marshes and on the beaches we become very small and we suppose that’s healing.
      Thanks for commenting.
      All the best
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  4. Die Fotos erwecken Sehnsuch nach dieser wilden Natur, die uns so gut gefallen und beeindruckt hat, du hast sie vortrefflich festgehalten, Hanne! Ihr habt euch einen schönen Ort zum Leben ausgesucht, Klausbernd und Hanne!
    Grüße aus dem heute grauen Berlin von Susanne und Micha

    Liked by 2 people

    • Guten Morgen liebe Susanne und lieber Micha,
      von den Maschen wieder zurück in Berlin. Es war schön mit euch und nun wünschen wir euch wieder gutes Einleben in der Großstadt.
      Vom sonnig warmen Cley ganz liebe Grüße
      Hanne und Klausbernd
      und auch von uns: Siri und Selma, die fröhlichen Buchfeen

      Like

    • Nach all den Jahren finden wir es immer noch toll hier – besonders heute bei frühsommerlichen Sonnenschein🙂
      Ganz liebe Grüße und vielen Dank dir
      Die Famosen Vier

      Like

  5. This is absolute magnificent. You turn the reserve into a magical, mythical place with your sense for words and beautiful images. Bravo!
    Sarah x

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Excellent images, a place for contemplation as many writers have discovered. Have you read WG Sebald’s ‘Rings of Saturn’? And Larkin’s description of Holderness seems to fit:

    Loneliness clarifies. Here silence stands
    Like heat. Here leaves unnoticed thicken,
    Hidden weeds flower, neglected waters quicken,
    Luminously-peopled air ascends;
    And past the poppies bluish neutral distance
    Ends the land suddenly beyond a beach
    Of shapes and shingle. Here is unfenced existence:
    Facing the sun, untalkative, out of reach.

    from ‘Here’

    Liked by 2 people

  7. What a prfect combination of moving text and photos. It looks like the ultimate place to connect with you inner wildness. Or maybe your inner peace?
    Wouldn’t it be nice if we all had a Songline to like this to the nature of our hearts.
    Thank you.
    Best regards,
    John

    Liked by 2 people

    • Hi, dear John,
      maybe there is a songline for everyone but one has to find it.
      Inner wildness and inner peace seem to us close connected, the different sides of the same coin.
      Thanks and all the best
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • Guten Tag, liebe Maren,
      ach, wir sind doch nicht Gallien zur Zeit von Asterix 😉
      Keine Angst, die Wolken bleiben schön oben. Dafür sorgen schon Siri und Sema, denn das ist magisches Feenwerk.
      Ganz liebe Grüße aus dem sonnigen Cley – wolkenloser Himmel gerade
      Dina und ich
      Klausbernd🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  8. A wonderful post with beautiful words and photographs. It gave me a gentle nudge as to the inspiration nature provides for us and how the wilderness helps us to connect with our true being. Thank you for sharing.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Davy
      you are very welcome. We are happy that you like our blog🙂
      We think, if we would loose the wilderness outside we would getting problems to relate to the wilderness within and our true being.
      Wishing you an easy week
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  9. Hallo Ihr Lieben,
    stimmt: bei diesen Bildern kann man wirklich ins Schwärmen geraten. Ganz herzlichen Dank und ein dickes Lob and Dina “Fotofee”! 🙂 Sie hat Eure Wildnis ganz fantastisch in Szene gesetzt.
    Liebe Grüße ins kleine Dorf am groszen Meer, auch an den Master und an die “Fotofee”,
    Pit

    Liked by 2 people

    • Na ganz herzlichen Dank, lieber Pit.
      Da sich Dina aber gefreut🙂 und unsere liebklugen Buchfeen gleich mit🙂🙂
      Wir senden dir und Mary gaaaanz liebe Grüße vom sonnigen, aber noch ziemlich kühlen Meer
      Die Famosen Vier
      Mach’s gut🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  10. The wilderness gives nothing but offers everything.
    As you have ocean trails in your back yard, I have mountain trails in mine. The challenge at times is to not slip so deeply into one’s thoughts that you lose sight of what surrounds you. You once posted about lucid dreaming. On the trail, I strive for almost the opposite, a sort of dreamy lucidity. Some would call it oneness or walking meditation. Awareness without thought or judgment or analysis.
    I enjoy a sunny day at the beach as much as anyone, but on those darker days, when the saltwater and the sky mix, like rain on smoked glass, I feel a certain exhilaration. Of course, these adventures are often followed by a warming of the cheekbones behind an inch of storm glass and a warm cup of coffee in a local seaside diner.🙂
    Another fine post from the Fab Four.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Thorsaurus
      thank you very much for your so well formulated commentary. Great!
      I have to admit I sometimes need half an hour or longer to stop my inner monologue when I am walking in the marches. It’s a kind of fight to empty myself. But I welcome this getting empty, it’s a necessary clesasig process. As you write, it’s all about a non-judgemental awareness which comes easier, at least to me, if I am confronted with more or less real wilderness. Wilderness is a strong stimulus from the outside which helpsme to be in the here and now. When I have walked for hours on the beach f.e. and I am near exhaustion then this non-judgemental awareness takes over quite easily. Unfortunately it never comes automatically I have do to something to arive at that state of consciousness. But too much doing blocks it.
      You might remember that we once blogged about Gurdjieff. I suppose this efford of getting free from judgements, of just be, is what he meant with his “fight against sleeping”.
      Thanks again and have a great rest of the week
      Klausbernd
      Warm greetings from the rest of our gang🙂🙂🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you for your kind words. Sam Harris, in his book “Waking Up”, comments on Douglas Harding’s idea of looking at the world as if you have no head. Quirky as it sounds, it can be an effective trigger to slip out of yourself on those days where you find it difficult to do so. Have a happy headless weekend.🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Thorsaurus,
      thanks for this tip! Especially our dear Master is interested in such books.
      “Looking as if you have no head” makes very much sense, at least for us Bookfayries.
      Our Saturday has been headless working in our garden in brightest sunshine🙂
      A GREAT weekend for you as well
      Siri & Selma and Dina
      Kind regards from our Master too, he is still in the garden-no, not working but having his closing time drink🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you very much🙂
      Do come to Cley often?
      Well, lavender and Cley that goes well together.
      With warm greetings from the cold sea
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • Dear Otto,
      you are very welcome to visit us🙂 We are sure you will like it here.
      This openness of the landscape helps for an inner openness as well. Always lots of skye …
      But, of course, every photograph is an idealised picture of reality (what ever that is).
      Thanks and all the best
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

    • Well, I would call the intend of the photographer an ideal. For Immanuel Kant and his followers f.e. Schiller the ideal is the individual intend. Maybe my way of thinking was too much influenced from the German philosophy of enlightenment. But there are many definitions of ideal, for Hegel it was an abstract idea, nothing to do with pictures, and for many of the classic Greek philosophers it was perfection. Actuall a dazzling notion this word “ideal”.

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    • I guess I thought of the word ideal more in the Greek tradition—as something positive. What I meant then, is that a photograph can also be a defective representation of the world. Which of course is still ideal in a Kant-ish understanding of the word.

      Liked by 2 people

    • This is a great topic …
      We Bookfayries and our Master think: The photographer doesn’t represent the world but he represent his view – a kind of defective representation as you call it. And as more he is aware of the subjectivity of his view as bigger the chance is that he is able to produce artistic pictures.
      Wishing you a sunny weekend
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • I agree; great topic. And I totally agree with you. The photographer doesn’t create a representation of the world, but his own view. Nevertheless he—or she—does cut a slice of the world to represent this view. Have a great weekend all of you, too.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Sue,
      thank you very much.
      It took our dear Master quite a while to find that phrase – you must know, he loves language and finding the best phrases. But that’s not that easy because he is not a native speaker. But he tries and we Bookfayries and Dina help him.
      Lots of love from the little village next the big sea
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

    • THANK YOU🙂
      Maybe sometimes it’s even easier to find the perfect expression in another language because one is not blogged by conventional expressions. We Bookfayries noticed this when Dina speaks German. Her German expressions are much more creative and to the point than these of our Master being a native speaker.

      Liked by 1 person

    • I think that’s a really good point. I’m always complaining about how cliched a lot of everyday speech and writing have become (and how people mix cliches together until their speech is almost meaningless). But of course, learning a new language avoids a lot of the background speech “hum” that native speakers just grow up with. Happy Weekend Fab Four.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. In meinem Kopf wechseln sich gerade die Wörter, Reinheit, Wildniss, Langeweile ab….wenn es rein und wild, also ursprünglich ist, kann es unmöglich langweilig sein…nur für Menschen, die nicht genau hinschauen….
    Einmal unterhielt ich mich mit einer Frau, die einen ganz wichtigen Job hatte, sie bildet “Erzieher” aus. Sie meinte: Menschen machen ganz großartige Dinge!
    Ich war nämlich in Zweifel, ob das stimmt…ich erklärte ihr, dass ich inzwischen viel lieber nach den Dinge schaue, die nicht von Menschen gemacht sind.
    Sie: Wieso, was meinen sie denn? Ich: Schauen sie mal, den Baum da drüben, den Himmel da oben, die Farben, die Wolken…
    Sie hatte das alles vor lauter Wichtigkeit ihrer Arbeit vergessen…..
    Ist es so, zerstören wir, was wir nicht verstehen und kontrollieren können?!
    Es ist unglaublich, was man in Cley alles ( wieder ) entdecken kann, wenn man Zeit dazu hat!
    Herzliche Grüße von Pia und ein großes Dankeschön und Kompliment für diesen tollen Post, ihr habt es sooooooo schön!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Guten Tag, liebe Pia,
      zu diesem Thema schrieb Thorsaurus und ich etwas zu dessen Kommentar.
      Wir sind of in Gedanken ganz woanders und gar nicht da, nicht im sogenannten Hier und Jetzt – wenn das auch eine abgedroschene Phrase ist.
      “Achtsamkeit” scheint mir der Schlüssel zu sein.
      Liebe Grüße
      Die Famosen Vier, die sich schon auf deinen Besuch freuen

      Liked by 1 person

    • Also ich freue mich auch sehr! Mit Hilfe dieser genialen Fotos kann ich schon mal die alten inneren Songlines bearbeiten, damit Platz für Neues ist..
      Alphaville: “Forever young”, Nik Kershaw: “I won’t? Let the sun go down on me” (nicht zu verwechseln mit Eltons: Don´t let the sun go down on me) Xavier: “Dieser Weg”, der Dauerbrenner: “Follow the yellow brick road”, da funkt manchmal “If my friends could see me now” dazwischen..ganz gemein…”Papa was a rolling stone”….
      “Purple Rain” war in den letzten Wochen auch oft dabei, wegen der Farbe…
      Es gibt übrigens ein ganzes Ballett nur mit Prince Liedern, das mich vor Jahren sehr beeindruckte…

      Ja und so freue ich mich darauf bald in Cley zu spazieren und vor mich hin zu chanten, Life´s a dream, live a dream, Dreamsongs gibt es schon einige!
      Zum Glück, die Vögel sind geduldig, wenn ich sie nerve mit Gesang, können sie auch weg fliegen, höher steigen, sie sind frei!
      Ach da kommt mir noch in den Sinn: Wes Brot ich ess, des Lied ich sing…
      Herzliche Grüße von Pia, es ist ja alles Schwingung, sollten wir mal versuchen zu verstehen, finde ich, dann könnten wir die Handys wegschmeißen…

      Like

    • Guten Morgen, liebe Pia,
      die Vögel werden sich sicher an deinem Gesang erfreuen. Da sind wir uns sicher!
      Wir fahren jetzt auf Wunsch von Siri und Selma zum Blumenfest in Felbrigg, eine Art Schloss mit tollem Garten in der Nähe hier.
      Wir wünschen dir ein wunderbares Wochenende
      Die amosen Vier

      Like

  12. It’s a wonderful term “songline,” tying one’s heart’s nature to nature outside. Is the greater wilderness within? Certainly, there’s wildness in there. I’m reminded of the setting of bonfires in The Return of the Native. Those tall fires celebrate an untamed time and match (I think) the unruly parts within the characters. Yes, the wilderness within. Higgins is certainly a skillful word-crafter. This phrase is marvelous: “great pale barriers of reeds.” Simply as an example, since there’s so much more. The photographs, too, take me where you are. Thanks for putting together and sending us this experience!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you very much for your great commentary🙂
      Maybe the real wildness, which is left, can only be found within. But on the other hand, we ask ourselves, do we want the real wildness? Can we bear it? And the more basic question: What is real wildness?
      Higgins wrote “The Eagle Has Landed” partly in Blakeney, our next village. The church in this novel is Cley church. Staying in Blakeney Hotel he used to walk through the marshes from there to Cley Church (an hours walk one way).
      Have a happy evening
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Truels,
      do you know that we have something in common?
      Norfolk was part of the Viking Empire ruled by the Danish in the early middle ages. Especially North Norfolk is not that different from Western Jutland.
      Thanks and have a happy day
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • Dear Chillbrook,
      thank you very much🙂
      As we have such a great weather right now we are off hiking in the salt marshes and on the beach🙂
      All the best to you from
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  13. Oh, I don’t think wilderness is just fascinating for those who find people boring – I think it’s more a fundamental need. To be unconnected to wilderness is to gradually lose something important, though one may not be able to sense just what was lost. To connect with it is deeply satisfying, and again, often beyond words. The healing power of it is immense.
    I like Mabey’s “edge” quote – things happen on the edges, don’t they? Beautiful photographs!

    Liked by 2 people

    • We don’t think that all people liking to be in the wildernes finding pople boring, but those who explore the wilderness on themself quite often having problems with social communication.
      We agree, things are happening on the edges. We need edges to develop.
      Have a happy weekend
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  14. Bei solch fantastischen Bildern kann man nur ins Schwärmen geraten. Um auf Eure Frage zurückzukommen, da liegt sie doch, die Wildnis – also doch nicht nur in unserem Inneren😉
    Liebe Grüße schickt Euch die Silberdistel

    Liked by 2 people

    • Guten Morgen, liebe Silberdistel,
      da hast du schon Recht, aber was vor der eigenen Haustüre liegt, übersieht man häufg.
      Wir wünschen dir noch einen wunderschönen Sonntag.
      Mit lieben Grüßen aus der Wildnis
      die Famosen Vier

      Like

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  17. Moin.
    „Mit naturschwärmerischen Grüßen” – diese Grußformel habe ich noch nicht gehört. Aber passt!
    Dem Text, “Herausforderung und der Gegensatz zur Kultur … usw.”, kann ich nur zustimmen. Die von euch beschriebene Gegend erinnert mich an Nord-Westfehmarn, mit seinem Haff- und Huk-Bereich, dem Salz- und dem Binnensee, nördlich von Westermarkelsdorf. Mittlerweile ist dieser Inselteil ein rund 750 ha großes Naturschutzgebiet. Selbst wenn Fehmarn sonst den Charme der frühen 70er versprüht, ist das gut so. Gut wenn die Natur geschützt und sich selbst überlassen wird, bleibt. Ich bin immer wieder mal gerne dort.
    https://svenmeierx.wordpress.com/2016/03/29/ostern-montag-fehmarn/
    Dort sind kaum Touristen, dafür Natur pur. Das sind für mich die Momente zum Abschalten vom Alltäglichen. An der Nachhaltigkeit arbeite ich noch😉
    Na denn, bis später wieder – lasst uns die Natur – oder was davon noch übrig ist – genießen!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Moin, moin,
      Danke für den Fehmarn-Tipp. Da sind wir noch nie gewesen. Vor vielen Jahren, als wir diesen Blog begannen, haben wir Urlaub auf Amrum gemacht und zwar im November. Das hat uns sehr gut gefallen. Die deutsche Küste kannten wir zuvor fast gar nicht.
      Heute werden wir in schönste designte Natur gehen, uns ein Meer von blauen Glockenblumen im Wald eines Landhauses begucken, in dem übrigens Anne Boleyn, eine Frau Heinrichs VIII. geboren wurde. Und dort, wo die Glockenblumen sich wie ein Teppich ausbreiten, soll es auch spuken!
      Liebe Grüße vom sonnigen Meer
      die Famosen Vier

      Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Elizabeth
      thank you for commenting🙂
      It’s the vasteness we love here and can’t miss anymore!
      Have a happy day
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Like

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  19. Words and pictures together bring out the inner wilderness…The open landscape and the feel of the air rushing in your face…Mesmerizing photo and enchanting words…What can I say…but that You are fabulous.

    Like

  20. Pingback: Cley Marshes, Norfolk England – Zeichnungen und Fotos von M.Fanke und Susanne Haun | Susanne Haun

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