Brexit – Exit Oslo

This building is a roof, explains Renzo Piano
Where will our roof be after Brexit? is our question

Astrup fearnley Museum of Modern Art in Oslo by Hanne Siebers 2017

The air is rich with winter fog and cold, and grows even colder as we reach Oslo. We are on our way to the Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art, an architectural masterpiece by Renzo Piano. We want to visit the exhibition Murakami by Murakami, named “The World is made of Stories“. We all live in our stories, indeed. Our story right now makes us feel tense and preoccupied, it’s a story we don’t like. Why? We are Europeans living in England. The Brexit will force us to look for the next exit.
The sky is grey and sunless as we walk towards Tjuvholmen, a prime location on the waterside. Cley next the sea, where we live, is by no means reasonable priced, but Oslo is the world’s most expensive city, hence not an alternative for us – unfortunately.

Dank Renzo Pianos architektonischer Meisterleistung hat Norwegens Hauptstadt nach der grandiosen Oper einen zweiten Aufsehen erregenden, aber zurückhaltenderen Bau bekommen. Wir möchten die Austellung “Die Geschichte, in der wir leben” von Murakami besuchen.
Unsere Geschichte bedrängt uns gerade, da wir als Europäer in England uns vom Brexit bedroht fühlen. Wo ist der Exit vom Brexit fragen wir uns. Leider ist es Oslo nicht, denn Oslo ist schweineteuer, die teuerste Stadt der Welt. Wir Buchfeen fallen fast in Ohnmacht, wenn die Rechnung im Restaurant gereicht wird. Dina und Masterchen schütteln ihre Köpfe, was soviel bedeutet, dass Norwegen für uns als Wohnalternative zu England nach dem Brexit nicht in Frage kommt.

dsc_5538_Hanne Siebers

The museum ist a magnificent building. Its roof covers the building in an elegant bend like the sail of a surf board which lies on its mast. Renzo Piano explained “This building is a roof” to the creme de la creme of the art world at the opening. The roof shelters light spacious exhibition halls and a few darker ones, as well as offices of lawyers to pay the bills.
Are you wondering how the inside looks like? Wait for our next post.

Zurück zum Museum. Ein Prachtbau ist es geworden. Sein Dach liegt gebogen über dem Gebäudekörper wie das Segel eines Surfbretts, wenn dieses auf den Gabelbaum liegt. Oder wie es Renzo Piano vor den erlesenen Eröffnungsgästen formulierte: “This building is a roof“. Dieses Dach beschützt lichte große Ausstellungsräume und ein paar weniger helle sowie – schließlich muss das Gebäude finanziert werden – Büros, in die sich eine Anwaltskanzlei eingemietet hat.
Neugierig geworden, wie es innen aussieht? Da müsst ihr auf unsere nächste Post warten.

dsc_5561_Hanne Siebers

First we have to get used to the unconventional rooms. Piano explains: “One can’t just make white boxes which kill art“. And what we like most, he was saying at the opening also: “art makes better people“.
Exactly!” we Bookfayries agree with all our heart.

Wir müssen uns erst an die ungewöhnlichen Räume gewöhnen. Piano erklärte seine Idee: “Man kann nicht einfach weiße Boxen machen, die bringen die Kunst um.” Und schließlich sagte er in Oslo auch: “Kunst macht aus Menschen bessere Menschen.
Genau!“, da stimmen wir beiden Buchfeen mit dem Brustton unserer Überzeugung zu.

dsc_5570

We leave the exhibition of Takashi Murakamis colourful pictures in a good mood. Everything was fine, the building is great and the pictures cheerful and funny. Though there is still the question unanswered in which story we will live next.

Die Ausstellung von Takashi Murakamis bunten Bildern hat uns richtig gute Laune gemacht. Was will man noch mehr, das Gebäude ist sehenswert, die Bilder heiter und lustig. Dennoch bleibt unsere Frage, in welcher Geschichte wir demnächst leben werden.

dsc_5546_kl

The pop art inspired painter Takashi Murakami isn’t related to the postmodern author Haruki Murakami, but he wrote a book as well. Its title The Meaning of the Nonsense of the Meaning made us curious.

Übrigens ist der von der Pop Art inspirierte Maler Takashi Murakami nicht mit dem postmodernen Autor Haruki Murakami verwandt, aber er schrieb ebenfalls ein Buch, dessen Titel The Meaning of the Nonsense of the Meaning uns neugierig gemacht hat.

With love from Oslo
Mit liebe Grüßen aus Oslo

Siri and Selma, etwas bedrückt

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© Text and illustrations, Hanne Siebers and Klausbernd Vollmar, Cley next the Sea, 2017

Follow Dina- Hanne Siebers on Instagram!

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406 thoughts

    • Dear John,
      it’s very complicated as I have a Norwegian passport and I don’t live 100% (but more than 50% which is also a vital point) permanently in England.
      Our plans were that I should move from Germany (where I lived and worked for 35 years as an European) and live permanently in Cley as from 2018. It’s very uncertain if this will be possible now and we have to be prepared to make a move.
      The current verdict is:
      “The rights of EU citizens living in the UK are not guaranteed and would be part of the negotiation with Europe in the event of a Brexit.
      It is almost certain that non-British citizens who had the right to live and work in the UK would need documentation to prove their rights beyond an exit.”
      If I give up my address in Germany, I’ll need some sort of guarantee for the future in the event that I’d be in need of any help. I don’t need any help today, money or health wise, but nobody knows what the verdict will be after Brexit.
      Sunny greetings from Oslo,
      Dina

      Liked by 4 people

    • So einfach ist das leider nicht. 😉
      In Großbritannien gibt es keine Aufenthaltsgenehmigung vergleichbar mit Deutschland. Klausbernd ist als Deutscher ebenfalls betroffen.
      Liebe Grüße zu dir aus Norwegen! 🙂

      Like

    • Good morning, dear John,
      it’s not only what Dina has explained, it’s also that populism is in the rise in Britain. Actually not so much where we live because it’s area with highly educated people and quite a lot don’t need to work and some have never really needed to work in their life. These people were mostly and still are against the Brexit. But there are big not so privileged groups who are against all foreigners. The political climate has drastically changed and the UK is in danger to become totally dependant on the US. We don’t want to live in country going in this direction.
      Wishing you a happy weekend
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 5 people

    • Complicated indeed. I wish you the best. ‘Perhaps’ the various populist movements are an unplanned but necessary test to see if our parliamentary/constitutional republic (U.S.)/democracy governments can survive. I certainly hope they can. I’ve never seen people at such polar extreme opposites from each other, swaying from far-left to far-right and back and forth, never settling or mixing somewhere in the middle. To be continued…

      Liked by 3 people

    • Dear John,
      I fully agree with you. I suppose it’s time to rethink our idea of democracy in the world that can easily be manipulated by modern media.
      Have a happy weekend
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

    • J > The educated liberal classes, worldwide, have for a log time got used to moulding the world according to their own ideals. Some might say this was arrogant, but certainly I would say naive. Naïve to expect that progress would not have to be guarded. “The price of Freedom is eternal vigilance “. The enemy of enlightenment is ignorance, and what have we really done to rid the world of it? We have just ghettoised ignorance, as we have also poverty. No, I’m not a socialist, just someone trying to understand how we got where we are, and appear to be going. BTW, the U.K. Has been through a comparable experience before, when we (strictly it was England) was isolated from most of Europe after the Reformation: and that heralded a golden era and 300yrs of growing prosperity. And BTW I voted Remain. I prefer to start with how things are, and hope AND work for the best possible outcome. UK is a nation of immigrants dating back millennia, and so it will remain.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Thank you very much for your comment that made me think 💭
      On one hand it reminds me on Hegel’s idea 💡 of dialectics as the way history is moving. This idea that Marx is referring to, one ruling class, as he is calling it, has to be replaced by another one. The intellectual liberal class has to be replaced by those who are kept in ignorance. One the other hand I suppose in a complex society, as we have it now, it needs a certain education and intellect to know what you are doing. I fully agree with you the basic problem of populism is the enormous split of those two groups, a split in education, chances and prosperity. When I came to England I was amazed how big this gap was and still is in the UK. And you are absolutely right that it is naiv to keep on going forever with this split. But a ruling class or group doesn’t like giving up ruling as already Machiavelli in The Renaissance made clear. Ruling blinds.
      Another problem here is arguing with history we both do. Can we really compare? I argue with the history in Germany 🇩🇪 and Italy 🇮🇹 at the beginning of WW II when the, I would called them ignorant, people voted for war. And this was the beginning of a politics of isolation. You argue of the times longer ago after the reformation when England had its great time. By the way I think 💭 it were the intellectuals of those times who were ruling. Anyway, the question is can we compare? And what means learning from history?
      You live on an island and I am born on the border to The 🇳🇱 Netherlands and I am brought up in Sweden 🇸🇪. Does Geography has such an impact on our way of thinking?
      Many question I can’t answer. Not to speak of the psychological questions of finding a scapegoat, the EU, or how we react when an old imperialistic glory has gone.
      Thanks 🙏 for your really interesting comment – and I naively thought this blog is mainly about art.
      Wishing you a great 👍 weekend and I will go on thinking
      Klausbernd

      Liked by 4 people

  1. Beautiful photos as always, but tinged with sadness at your comments surrounding the uncertainty. Oh dear how I hate this Brexit thing. As Brits living on the mainland of Europe we are not so uncertain as you, but it still affects us. I wish you well in your thoughts and possible actions.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Dear Denzil,
      thank you very much for your kind words.
      Well, as we wrote in the commentary above, it’s not only that we probably are pushed out of the UK, it’s the change in political climate in the UK as well – allthough we have to say, we don’t experience any animousity. Our neighbours and even civil servants are very friendly, they rather pity our situation.
      We wish you an easy weekend and we wish you all the best as well as British citizen living in the EU
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Hej Ihr (leise, traurig)! Das Versprechen unserer Generation: europäische Gemeinschaft zur Verhinderung von Krieg und seinen Folgen! KB weiss wovon ich spreche – wo ist dieser Gedanke und Wunsch hin? Am Wochenende nach Karneval fahr ich um mich nach möglichen, anderen Plätzen umzusehen obwohl es keinen Svexit gibt. Jede Generation verpasst irgendetwas. Unsere Elterngeneration verpassten die Schuldfrage. Die Gründer der EU die soziale Frage – warum auch immer merkantile Dinge so viel stärker wirken? Und Pfeffersäcke Länder regieren? Jetzt ist wohl Zeit für Brecht – merkwürdig unbekannt in Schweden.
    Und was verpassten wir? Ich kann es nicht sehen. So lang gekämpft für den Frieden unter Menschen/Völkern. Mir liegt das Verbindende immer noch am Herzen. Träumen so wichtig wie Handel(n)Verkaufen. Karl Kraus kommt auf den Nachttisch – wunderbare Gesamtausgabe von der WBG. Und was wird aus Mark Twain? Von vor Weihnachten? Auch viel Text. Vielleicht für Lichteres am Morgen. Amerika geht nicht unter?
    Trotz-dem: auch “papperslösa” wollen wissen welche schwedischen Füllwörter diese Sprache so unverständlich machen? Nicht JalaJala, nein “suck”. Det finns nog att betänka på. Moody – one home in England.
    Euch nun ein sonniges, wenn auch weniger sorgenfreies Karnevalswochenende – der jodesberger Karnevalsumzug am Sonntag im Karneval war der grösste Kulturschock meines Lebens nach einer hannoverisch/lutheranischen Erziehung – und der ist ja bekannter weise gar nichts gegen die Kölner Enthemmungen –
    auf jeden Fall und immer, immer wieder sonnige Grüsse aus dem Land der “besten” Lutheraner mit grosser Sehnsucht nach dem Rhein oder der Elbe. So ist das mit Meerjungfrauen, die das Meer verliessen. Sie können nur in der Aue oder im Moor überleben. Liebe Grüsse Ruth

    Liked by 3 people

    • Hallo, liebe Ruth,
      zunächst wenden wir uns einmal zur Hochzeit des Karnevals den närrischen Themen zu. Als Fast-Kölner sah ich gestern Abend die Mädchensitzung aus Köln. Besonders bei “De Frau Kühne” habe ich mich schief gelacht. Zugleich fiel mir auf, dass mir doch der englische Humor im Vergleich zum rheinischen sehr fremd ist. Und dass hier ein lauer Karneval im Sommer gefeiert wird, finde ich völlig daneben.
      Ja, der arme Brecht war sehr gebeutelt, öfter als die Schuhe die Ländern wechselnd wie er es in “Flüchtlingsgespräche” (?) ausdrückt, war er ja ständig auf der Flucht, bis er in den USA landete, wo er unglücklich war. Es ist erstaunlich, dass Brecht in Schweden nicht so bekannt ist, obwohl er doch in Skandinavien, Dänemark, Schweden und Finnland, auf seiner Fluch weilte. Von dem Blog her, hast du sicher gemerkt, dass ich nicht nur ein wissenschaftliches Buch über die späte Lyrik Brechts schrieb, sondern auch ein Brech-Fan bin. Übrigens sah ich hier in England “Die Dreigroschenoper” im Nachbarstädtchen, derart grottenschlecht, dass sich der arme BB im Grabe umgedreht hätte.
      Karl Kraus ist zu Unrecht auch nicht mehr in Deutschland bekannt. Die ganze Szene von Frankfurter Schule über Walter Benjamin bis hin zu Kraus ist in Vergesenheit geraten. Als wir sie in der Studentenrevolution wieder hervorholten, waren sie auch wenigen bekannt. In der Zeit sahen wir Schweden als Vorbild an. Das hat sich wohl nach Palmes Ermordung geändert. Schweden wäre schon für uns ein Land, in dem wir wohnen könnten, aber der weitere Bestand von Europa ist ja nicht mehr so sicher. Wenn in Frankreich LePen gewinnt oder in den Niederlande der Wilders, könnte dies das Ende der EU bedeuten. Dann würde auch Shweden für uns als Domizil problematisch. Anyway, we wait and see …
      Herzlichen Dank für deinen ausführlichen Kommentar.
      Mit lieben Grüßen von Norwegen nach Schweden
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

  3. Was für ein eindrucksvolles Gebäude, Hanne, Klausbernd und ihr lieben Feen. Ich mag besonders, dass der Architekt uns einmal etwas anderes als die mit dem White Cube verwandte Architektur bietet. Mir scheint das Gebäude für Oslo passend!
    Traurig haben mich eure Worte zum Brexit gestimmt, sieht es wirklich so aus, dass ihr England vielleicht verlassen müsst? Das wäre schrecklich und schmerzt mich richtig für euch.
    Ich werde mich gleich aufmachen und mir eine neue Brille aussuchen. Meine Altersweitsicht hat mit +1 begonnen. Gerade im Schummerigen kann ich nicht mehr lesen. Seufz!
    Liebe Grüße aus dem verregneten und stürmischen Berlin sendet euch, Susanne

    Liked by 3 people

    • Guten Tag, liebe Susanne,
      dann wünschen wir dir, dass du eine schicke Brille findest. Masterchen legte sich kürzlich auch eine feine Lesebrille zu.
      Zum Brexit schrieben wir ausführlich in den ersten Kommentaren hier. Es ist schwer zu sagen, wie es uns treffen wird, zumal wir hier keinerlei Anfeindungen, weder privat noch von offiziellen Stellen, erleben, eher Bedauern. Zum Glück sind wir in der privilegierten Lage, dass wir uns das Land, in dem wir weiterhin leben wollen, aussuchen können. Aber aus Cley wegzuziehen würde mir schon sehr schwer fallen.
      Hier fiel an Weiberfastnacht wieder etwas Schnee, immerhin war alles weiß. Am Veilchen-Dienstag geht’s dann morgens zurück nach Hause.
      Liebe Grüße von Norwegen nach Berlin
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

    • Guten Morgen, ihr lieben vier,
      ich habe deine Brexit Kommentare gelesen, Klausbernd. Ich war traurig festzustellen, wie hart euch der Brexit inzwischen dann doch trifft. Als wir unmittelbar nach Peggys Blogbeitrag zum Brexit schrieben, klang es bei euch noch viel optimistischer. Die Welt scheint im Moment aus den Fugen zu gehen und sich bedrohlich zu entwickeln. Das ihr nicht mehr in einem Land mit dieser Politik leben wollt, das verstehe ich. Zumal England nicht eure Geburtsheimat ist. Ich drücke die Daumen, dass ihr gute Lösungen findet.
      Liebe Grüße von Micha und von mir, wir werden heute sicher das gute Wetter zum fotografieren und zeichnen nutzen.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ach ja, liebe Susanne,
      wir waren auch viel optimistischer. In unsere Umgebung in Cley spüren wir nicht den kühlen Wind so stark, alle sind nach wie vor sehr nett zu uns, auch UKIP- Wähler. In meiner Antwort zu Anna Cottage siehst du wie es langsam umschlägt. Uns zieht es mehr und mehr nach Deutschland. Das hätten wir vor einem Jahr nicht träumen können! De facto, jetzt kann keine Behörde bestätigen, es ist OK für mich einen kompletten Umzug nach Norfolk zu unterziehen. It’s risky and uncertain. Ha! Es ist nur ein paar Wochen her, als ich Pit als Antwort schrieb: “Wir bleiben. Wir bleiben cool. Wir gehen erst, wenn das Stück Papier mit der Aufforderung zu gehen ins Haus flattert!”
      Bist du mit deiner neuen Brille zufrieden? Glückwunsch zu all dein Vorhaben, du bist ja megagefragt und erfolgreicher als je zuvor! 🙂
      Wir sind richtig stolz auf dich! 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂
      Dir und Micha ein wunderschönes Wochenende,
      Hanne x

      Like

    • Tja, liebe Susanne, das ist das Eigenartige an unserer Situation, wir bekommen rein gar nichts vom Brexit mit. Alle sind freundlich, nichts hat sich geändert. Aber was wir lesen, das ist besorgniserregend. Im Grunde bekommen wir wenig mehr vom Brexit mit als ihr. Unsere reale Situation ist prima, aber lesen wir die Zeitung, die Kommentare hier, ist’s keinewegs prima. Ist das nun Panikmache? Well, we will see …
      Schönes Fotografieren und Zeichnen.
      Liebe Grüße an dich und Micha
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

    • P.S.
      Mir fällt gerade noch ein, dass Bert Brecht im Exil in Svendborg sich ein Schild aufhängte mit den Worten “die Wahrheit ist konkret”. Also konkret spüren wir hier gar nichts. Sollte das alles nur Medienhysterie sein?
      Schönes Wochenende
      Klausbernd 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Das sind wunderbare Bilder dieses Museums, das ganz offensichtlich ein stimmiges, atemberaubendes Gebäude ist. Aber vor allem eure einführenden Worte zum Exit vom Brexit haben mich bewegt – ich glaubte zwar, Singapur sei die teuerste Stadt der Welt, dann Zürich – jetzt aber auch noch Oslo. Man hat das Gefühl, die Welt wird immer kleiner: Entweder herrschen Krieg und Diktatoren bzw. Möchtegern-Diktatoren, die Angst und Abscheu erwecken oder aber die Städte werden unbewohnbar, weil man nur noch gewissen Einkommensklassen darin wohnen kann – so oder so: Spaltung.
    Deshalb aber sollte man die Schönheiten der Welt, ob die natürlichen oder die von Menschenhand geschaffenen – wie dieses Museum – erst recht genießen und in sich aufnehmen.
    LG Birgit

    Liked by 3 people

    • Danke, liebe Birgit, für deinen Kommentar, der unsere volle Zustimmung findet. Es ja diese Spaltung, die den Populismus nährt. Wir sagen mal kühn, ohne sie hätte es weder Brexit noch Trump gegeben.
      Aber wir lassen uns nicht davon unterkriegen und genießen die Schönheiten der Welt und schauen mal, wo es uns hin verschlägt oder ob wir bleiben.
      Habe ein rundum feines Karnevalswochenende wünschen dir
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

  5. The whole Brexit thing is a nightmare in so many ways, affecting so many people now and into the future. I can only hope against hope that our collective and individual stories can all somehow achieve happy endings.

    Liked by 3 people

  6. Love this structure so related with the environment!
    As for the uncertainty of your future , I feel sorry and very sad….
    It seems that things never end up as they ought to….
    A heartfelt Good luck , Dina….!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you so much for your kind words!
      We will see what will happen and try to make the best. We are lucky having quite a choice where to go – if we don’t stay.
      We wish you a happy weekend
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Never have I seen such beautiful photos of the Astrup Fearnley Museum, you should invite the museum to have a look at your work! 🙂 I have visited Tjuvholmen and the museum on two occasions, it really is a wonderful highlight in Oslo. The Murakami exhibtion is on my list now, thank you!
    You must be fed up with this stupid Brexit. Erna Solberg went out and warned the citizens of the UK before the referendum; “Believe me, you don’t want to be faced with the problems we have to deal with!” The question in the referendum was about remaining in or leaving the EU. So the UK hasn’t formally voted for anything but leaving the EU. Ha!?? However it seems that there were some who were naïve enough to vote “Leave” and not realise what lay behind the façade of Cameron’s “modernising” Conservative Party.
    I sincerely hope it works out well for the four of you.
    Klem, Hjerter ❤

    Liked by 4 people

    • Dear Hjerter,
      the problem is this split society in the UK, some are rich as rich can be, but a majority is very poor, much poorer as we knew this from Germany and Norway. The split feeds a populism with quite some characteristics know from German history. And there are papers like The Sun f.e. which support this far right ideas. And we were disappointed that Labour didn’t go against this populism (we zhink that’s the end of Labour).
      Anyway, thanks a lot for commenting
      Love xxx
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

  8. Beautiful photowork of this magnificent building, Hanne! Renzo Piano’s work is amazing and sheer wonderful.

    I feel deeply concerned and worried by your words. In other words:
    YOU, THE FAB FOUR ARE THE NEW REFUGEES!!!!

    Love and hugs to my dear friends from Stockholm,
    Annalena x

    Liked by 3 people

    • This is a good point, Annalena. I’m Italian, living in England since many years and I might be a future refugee as well. Countless times I heard “we didn’t mean ‘you’ ” – someone should inform these people that if they didn’t mean to half-ruin the life of a mature Italian lady like me but only those of ‘nasty’ Romanians and Poles, well they should be aware that in life it never works that way. A beast has been unleashed. Sigh.

      Liked by 6 people

    • Dear Annalena,
      you are absolutely right, it could well be that we are the new refugees. By the way, we thought of going to Sweden as well, but first we’ll wait what happens with France as this seems to us very important for the EU.
      Thanks a lot for loving Dina’s pictures. Your praise made her day 🙂
      Lots of love to our dear friend in Sweden
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Chiara,
      the problem is that populism never differentiates – that makes populism.
      Now they say that you are meant to leave and later it turns against every foreigner.
      Thanks for commenting.
      Wishing you a great weekend
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

  9. What an eye opener! I was aware that many Brits living living in Europe are concerned about what will happen after Brexit, but never gave a thought of the other way around where Europeans live in the UK! I hope that some positive solutions will come out for all caught in-between Brexit.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thank you! Yes, we hope so as well.
      But on the other hand it is this rising populism in England – not in Scotland – that could make England a country we don’t like to live in any longer. The split in the society is too big in comparison to western EU countries and that the UK will become a kind of coloy of the US worries us.
      Wishing you a happy weekend
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Renzo Piano è una delle menti eccellenti italiane si porta nel DNA secoli di gradi Achitetture e grandissimi esempi di Arte insuperabile, le sue idee hanno un costrutto, un denominatore storico e se ne resta sempre entusiasti e affascinati, questo capolavoro “tetto” di Oslo non fa eccezione, si è perfettamente integrato nell’ambiente e nei colori esaltando l’Arte.
    Questo può essere abbinato alle nuove idee politiche di certi ambienti inglesi che contrastano l’unità europea? certo, perch Renzo Piano è un europeo, l’arte stessa lo è…allora si costruiscono muri e problemi per la goiventù?
    questo non ha nessun senso logico n tantomeno pratico
    vi ringrazio moltissimo per questo interessantissimo post che compendia arte e politica
    felice giorno
    Annalisa

    Liked by 2 people

    • Liebe Annalisa,
      genau, Renzo Piano ist ein klassischer Europäer, der weltoffen und politisch reflektiert in seinen Entwürfen ist. Im Grunde ist Architektur ja immer auch ein politisches Statement. Renzo Pianos ist offen, wohingegen hier in UK zu beobachten ist, das die Architektur sich mehr und mehr durch Tore und Mauern abschließt, was der deutsche Philosoph Ernst Bloch faschistische Architektur nannte. Wir werden in unserem nächsten Blog noch näher auf Kunst und Politik eingehen.
      Danke für deine Betonung der Einbindung der Umgebung in Pianos Achitektur.
      Mit lieben Grüßen aus Norwegen
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

  11. What a contrast, such a beautiful post and worried thoughts. Stupid Brexit!
    Not everyone who voted for Brexit is a racist, but you can be sure, every racist voted Brexit. You Fab Four being confronted with being the new refugees, I cant believe it and I shudder at what the future holds… Closed minds equals closed borders if you ask me. And I haven’t even mentioned the name of the cartoon figure across the pond. You seem to have a kindred spirit in Trudeau of Canada.
    I’m sending you four big hugs to Oslo. Siri and Selma, start producing some fairy dust right away and I’ll keep my fingers crossed,
    Sarah xox

    Liked by 4 people

    • Dear Sarah,
      it seems to us that England is stepping back in history, maybe it dreamed too long of its lost glory. Yes, we agree this tendency of closing in starts in the minds goes on on the borders and, as we wrote above, can be seen in architecture and art. Actually it is always a sign of a down fall.
      Thank you, love from Norway
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Ihr Lieben, nun schreibt ihr es, was ich mich schon im Stillen fragte, ob Norwegen eine Alternative zu England sein könnte, ja teuer ist Norge, seeeehr teuer und so ein wunderschönes Land- nun, ich bin mir sicher, dass ihr Wege finden werdet- Bedrückend ist die Situation ja nicht nur in England, mich bedrückt gerade auch vieles, was in der Welt geschieht und auch in D…
    Nun aber zu der heiteren Seite des Lebens, ein feiner Bau und ein feiner Satz: “Kunst macht aus Menschen bessere Menschen.” und eine tolle Haltung, dass weisse Boxen Kunst töten kann!
    Ich danke euch von Herzen für euren Ausflug und eure Gedanken und dir, liebe Hanne für die Bilder.
    Alles Liebe und Gute wünsche ich euch und uns allen, dass es eine Besinnung in der Welt geben möge.
    Herzliche Grüsse
    Ulli

    Liked by 3 people

    • Danke, liebe Ulli, für deinen lieben Kommentar.
      Wir müssen zugeben, wenn wir über Alternativen zu UK nachdenken, dass neben Schweden und Dänemark auch Deutschland für uns ein attraktives Land ist. Wir glauben nämlich, zumindest von außen, zu sehen, dass es in Deutschland ein große Gruppe wacher und auch beherzter Leute gibt, die sich gegen den um sich greifenden Populismus erhebt. Wir haben das Gefühl z.B. im Vergleich mit England, dass viele Deutsche von der Geschichte lernten. Außerdem ist die Spaltung zwischen arm und reich in Deutschland längst so drastisch wie in England. Also Deutschland ist für uns schon auch eine attraktive Alternative.
      Toll, dass dir Dinas Aufnahmen vom Museum so gut gefallen. Danke! Im nächsten Blog kannst du die Innenräume sehen.
      Wir senden liebe Grüße von Norwegen, wo es an Weiberfastnacht wieder fein schneite, und wünschen ein angenehmes Wochenende
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

    • Lieber Klausbernd, ich hoffe es, dass die Deutschen gelernt haben, wie es ausschaut, haben sie, ein paar Unbelehrbare gibt es immer und ich glaube tatsächlich auch, dass die AfD eine Zeiterscheinung ist, ohne wirklich Macht- allerdings sehe ich das hier so, was in den Gebieten der ehemaligen DDR tobt ist allerdings ein anderer Schnack und auch beängstigend und nicht nur in Sachsen, leider!
      Ich bin gespannt wohin es euch ziehen wird und ob überhaupt Cley next the Sea ein Kapitel ist, das du schliessen wirst- so ein schöner Ort!
      herzliche Grüsse, auch hier ist der Winter seit heute Nacht zurück, aber es wird ein Intermezzo sein.
      Ulli

      Liked by 1 person

    • Liebe Ulli,
      da hast du wohl recht, es ist erschreckend, dass es solch Unbelehrbare speziell im Osten gibt. Wir haben die zum Glück noch nicht erlebt, stopp, ich KB doch einmal in Sachsen: Als ich auf einer Vortragsreise war, wollte ich mein Honorar auf mein Postsparbuch einzahlen, in dem meine Englische Adresse verzeichnet war. Der junge Postbeamte nannte mich, dies sehend, “Vaterlandsverräter”. Ich geb’s zu, mir fiel nichts dazu ein. Schade!
      Aber im Großen und Ganzen finden wir in Deutschland -und wir kennen nur den Westen und Weimar – die politische Stimmung wach.
      Ja, so einen schönen Ort und solch ein tolles Haus mit großem Grundstück zu verlassen, würde uns schon schwerfallen. Das wäre für uns, glaube ich, das Ende der “Landphase”. Danach käme wohl wieder eine “Kulturphase” in eher städtischem Gebiet.
      Liebe Grüße aus Norwegen, mach’s gut
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Congratulations, Fab Four! What a fine post once again with beautiful images. Congratulations Oslo, you have another majestic building! What a pity I missed it on our short visit three years ago.
    My sincere sympathy for your problems with the Brexit. I’m familiar with your ponderings about the future as I have Scottish friends who voted in (to remain in the UK) but want to be part of the EU more than part of the UK, and so would vote out with another referendum. Being an English/British person, today I identify more as being European than I do as being British.
    Hope you can still enjoy expensive Oslo and beautiful Norway. The nature is outstanding in its naturaly beauty.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Dear Paul,
      actually if Scotland in their referendum to come (?) would vote out we could well imagine moving up there. It’s better living in Scotland being connected with the EU than in England as a kind of colony of the US getting even poorer as it already is.
      Yes, we think this museum is a MUST SEE when visiting Oslo – well, next time.
      Happy weekend
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

  14. That is indeed a wonderful building, made beautiful by your striking photographs as usual.
    I am being very positive about Brexit (though of course, I do not face your issues) and feel sure that people like you and KB will not see that much of a difference in your futures. I am predicting a continuing happy life for you in Cley.
    Love from Beetley, Pete and Ollie. X

    Liked by 3 people

    • Good afternoon, dear Pete,
      let’s hope for the best.
      Thanks a lot for liking Dina’s photographs. In our next post she will present the inside.
      With love from Norway where it started snowing yesterday 🙂 but we will be back on Tuesday
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Das ist ein wahrhaft atemberaubendes Gebäude und eure wundervollen Fotos zeigen es von seinen besten Seiten! 😄
    Ich teile eure Sorgen wegen des scheußlichen Brexits. Verwandte von mir sind Engländer und wir gucken alle recht unbehaglich in die Zukunft. Ich frage mich ständig, warum so viele Leute nicht verstehen wollen, dass das Ganze ein Schritt in die falsche Richtung ist? Ich hoffe sehr, dass Ihr eine zufriedenstellende Lösung finden werdet! LG aus Berlin, Sarah 😄 xxx

    Liked by 1 person

    • Liebe Sarah,
      diese offene Architektur kann man genau als das Gegenteil zum sich abschließenden England sehen. Sie hat uns auch auf Anhieb gut gefallen. In der nächsten Post werden wir dich mit dem Innenraum überraschen.
      Der Brexit ist für alle scheußlich, ein Niedergang für England und fürchterlich für Engländer in der EU als auch für Ausländer in England. Blödsinnig kurzsichtiger Populismus.
      Mach’s gut und ganz herzlichen Dank für all die Likes.
      Feiert ihr in Berlin auch Karneval?
      Von uns auch Fast-Kölnern närrische Grüße
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

    • Ich freue mich schon sehr auf die Bilder eures nächsten Posts!!!
      Ihr habt so recht mit dem, was Ihr über den Breit schreibt! Ich wünschte, es würde sich noch ändern lassen, aber das schein leider unmöglich zu sein…
      Es gibt tatsächlich einige Leute, die Karneval hier feiern, aber die meisten sind sicherlich keine waschechten Berliner 😉 Ich selbst begnüge mich damit, haufenweise leckere Pfannkuchen zu essen 😉
      Feiert schön und habt ein herrliches Wochenende! Liebe Grüße aus einem ausnahmsweise sonnigen Berlin! Sarah 🙂 xxx

      Liked by 2 people

    • Tja, ich bin ja vor den Toren Kölns geboren und da hat man wohl Karneval im Blut 🙂
      Genieße die Sonne, ich gehe jetzt auch hinaus – in den Schnee.
      Liebe Grüße
      Klausbernd und die anderen drei

      Liked by 2 people

  16. Fab Four of Cley,
    It is wonderful to see a new post and the magnificent images you produce. The name certainly caught my eye of Takashi and Haruki Murakami, being as there is a Murakami Museum here in South FL. They were part of the Yamato group of farmers that had much of their land appropriated during WWII. But, I am unable to locate any blood connection between these men and the families here.
    Have a terrific stay in Oslo and be well!
    GP Cox

    Liked by 2 people

    • Good afternoon, our dear friend,
      we have to admit we were a bit ignorant only knowing Haruki Murakami. But fortunately that has changed now and actually we will blog about this Takashi Murakami in our next post. Murakami seems to like Smith and Miller in Japan.
      Oh dear, we didn’t know much about the Yamato group in Florida. Well, blogging is educating us 🙂
      Thanks a lot, dear GP Cox, for your commentary.
      We wish you a happy weekend
      The Fab Four of Cley from Norway where it started snowing yesterday 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Of course!
      We had some snow here yesterday, but today it’s nearly all gone again. Fortunately we were immediately out to have a day of skiing in the Norwegian Woods.
      We promise, we’ll think of you when the next snow will come – this can’t be winter’s end.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Exit to the Brexit, not so easy, we have a PIS(S)-government in Poland, a proto-fascist government in Hungary with Orban, now in the Netherlands and France far-right politicians want to take over power also (hopefully not). Yesterday a Danish politician requested a change of the borders with Germany, although a general election in 1920 in the Schleswig region is the clear legal binding basis for the borderline. So today South-Schleswig is German and the rest Danish, no problem at all. Have all these people been historically brain-washed and forgotten the evil of nationalist-fascist politics?

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you very much for your commentary showing the political dangers in nowadays Europe.
      It may sound very elitist but I think one can’t let the people decide such basic questions like Brexit. Wasn’t it every time in history that the people voted their own downfall? This populism doesn’t help anybody except the populist politicians.
      But anyway nobody listen to us – what a pity!
      Wishing you a happy weekend
      Klausbernd

      Liked by 2 people

  18. I have tried to read as much of this as possible, and all I can gather from the comments regarding Brexit is that my Country the UK or perhaps I should say England has become a Country where racists are rampant where there is nothing but all those ignorant people who have no jobs they are the ones who voted Brexit. Really? I voted Brexit and I am thoroughly sick of being accused of being a Racist. I come from immigrants, my own Parents came to England from Ireland for work prior to World War II. I was born here, educated here, worked in London for one of the biggest Companies. Married and raised two Sons, Widowed at 45 left to raise two young Boys and I never asked for handouts we survived. I understood exactly what I was voting for in voting Brexit, just as I understood 45/46 years ago when I voted I did not want to enter the European Union, but we entered and all we seemed to do in this Country was pay more and more money to the EU. I understood fully what voting for Brexit meant, it was my democratic right to vote and no one whether from this Country or elsewhere had or has the right to tell me my vote was not legitimate and they want it changed. The Remainders lost, get over it, every Country has Racists I don’t know one country that anyone here has written from that has not had racists. Sweden/Germany/Holland/Belgium how many more Countries shall I mention that has extremists within. How we deal with it is another matter. England, the Country I speak for is NOT a Racist Country its what people who cannot accept a democratic decision are using as an excuse for not winning. As for America, there are Americans who would not agree but this Country of mine has always had this Special Friendship with the United States, that is until Obama. As for President Trump the Country Voted and Donald Trump was elected, I have never known such disrespect for a President. There are Americans that don’t like him, well vote him out in four years, maybe one of the main reasons why Donald Trump suddenly beat that woman Hillary Clinton was because she called her own people “DEPLORABLES” and there were those that wanted to vote for her, never mind the fact she is not exactly honest. I look forward to the State Visit of President Trump and our Mr Speaker should be kicked out of office for his disgraceful remarks. Abuse works both ways.

    No one in this Country, the UK will be kicked out or has been kicked out unless they are illegal and have criminal record etc. Any person who came here from abroad legally and has lived and worked here and is not wanted by the Police, are quite safe. STOP THE SCAREMONGERING ABOUT THE UNITED KINGDOM.

    Like

    • Thanks a lot for presenting a different view to most of the commentators here and so nicely agitated 🙂
      We actually didn’t read that somebody was writing that England is a racist country. We think that England is a country where populism is quite strong, much stronger than in Germany for example. The split between rich and poor is much bigger than in Scandinavia, Germany, The Netherlands etc. and England is quite poor. Will a dependency on the US help?
      The statistic shows quite clearly that the the majority of educated people voted for staying in. We would say they knew what they were voting for and weren’t that easily manipulated.
      But anyway our question is not so much if we can stay here, it’s rather do we want to live in such a country. You write about the vote of the people reminding us especially of Germany and Italy where people voted for “den totalen Krieg” and “vita periculosa”. If you look at history it’s obvious that “the people” allways voted for their own downfall.
      Anyway thanks for such a nice emotional commentary we like on our blog.
      Klausbernd and the rest of the gang 🙂

      Liked by 4 people

  19. After I have read and answered quite a lot of your commentaries right now – thanks a lot! – I suppose the basic question of Brexit and the rising populism is: do we want to be ruled by the people? It caused a desaster in the German and Italian history. And when in Germany the populists are marching calling “we are the people” then I can only say I am not “the people”. I suppose we are in a situation right now we have to re-think our concept of democracy in times of manipulation by social media and partly by the press as well.
    I notice as older I get as more elitist I am getting. I don’t want to live under the dictatorship of the people. But on the other hand I don’t know an alternative to democracy I would prefer.
    Anyway, let’s hope for the best
    Klausbernd 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  20. Ja, wohin nur, Ihr Lieben?! Diese Frage stellt sich ja auch hier. Aber wo auf dieser Welt koennte es schon hin gehen? Auf eine einsame Suedseeinsel? Fuer mich moeglicherweise. Aber Mary ist weniger fuer eine solche Waerme. Wenn es nach ihr ginge, kaemen wohl eher Nord- oder Suedpol in Frage. 😉 Aber ich da?! Brrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr! 😉 So ist eben – und ich denke mal, fuer Euch wird es ebenso sein – zunaechst einmal bleiben angesagt.
    Macht’s gut in “merry old England” [solange es das noch gibt] und liebe Gruesse aus “Trumpistan” [das es hoffentlich nicht lange gibt],
    Pit

    Liked by 3 people

    • Lieber Pit,
      ja, wir sind da eher wie Mary – some like it cold 😉
      Wohin? Naja, zum Glück haben wir ja als EU Bürger eine große Auswahl. Aber so ich es sehe, wenn’s in England ungemütlich wird, wird’s nach Deutschland als stabiles Land gehen – oder in ein skandinavisches Land.
      Aber erst schauen wir mal, dann sehen wir 😉
      Schönes Wochenende und liebe Grüße an euch beide
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

    • Guten Morgen, lieber Pit,
      ach, weißt du hier es nicht sooo viel anders, nur eben europäischer, eben diskreter und auf der Oberfläche etwas feiner.
      Wenn wir in unserem Freundes- und Bekanntenkreis hier schauen, glauben die meisten, dass Trump sich nicht lange halten kann. Man kann sich das Phänomen Trump hier nicht vorstellen.
      Wir halten fest die Daumen, dass sich die politische Lage bessert. Für Europa hat Trump eine Einigungswirkung. So einen will man hier auf keinen Fall. Über 2 Mio. Engländer reichten eine Petition ein, dass Trump für seinen geplanten Staatsbesuch in Lomdon wieder ausgeladen werden soll.
      Mit ganz lieben Grüßen vom kleinen Dorf am großen Meer
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

    • Lieber Klausbernd,
      Trump ist wahrlich ein Phänomen, das muss man schon sagen. Dass er sich nicht lange halten kann, daran glaube ich weniger. Mit seinen irrationalen Tweets hält er seine Anhänger ja bei der Stange [als ob das nötig wäre: die folgen ihm ja wie einst die Hamelner Kinder dem Rattenfänger], und mit einer – leider – gut geplanten und gehaltenen Rede vor dem Kongress beeindruckt er auch auch die Republikaner. Ich bin übrigens fast mehr in Sorge über diese und deren Bestrebungen im ganzen Land, in den Bundesstaaten, in denen sie die gesamte Legislative und Exekutive beherrschen, die demokratischen Grundrechte einzuschränken. Die neueste Attacke darauf ist jezt eine geplante Einschränkung des Demonstrationsrechts.
      Dazu kommt, dass die Demokraten bis jetzt noch keine Strategie erkennen lassen, wie sie ihre Position wieder verbessern können.
      Ach, es gäbe noch viel zu sagen, aber ich lasse das mal. Ich will ja schon nicht am frühen Morgen deprimiert sein.
      Also dann: liebe Grüße ins kleine Dorf am grossen Meer, und macht’s gut, Ihr Fab Four,
      Pit
      P.S.: Ach, doch noch etwas. Wenn die Verhältnisse hier wirklich zu einer besseren Einigung und einem gestärkten Europa führen würden – das wäre schön. Und mal sehen, was beim Brexit kommt, Die Signale [wenn ich mir die letzten Entscheidungen der Lords betrachte] sind ja doch sehr gemischt.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Hi, lieber Pit,
      nachdem ich nun alle unsere Messer geschärft habe und die Sonne herauskommt, zu Trump. Naja, wie ich schon schrieb, das Volk wählte fast immer seinen eigenen Untergang. Psychologisch gesehen, würde ich das als Todestrieb bezeichnen. Ob sich wirtschaftlich Trumps Kurs der Isolierung bewähren wird, wage ich zu bezweifeln. Ich denke mir, Trump wird die USA klein machen. Wie dann mit den zu erwartenden Unruhen umgegangen wird, ist eine andere Frage. Wenn ich deinen Kommentar richtig lese, dann sind leider wohl die Trump Gegner weniger organisiert.
      Aber nun wird nicht mehr Trübsal geblasen, sondern hinaus an die frische Frühlingsluft gegangen.
      Ganz liebe Grüße,
      Klausbernd
      auch der Rest der Gang lässt lieb grüßen
      P.S.:
      Ich wundere mich immer, wie gut du informiert bist, was hier in old Europe politisch so läuft. Vorbildlich!

      Like

    • Lieber Klausbernd,
      hier ist es Nichts mit rausgehen. Na ja, moeglichg waere es schon, aber es ist bedeckt. Nix Sonne! Die kommt wohl erst morgen wieder raus. Aber Du hast Recht: es wird keine Truebsal geblasen!
      Was meine Kenntnis der Entwicklung in Eurpoa angeht: da halte ich mich auf dem Laufenden. Ich bekomme mehrmals taeglich Emails mit Auszuegen aus der “Welt” und “Zeit”, und auch das Portal von GMX ist gar nicht schlecht. Da logge ich mich auch mehrmals taeglich ein. Immer, bevor ich Emails abrufe. Das, und das Verfolgen der Nachrichten von hier kosten aber eine Menge Zeit. Insbesondere jetzt, zur Zeit der Trump-Praesidentschaft. Trotzdem: man muss ja wissen, was vorgeht.
      Also dann, habt’s fein draussen im Sonnenschein,
      Pit

      Like

    • Lieber Onkel Pit
      wir werden mal ein bisschen magic für dich machen, aber ob’s hilft? Sagt ihr nicht immer “gegen Dummheit kämpfen Götter selbst vergenens” und wir hoffen, dass das nicht auch für Feen gilt.
      Mit ganz viel Feenhauch von
      Siri 🙂 und 🙂 Selma

      Liked by 1 person

  21. I am not the people, I am Pia
    Who ever this Pia might be…..
    Leider überfordert mich die Diskussion, erst mal in Ruhe nachdenken…nach dem Tanzen….oder auch während…..
    Das sind körperliche Schmerzen: Die Vorstellung, dass ihr euer schönes Haus verlassen müsstet!
    Mit weißen und schwarzen Würfeln kenne ich mich nicht sehr gut aus…

    Die Narren sind ja gerade wieder überall, Masken tragen, Verkleiden…nicht so spaßig für mich…
    Mehr Mensch als deutsch! Gibt’s das schon als Buchtitel? Meine Erfahrung ist, dass ich gar nicht alles richtig mache, vor allem, wenn ich mich nicht auskenne. Ich befürchte, dass ich gar nicht wirklich Demokratie-tauglich bin, denn es gibt so viele Bereiche, in denen mir Fachwissen fehlt.(Und das trotz Abi und allgemeiner Weiterbildung, oder gerade deswegen?)
    Es gibt nicht den bösen Russen, Türken, Italiener, Engländer, Amerikaner, Deutschen, Chinesen…usw….Reihenfolge willkürlich….

    Tschüß, gehe Hopsen, da kenne ich mich wenigstens ein wenig aus….da wechselt man andauernd die Perspektive und das gefällt mir….
    Herzliche Grüße von Pia Odenwald

    Liked by 3 people

    • Liebe Pia,
      als Fast-Kölner sahen wir natürlich gestern wieder die Mädchensitzung in Köln. Wir haben uns teilweise schief gelacht. Völlig erstaunt waren wir, wie artistisch heute in Tanzchors getanzt wird.
      Ja, wer kennt sich schon richtig mit der Politik aus in einem Zeitalter, in dem speziell im Netz es vor Falschnachrichten nur so wimmelt. Kürzlich hörten wir: “Weil’s so im Netz steht, kann es nicht stimmen.”
      Also Kopf hoch, närrische Grüße aus Norwegen
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

  22. It must be terribly upsetting to face such uncertainty. I know how I would feel if I had to leave my home, even if I had other options. Those would obviously be second or third choices. Try not to worry. Just wait and see how things develop and then, having studied and prepared for all the possibilities, make the best choice available to you. I know you will do that anyway – just saying that is what I would do. As for the museum, the design of the building is unique, and a work of art in itself, but I wondered about it being right on the water. It must be a constant battle against dampness from the sea. I know museums are particular about not wanting their artifacts to become damp. Have they addressed this eventuality? Wonderful photos, as always!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thank you very much, dear Anneli, to see our situation exactly as it is now. Emotionally we want to stay in our cosy home but our heads are not so sure. And as you say, we wait and see. Fortunately as EU citizens and Dina as Norwegian we have all this choices. Otherwise it would be quite grim.
      We don’t know about the damp proof but we would think that Renzo Piano found an solution.
      All the best and a happy weekend
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 3 people

    • When I say “on” the water, I mean “by” the water. So it’s an artificial lake! I thought it was the seaside. But still, it would be damp. I guess, as you say, they must have found a solution to this potential problem. Have a great weekend.

      Liked by 2 people

    • It might appear to be a man made artificial lake surrounding the museum, but Tjuvholmen is a peninsula sticking out from Aker Brygge into the Oslofjord. When you walk about, you get a different feeling because this prime location is packed with buildings and the most home expensive flats in Norway. And a 5***** hotel, of course named “The Thief”. 🙂

      Tjuvholmen is part of the Fjord City urban renewal program. This program has seen the opening of several art galleries, beside the Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art also the Gallery Haaken. Tjuvholmen skulpturpark, next to the museum, was also created by Renzo Piano.

      The geology of the former islet is of great interest. The German geologist Leopold von Buch visited the area in 1806-07, and he then discovered and described rhomb porphyry for the first time.

      The first element is tjuv ‘thief’, the last element is the finite form of holme m ‘islet’. (The islet was later turned into a peninsula because of post-glacial rebound.) Thieves were executed here in the 18th century. An older (Danish) spelling of the name was “Tyveholmen.

      Have a happy Saturday,
      Dina 🙂

      Liked by 4 people

    • Dear Anneli,
      we have to admit we didn’t think about it. And we don’t know how this problem is solved there. Sorry, we were that ignorant.
      But now we see – but don’t know.
      Thanks for making us aware
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

  23. I have thought for some time that the EU was headed for failure as it has been financiallly unbalanced for quite some time. I also think Brevet is an indicator of a larger problem and potential disbandment. Also, based on my experiences in England, it is hardly surprising that less-educated would vote for what appears to be a simple solution. We face the same problem in the US, a lack of education and a government that has discouraged citizen particpation, leading to disinterest and emotional decision making by many who vote. If I were in your situation, I would seriously consider leaving England, which I believe you are from your comments. I don’t like the situation but it is what it is. I wish the best for all of you.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Robert,
      we agree! And we suppose it’s not only a problem of the EU it’s a problem of democracy in times when false news manipulate. The basic problem is probably the big gap in education – in England much bigger than in other countries we know. Democracy only works with educated people. History taught us this.
      Anyway, thanks for your comment and good wishes. We wish you that all the best as well in the US – where we actually lived for quite a while, in Vermont.
      Happy weekend
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 3 people

  24. I am sorry but I do find your response to what I said rather strange. For a start where do you obtain the fact that England is a poor Country and will the US help. What do you think we need the United States to survive, please that is so ridiculous. The United Kingdom is Rich, believe me. So to you and others it appears that only the educated voted to Remain in Europe, what a disgusting thing to say, so all the others who voted to leave are uneducated – how can you make such a statement. This Country has poured money into Europe, watched it being wasted. The Celtic Tiger, where do you think most of their money came from when they got into trouble. I visited Ireland every year and watched them from the poor Country to suddenly seeing money flow in, then there was so much money too many people started to waste it, would buy two houses 2/3 cars, shopping not even looking at prices, holidays here there and everywhere. I only had to discuss the situation with my Cousins to know what went on, then the money dried up and they were in trouble and money from us helped them. This is not Germany, Sweden, France or Belgium or the others where you see REAL Racists, where you have real problems to contend with. The UK is far from that, but if you are of that opinion then by all means keep your distance from us.

    I have watched the troublemakers in my Country who refuse to accept a Democratic Vote and Result, think they could overthrow that result and when they see they can’t they call RACISTS all the time. I have seen that very same attitude in America, the people voted, those that lost don’t like the result so believe they can over turn it. What is wrong with you people, your Countries have problems and you blame others for it. The trouble is something most of you will not be honest enough to admit and that is that far too many immigrants/migrants have entered Europe and we cannot cope. Terrorism is within each Country – if you think by my saying all this, makes me a Racist, you think it.

    Like

    • It’s a classical structure of political manipulation to argue against something that’s never said. Nobody speaks of racism here. I suppose you should review your facts. How the different social groups have voted concerning Brexit is an English statistics and it’s obvious seeing f.e. how Oxford and Cambridge have voted. Another classical structure of populism is to take objective arguments personally.
      Concerning Germany: the income of the budget last year was the highest since the sixties (you can look this up in the official website of the gov.). Look at The Netherlands and other EU countries. You can look it up as well how much UK paid to the EU and how much it got back. We have to get our facts straight, I suppose.
      If you need your kind of view then do so. Most of the people blogging here see it differently. Well, that’s life …
      Anyway I never said you are a racist, this I don’t know, but your structure of argumentation is manipulative and at least quite near populistist ways of argumentation – consciously or unconconsciously.
      Thanks for answering
      Klausbernd

      Liked by 2 people

    • I respect, but I don’t share your opinion, Anna, but seriously, I’m not asking for trouble, not calling anyone a racist. I have spent the last 5 years in Norfolk,the county of your favourite, Farage.(And honestly, until the Referendum I was convinced I’d grow old in this beautiful part of the world.) We declared our home a “Farage Free Zone”. Of course we know UKIP people. And of course “we didn’t mean you!” is something we have heard many times lately. Sadly, it doesn’t help us now. “We don’t want the refugees, we don’t want the less privileged people in the EU”, that’s what we heard. “We don’t want to pour money into the EU and pay for the poor.”
      The Referendum was about the EU. Brexit is short for “British exit of the EU”. And it’s hitting us hard. Much harder than we expected. I have always felt extremely privileged, calling Norway 🇳🇴 my home country, proud to live in Germany 🇩🇪 as well in England 🇬🇧. Feelings are changing for the latter. You go on making Britain great again, probably = we have to go.

      “You can have the other words
      chance, luck, coincidence, serendipity.
      I’ll take grace.
      I don’t know what it is exactly,
      but I’ll take it. ”
      ― Mary Oliver

      Regards from Norway, Dina

      Liked by 2 people

  25. This is a stunning building. I look forward to seeing the interior.
    Things in the U.S. are unsettling to say the least. However, I don’t believe isolation is the solution. Hiding doesn’t solve anything.
    I hope things work out for you.

    Liked by 3 people

    • As we wrote before, we love the openness of Renzo Piano’s buildings. We only know his buildings in Europe but they are all full of light and harmoniously set into their surroundings.
      Thanks and have a happy weekend
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

  26. Liebe Siri, liebe Selma, wie gut eure Worte und Dinas Bilder dieses “Dazwischen”, dieses leicht Surreale (des Gebäudes in Oslo ebenso wie des europäischen Hauses) einfangen! Ich hoffe und wünsche sehr, dass sich für euch persönlich gute gangbare Wege auftun!

    Liked by 4 people

    • Huch und entschuldigung liebe Maren,
      jetzt kommen wir erst dazu, dir zu antworten. Aber es war so viel los hier. Wir mussten unsere Feenrucksäckchen packen, naja, das ging noch, aber Haare waschen fanden wir schon blöder. Wir reisen ab von dem schönen Norwegen.
      Tja, im “Dazwischen” liegt die Message meistens -oder?!
      Ganz viel lieben Feenhauch für dich von
      Siri 🙂 und 🙂 Selma, Freundinnen des Surrealen

      Like

    • Danke für den Feenhauch, ihr Lieben, den kann ich gut gebrauchen! Und was das Haarewaschen angeht, das bei Feen sicher noch aufwändiger ist als bei Menschen: mein Verständnis habt ihr. Mein Schönstes ist das auch nicht. Nur neulich, als ich in der Wüste war und mir tagelang nicht die Haare waschen konnte, da habe ich mich richtig darauf gefreut. 😉 Guten Flug und liebe Grüße!

      Like

  27. Weisse Kuben macht der Architekt Renzo Piano meistens nicht- siehe auch Centre Georges-Pompidou in Paris. Dem Zeitgeist verpflichtend finde ich diese Mischung aus Konstruktion und Holz-Architektur kräftig und passend. Eure Fotos sind erstklassig.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Da hast du Dina eine große Freude bereitet 🙂 Sie ist es, die bei uns die Fotos schießt. Irgendwie ist sie gerade weg – wahrscheinlich wieder photographieren.
      Wir sind so Art Fans von Pianos Architektur, besonders von seinen lichterfüllten Räumen. Davon zeigen wir etwas in unserer nächsten Post.
      Liebe Grüße aus Norwegen und vielen Dank für’s Kommentieren
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  28. I have been following the Brexit situation closely from afar. We live in a complex and uncertain times. Can hardly wait to discuss this face-to-face. Take care, my dear friends, the Fab Four of Cley. Hugs and lots of love coming across the pond.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Dear Clanmother,
      indeed, we are living in uncertain times – but actually people always thought this throughout the history. We envy you living in Canada with its relatively liberal politics. And, of course, we are very much looking forward meeting our dear friend face to face.
      We will go home on Tuesday morning. We had a great time in Norway but now we are looking forward being at home again.
      With a big HUG and lots of love to Vancouver
      The Fab Four of Cley xxxxx

      Liked by 2 people

    • Safe travels! You are so right – I don’t think that humanity has ever known certainty. I am going through my father’s photos that date back to the 1930’s. As I look over the years, one thing has become certain – time is short, moments are fleeting, choose wisely. As Virgil wrote centuries ago: “Death twitches my ear; “Live,” he says…I’m coming.”

      Liked by 2 people

    • Good morning, dear Clanmother,
      oh, we like this Virgil quote!
      Siri said: “What’s never changing is that life is changing all the time”.
      We wish you a happy day and now we are off to the airport.
      With a big hug from Norway
      The Fab Four of Cley
      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

  29. Excellent shots of an architechtural wonder. very beautiful – looking forward to seeing more of this. I am sorry about the uncertainties right now, but I am sure you will make the best solution of it. Wishing all four of you a lovely weekend.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Good morning, dear Leya,
      thank you for liking Dina’s photographs 🙂
      Well, we are quite positve now finding the best solution, but we have had our hang-ups too.
      For you a GREAT weekend as well
      Love xxx
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  30. Great pictures from Oslo! I know this city so well – but you show it in such a new way, very modern and creative. Never been to the museum though, not the lover of modern art, me. Your story makes me wanna go there now!))

    Liked by 2 people

    • Well, that’s wonderful. Go ahead! 🙂

      I think Renzo Piano has got the right approach:
      “A museum is a place where one should lose one’s head”

      🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

    • If you don’t like modern art then you wouldn’t like the Murakami exhibition. We will write about his art in the our next post and you can see art work of his. But you can enjoy this building which is art as well.
      Thanks and have a happy weekend
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

    • I understand what you mean. But what do we see as beauty? And how does it change?
      For me art has to get me thinking by changing my mode of perceiving.
      Thanks and all the best
      Klausbernd 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • I agree that our notion of beauty changes. But still for me beauty is not just a social construct (though it is that too), it is a divine game of proportions, found in flowers, galaxies and sea shells, that is universally recognized, I believe, even by babies :)))
      And yes, art is changing my mode of perception too 😉

      Liked by 1 person

    • Well, lots of philosophers thought about beauty. How we judge what we perceive is partly archetypal but most of it is a social contract mixed with our individual psyche. What we see as archetypal has a lot to with mathmathics, with proportion as you write. Hegel made the clever difference between the beauty of art and the beauty of nature as a basic difference in aethetics. And since his time it was seen as two different cups of tea. The beauty of nature is the realm of mathmatics/proportions. Modern art, of course, has to do with the beauty of art.
      Anyway, just some reflections about beauty …
      Have a happy evening
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

    • Wow, I am impressed with your knowledge of philosophers, it is a great supplement in the discussion of beauty. Well, since Hegel made this distinction, I am perfectly happy because I trust him! hehe no, but his point is a good explanation. May I only add that the beauty of nature is more than just mathematics, for me it is kind of metaphysical matter, call it divinity, energy, our psyche, or whatever. I believe in its ability of lifting our spirit. While art can do that too, or sometimes it just stimulates our mind. It is difficult to put it together in some sentences here, but hope, you get the point. Thanks for the dialogue anyway!

      Liked by 2 people

    • Hi,
      did you know that the early Romantic thinkers and poets had the idea that “god is mathematics”? That’s a quote by Novalis (Friedrich von Hardenberg) who coined the expression of the blue flower of romanticism, an expression going back to his “Heinrich von Ofterdingen”, the protagonist who said “God is Mathematics”.
      Since the classic Greek times “know thyself” was understood as get to know yourself with the help of mathematics. Mathematics has a long tradition of being seen as a way to esoteric wisdom as it reflects divine harmony.
      Thanks you very much for your kind words. I am enjoying our little dialogue very much as well 🙂
      Wishing you a happy weekend
      Klausbernd
      and the rest of the gang

      Liked by 2 people

    • I maybe have read about it in my philosophy class, but surely forgot until now. Thanks for bringing up that point. Which makes me wonder if you are teaching philosophy? I like the idea that God is everything and everything is God. And God as mathematics is a very elegant idea. Math itself is surely beautiful, too sad we don’t learn it at school. In my culture we are used to divide between the physicians and humanitarians, and I would always consider as one in love with words, not numbers. But maybe there is no contradiction there. This kind of discussion is not often for me, and I enjoy it a lot too.
      Have a great weekend!

      Liked by 1 person

    • I studied German and Nordic languages and philosophy and psychology and specialised on the grammar of symbolism. But I was on a grammar school specialised on math. I taught philosophy at the McGill University/Montreal.
      The grammar or language of symbolism is a kind of intersection between mathematics and the humanitarians/arts.
      I need such exchanges of ideas, they are as important for me as food and drink. Actually that’s the reason for my blogging.
      You seem to be very interested in such a philosophical discours as well. Are you a teacher?
      Now I will disappear with Dina, Siri und Selma in our sauna in the garden.
      A GREAT weekend for you as well 🙂
      Klausbernd
      You can see what I did and published on my website http://www.kbvollmar.de or look at Wikipedia
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klausbernd_Vollmar

      Like

    • I am impressed! I have never heard of intersection between math and arts, which sounds great. It is time to step over that seeming divide 🙂 Philosophy has always been my interest, while now I tend more in the direction of spirituality, esoteric philosophy, than the classic one.
      I guess, this is exactly why I blog also: to exchange ideas and inspiration. I hope to build my community here on wordpress for that. though blogging became a fancy thing to do, and a lot fuss around it – hope, I can stick to my first reason and not get carried away by numbers and promotions)))
      Yes, you guessed right! I studied languages, Russian and English, and literature, on a pedagogical university in Ukraine. Here in Norway I have worked as a teacher of everything in a primary school))
      Very nice meeting you, Klausbernd!
      Oh, sauna in the garden sounds so well! Enjoy!

      Liked by 1 person

  31. What a magnificent building.
    Beautiful photos (as always), Dina, but what a dilemma to be in.
    I can only hope for a positive outcome for you and a stable political environment for you to reside in. I’m not au fait with the Brexit situation in detail, but can only hope for the best for the Fab Four of Cley.

    Best Wishes for the Future
    Vicki
    xx

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you so much, dear Vicki❣️ How are you feeling at the moment, any improvements?
      Take good care. We hope you can get out and do some photography this weekend, it’s uplifting, isn’t it?
      Take care. xxxx

      Liked by 3 people

    • I’m much better with the cooler days, thank you for asking, but we seem to have another week of hot weather coming up from tomorrow. I’ve been much better physically with so much rest indoors over the hot summer and usually sleep for a couple of hours every afternoon lately, but not so much mentally as I miss my outdoor photography. I’m a person who needs fresh air and greenery. I’ve been looking at the maps online to try and find more parks and gardens within my immediate area which I hope to explore more in Autumn when its permanently cooler.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Anne. We haven’t visited the Shard yet, but we are planning an art-architecture-library visit to London in the near future and now the Shard 👍🏻 is on our list, originally it wasn’t. 😉
      Warm greetings from Norway! 🇳🇴

      Liked by 3 people

    • Good morning, dear Anne,
      you are very welcome.
      We are just reading about all the buildings one has to see nowadays and the Shard is listed there as well.
      We wish you a relaxed weekend
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 3 people

  32. From the wonderful curve of the roof to the rest of the post, this was such a stimulating post with wonderful photographs. I found the comments disturbing… and am sad to think of your uncertainty about your future.. your home in Cley- on- Sea sounds so idyllic. I hope you feel that you can stay, surrounded by your like-minded neighbours… the larger questions are part of the huge upheavals that the whole world seems to be going through… and the most important thing to me is that we desist from putting labels on things… which can so often distort the arguments !!!!

    Liked by 3 people

  33. I had no idea Oslo was the most expensive city to live in. I’m sorry to hear that a transition may be looming in your future as a result of Brexit.

    While the curved roof adds an explosive and expansive element to the architecture, what appeals to me most from those gorgeous photos is the weathered wood lining the outer walls. Looks so inviting. Makes me want to visit and explore the interior.

    Thank you so much for sharing, and looking forward to the continuation in the next post!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Hi, dear Gabe,
      this building is very special indeed. Besides its form we like its openness which makes it look light, inviting and friendly. Piano used wood as it is the traditional building material of Norway. This building is set into its surrounding very harmoniously.
      Thanks for commeting and wishing you an easy weekend
      The Fab Four of Cley 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

  34. The snow is gone, the sun is out and it’s a wonderful warm day in the south east of Norway although the temperature is -8°C. All the heartfelt sympathetic comments to our worries about our future and your lovely words about my photos make my cheerful and optimistic. Like this visit to Oslo, a wealthy, prosperous capitol. 🙂 I invite you to have a look at Renzo Piano’s outstanding work in Athens. A capitol at the opposite end of the scale. Isn’t this just marvellous:

    https://athensletters.com/2017/02/09/a-walk-in-the-park/

    Thank you Marina, we look forward to a follow up. 🙂

    Congratulations Renzo Piano, congratulations Athens and well done, EU!! 🇬🇷🇪🇺
    ART combines, ART makes us better people, Art conquers limited minds and boundaries. And libraries of course. Now I’m even more determined to carefully pick my surroundings for my beloved ones and myself in the future. You thoughts are all very helpful, the disturbing ones just as much as the positive and comforting ones. Thank you! 💕💕💕💕

    Dina 🇳🇴

    Liked by 4 people

  35. What great photos of a structure that seems at once magnificent yet not intimidating- I look forward to seeing the inside. These do seem the most insecure times we’ve had in the world for decades with xenophobia and intolerance in the rise in so many places. I’m sorry you’ve been caught up in part of it but good for you for speaking out here and let’s us all hope these dark forces can be defeated.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you very much 🙂 We hope so as well that those times of populism and tendencies of isolation are soon gone and open up for something positive.
      We wish you a great weekend
      All the best
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  36. I shall ignore the politics and just comment on the art here. Dina’s art of course. Her photos just get better and better. The colours, the shades, the tones and the framing of this building are wonderful. And the way they have been framed one could simply hang them on a wall. A big, white wall. Of course.
    Love to all of you and enjoy the rest of your stay in the beautiful Norway.
    Jude xx

    Liked by 3 people

    • Liebe Ursula, lieber Herbert,
      toll, dass euch Dinas Fotos gefallen. Sie freut sich sehr darüber 🙂
      Ja, eine leichte, gute Entscheidung brauchen wir wohl. Danke für die guten Wünsche.
      Mit lieben Grüßen von Norwegen nach Frankfurt
      Haltet euch wacker!
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

  37. Dear friends,
    sorry for not having commented earlier on your fabulous post. I’m sure you know what has been going on in and around Longyearbyen lately. We do have severe problems with this very mild winter.
    I find you work outstanding and the photos some of the best I have seen of the AFM so far, well done. This is a place where culture and community come together in a very natural and informal way, typical Scandinavian art, just like R. Piano wanted it to be.
    Talk to you before you head home,
    Per Magnus.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Our dear friend,
      we were very sorry to read about all the problems you have with this mild winter. We hope you will get a real Svalbard-winter soon.
      You made the point, Piano, althouh Italian, converted the Scandinavian way of life into architecture very well.
      We will go home Tuesday morning. We’ll phone before we leave.
      Lots of love xxx
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

  38. Beautiful photo’s of a spectacular building. It is so sad to hear that Brexit has made you feel the need to look for somewhere else, we are going to lose a lot of good people because of it I feel. Still perhaps moving elsewhere is a good thing as our country is going down the pan rapidly, too many idiots in it :/

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thanks for your GREAT commentary. A lot of creative and professional people – Europeans as English – are already prepare to move to other countries. Well, we will look, nothing is decided yet and we are maybe naive hoping for the best. But all these people following Clowns like Michael Farage …
      Wishing you a GREAT weekend
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you for kind comment 💕
      and thank you for being so outspoken. 👍🏻😊
      💃🏼 Dina 🇳🇴 🇩🇪
      🚶Klausbernd 🇩🇪 🇪🇺
      👩‍❤️‍👩 Siri & Selma 🇪🇺 💕🇪🇺

      Liked by 2 people

  39. It’s such a magnificent architecture! So clear to blend the nature with the building. Hope to see inside soon.
    Fabulous photos, Thank you so much for this remarkable post, the Fab Four of Cley! 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  40. Thank you for another great post. Those of us who are British but choose to live elsewhere, watch what’s happening to our beloved country with dismay. How have things reached the point where neighbours are no longer friends but almost enemies as they try to foist their beliefs and ways onto each other. Britain and most certainly London, is far distant place from where I grew up. And Brexit doesn’t make sense to those of us who make our home elsewhere. Brexit and the outcome when/if it happens together with the new President of the US and his views and plans, make living in the here and now a time of concern for our young growing up in this changed world. And for those of you who live in Britain but are not citizens you have a worrying few months in front of you. I feel for you and trusts it turns out well even though at the moment it doesn’t look as if it will. And I should like to subscribe but am unable to find out how. Please help.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Dear Judith,
      thank you very much for your kind commentary! 🙂
      Well, I – Klausbernd – live in England for nearly 35 years and it’s frightening how the political atmosphere has change – especially since the Brexit discussion started with all this fake news. It did split the country like Trump in the US. And we suppose that will not change until the huge gap between the educated and affluent and the underpriviledged will be unmade.
      Anyway we hope for the best, but we have to say that everybody is very friendly to us although from our funny accent everyone immediately notices that we are foreigners.
      Have a happy Sunday
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

    • Primarily because of my situation. I have a Norwegian passport and live in Germany. Momentarily I don’t live 100% in Cley, but our pre-Referendum plan was a permanent move for me next year. We wanted to grow old in our beloved merry England. Because I have not worked 5 years in UK to secure my future, our situation has changed due to the British exit of the EU. The wind has changed. It’s getting chilly for immigration. Change is the one constant in life. We, the Fab four, like to think we move with changes, but this one might very well make us force to move house. Thank you for asking, JF. Have a wonderful Sunday!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Dear JF
      funny, I always think of my main publisher reading JF, these are his initials he underwrites with.
      Well, Dina explained the situation. But the question is as well do we want to stay in a country which isolates itself and in which the populist tendencies take over. We have the choice of many other countries where the political atmosphere is liberal – well, these the rich countries like Germany, Norway and so on.
      Anyway, thanks a lot for commenting.
      All the best
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  41. You traveled to Oslo with a heavy heart. The visit to the Museum brought you a little bit of comfort. You live in England. What does it mean for you personally, my dear friends, when the UK leaves the EU? My heart and thought are with you. Greetings from Canada!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Good morning, dear Peter,
      England is leaving the EU and doesn’t want EU citizens any longer stay in Britain. On the other hand as we lived – at least partly – for 35 years in England we could be safe. That’s a matter of negotiations between the UK and the EU.
      We have a beautiful house with a big garden in a very beautiful area next the sea we don’t like to sell. But nevertheless if the poitical situation in Britain is changing more and more to isolate the country and if the populism takes over more and more we would surely leave. Fortunately we are in a situation having many attractive choices where to go. By the way quite a lot of educated people – British as well as European – are already leaving the UK.
      All the best and thanks.
      Love to our dear friend in Canada
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  42. If I wanted to stay in England,I suppose I’d have to apply to the Government with the right form.I see no reason why you cannot do the same.They should allow foreign residents first crack at the bat.
    Remember that for every door that closes another always opens.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Good afternoon, dear Tina,
      do you know the other museums Renzo Piano built? But actually we like this one in Oslo most. He has a feeling for art and knows pretty well how to work with the light. We like also that he built with a classical Scandinavian material, the wood.
      All the best to you 🙂 and thanks a lot for commenting
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  43. Excellent photographs of magnificent architecture. I look forward to the sequel!
    I am deeply saddened to learn of your anxieties caused by the Brexit situation. I am ashamed you should be put in this position. Diversity and integration have long been fundamental pillars of our society. We, who happen to have been born English, are not a divinely chosen elite. We are all brothers and sisters within the human race and we need each other.
    I believe the underlying problem has little if anything to do with race per se. It stems from a naive attempt to identify demarcation lines to control immigration. But once such lines have been established a fissure created. Attitudes can quickly become polarized and poisoned.
    The issue is exacerbated by the popular press and social media. Whilst the latter provide excellent communication facilities, unfortunately they also encourage the expression of instant and undigested opinions – as demonstrated by the most powerful leader in the Western World.
    Fear of what might happen is almost invariably worse than the actual event. I have to believe that calm and common sense will ultimately prevail. Surely we have learned something from twentieth century history!
    Please try to ride out the current storm. We need you and others like you.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Dear Louis,
      thanks for your commentary 🙂
      We hope that people have learned from history. For us it looks like a step back in history.
      We will see what will happen, but on the other hand we are looking for alternatives just in case.
      We know quite a lot of people – more English citizens than EU citizens! – who are already leaving England. We will ride out the current as long as it feels comfortable for us here. We have to say that we don’t experience any aggression or even unfriendly behaviour.
      Thanks again and wishing you an easy week
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you very, very much for your kind and wise words 🙂
      Your words are really balm for our Bookfayrie souls.
      With lots and lots of fairy dust from
      Siri 🙂 and 🙂 Selma

      Like

  44. First, the photos in this post are just stunning and the museum building is elegant, sleek and modern. I had to laugh at the lawyer’s offices in the building to pay for it – how clever! Having shown my son the photos he was very taken too and I think we will now be heading to Oslo this summer to see it! I look forward to your post about the interior. Secondly, I am very sad to read about your difficult situation regarding your future residence in the UK, both practically and emotionally. I can definitely empathise with the latter but feel torn as I grew up here and feel both Sweden and UK are my countries (although I never bothered to get a British passport). Uncertain times ahead for you and so many and it is a very odd era we are living in at the moment. Warmest wishes

    Liked by 2 people

    • Good morning, dear Annika,
      this museum is a work of art and it fits that well into its surroundings.
      We don’t really know what will happen with EU citizens living in England. In case we cannot stay any longer we are looking for alternatives. Norway, Germany, Sweden and Denmark are countries we have a look at. But we keep cool and wait and see.
      “We could well be the privileged modern refugees” Siri said lately.
      With warm wishes from Norway, tomorrow we are back home in North Norfolk again
      Love
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

  45. Love the pictures, what a beautiful building!

    Do you really think you’ll have to leave England? Mrs May keeps saying she’s going to make sure people like yourselves will be able to stay. She also said she’ll make sure people like us will be able to stay in France! Not sure if she can control that, but we certainly hope so.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Good evening, dear Jude,
      it all depends on the negotiations with the EU. We suppose nobody can really foresee the outcome.
      But it’s not only question if we legally are allowed to stay in England, it’s a question if we want to under those political circumstances. There are many countries we could go with a more liberal attitude and where the populism has no chance – f.e. like Norway, Germany, Denmark.
      I don’t think that Mrs May has the a power to control the negatiations. The UK is not such an important trading partner for Germany etc. And then there is this connection to the US, we don’t think that will help.
      We will see. But if you look around there are countries drifting to the extreme right and where the populism is winning like France and the US, a little less in England, and there are the countries without a danger of a winning populism.
      We hope that everything will turn out well for you and especially that Le Pen will not win in France. We keep our fingers crossed for you. But actually we believe “All Shall Be Well”.
      With lots of love and don’t worry
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

    • Hello Klaus, and many apologies for taking so long to reply. I can see your point about whether you will want to remain after Brexit happens. We certainly don’t want to be forced to return to England, having made our home in France for over twelve years. I also hope le Pen doesn’t win here. I also wonder if there is a single politician one can trust!! Then there is dear old Donald – president of the US! The mind boggles!! I also hope very much for you and the Fab Four that all will be well, and you will find a happy place. Hugs to you all, and keep in touch😘😊🙃🙆

      Liked by 1 person

    • Actually we are quite positive.
      We hope that le Pen will not make it. We keep our fingers crossed for you and us.
      Don’t worry,”All Shall Be Well”
      With lots of love
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  46. I guess that book title sounds like your notions of the future right now! It must be strange, but then it’s pretty strange over here, too, not knowing what’s going to happen.
    Your photos of Piano’s architecture are stunning! They are beautifully composed and colored, very very nice! I’m glad you enjoyed the museum – it is such a good feeling, seeing a good show and being inspired.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you very much for your commentary 🙂
      Our motto is right now: wait and see.
      Great that you like Dina’s photos of Piano’s work. Yes, we enjoyed the museum very much – the building as well as the exhibition. It was an inspiration and we talked and talked after our visit getting many ideas.
      Have a happy week
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

    • Guten Morgen, lieber Ernst,
      wahrscheinlich sind wir Verdränger, aber wir nehmen es leicht und wo immer wir landen oder bleiben werden, das wird schon recht sein. Wir schauen uns gerade für den Fall der Fälle nach Alternativen um – auch spannend.
      Ja, Piano’s Museum ist toll. Er hat ebenfalls eins bei Basel gebaut. Kennst du das Museum Fondation Beyeler?
      Wir sind Piano-Fans, aber darüber noch mehr in der nächsten Post.
      Wir wünschen dir eine schöne Woche
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

    • Ihr macht das schon richtig, sich umsehen in der Welt schadet nicht, ist sicher spannend und kann euch allenfalls sehr behilflich sein. Das Beyeler Museum Basel besuchte ich auch schon und auch hier ist Pianis Bau sehr schön und speziell. Auch euch ‘Vieren’ eine schöne Woche. 🙂
      Ernst

      Liked by 2 people

    • Es könnte sein, dass jetzt eine völlig neue Phase bei uns beginnt: Nach 35 Jahren Landleben in großartiger Natur nun wieder Stadtleben mit dem Genuss von Kultur. Wir werden sehe, auf jeden Fall ist es aufregend, sehr! Und so durch die Gegend zu reisen und zu schauen, wo es uns gefallen könnte, genießen wir auch.
      Mit lieben Grüßen gerade noch aus Norwegen, morgen sind wir wieder zu Hause,
      The Fab Four of Cley 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  47. The architecture is astonishing! I was enthralled with these photos. And as for what is transpiring in this world it sickens my spirit to see the extent of viciousness, greed, corruption, and people who believe they have the right to dictate to others. I’ve been pulled back quite recently by the One who Guides me, telling me to shut that door to the world and to only focus on what I have created in my small corner of the world and to keep on living in Love. That, my Love, will contribute to the Greater Good of this world. I do not argue nor to I ignore this Guidance I know so well. And so, I have pulled back to redirect myself in the direction I know best … LOVE. That is not to say I am ignorant of what is going on. I pray only the best outcome for you. What is happening to you and to so many others is so so so wrong. Much Love to you this day!!! ❤ ❤ ❤

    Liked by 2 people

    • Good morning, dear Amy Rose,
      thank you so much for your kind words 🙂
      We have had an anchorage in Norwich, Julian of Norwich, who was the first lady in England publishing a book. Her motto was “All Shall Be Well” and we are following her saying.
      Well, isoation was always the beginning of a downfall in history. But we hope for the best and look around for the best options for the worst case.
      With lots of love from the airport – we are flying home
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 3 people

    • I am truly sorry for your circumstances. All of any us can do is hope for the best and keep doing our very best as well so as not to cave into the insanity of this world. I agree with you fully that isolation is the point of no return and it heralds a downfall. Not too much is based on Truth in this world, and the little bit of Truth there is most likely is twisted according to someone’s version of Truth. Don’t bend to the darkness of this world but keep on shining and stay focused and founded in Love. I don’t know about you but I truly am relieved I have lived the majority of my Life here on this earth at this time of history. I look forward in going “Home”. Much Love to you and BIG (((HUGS))) Amy ❤

      Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Thomas
      thanks a lot – und vielen Dank, dass du dir die Mühe machtest, Englisch zu schreiben.
      Prima, dass dir Dinas Fotos gefallen 🙂
      Take care
      cheers
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

  48. Dearest ❤ Regrettfully I have to inform you that Oslo is no longer the most expensive city to live in 😦 We have been beaten by Singapore. We have now ended up in 13th place. What a tragedy 😀 Anyway, the exhibition by Murakami was amazing. The photoes taken were amazing. Dina is such a clever photographer and she never ceases to amaze me with what she is able to make out of a dreary, foggy day. Sorry to see you go, dearest and I hope to see you both soon ❤ ❤ ❤

    Liked by 2 people

  49. Hurrah! Today in the morning we got 7777 followers 🙂
    Thank you all!
    Seven is a very special number. It’s not only Dina’s lucky number but is seen as a holy number because it combines the divine number 3 with the earthly number 4. It’s the number of time and so the number of changes as well: the 7 days of the week. Rudolf Steiner and the Anthroposophists see the 7 as governing the changes in the human life:
    With 7 years you loose your first teeth
    With 14 men became fertile
    Up to 21 you grow higher
    Up to 28 you grow bigger
    With 35 you reach your highest power
    This power stays up to 42
    and if you are lucky you got wise with 70
    Well, these were Steiner’s ideas …
    Beside this we know the 7 arts, the 7 wonders of the world, the 7 sacraments, the 7 virtues, the 7 sins, the 7 planets, the 7 metalls and the Menora – the candleholder with 7 arms. Oh dear, 7 is everywhere to find – not in our blog only 😉
    Anyway, we are happy about our 7777 followers 🙂
    The Fab Four of Cley

    Liked by 1 person

  50. I have not read the book, The Meaning of the Nonsense of the Meaning, but I do believe that human beings are meaning making machines and most of the meaning being made is nonsense. I enjoyed the photos. Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Yes, we think so too, people are meaning producing machines because it’s impossible living without a meaning – even the Nihilsts were producing a meaning,
      Thanks for commenting.
      All the best
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Thorsaurus,
      we like your idea that people are art brushed on the canvas of the world. Although on the other hand we think that nature and art are different categories. Above we wrote about Hegel’s aethetics which made a clear difference between the beauty of nature and the beauty of art – seeing art as something produced by people.
      Thank you very much for commenting. Have an easy weekend
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 3 people

  51. Interesting post and awesome pictures. However the most important thing are the comments. It looks Brexit is a huge move which can cause a lot of different problems not only in UK and Europe but even around the World. People are worried. All the best to you in so unpredictable time.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Good morning, dear Alexander,
      we are also happy and amazed about all the commentaries. Brexit is a topic which touches a lot of people. And we agree it will have quite an impact worldwide. It expresses a dangerous tendency of the rise of populism, of isolation and hatred.
      Thanks for commenting 🙂
      Wishing you a happy weekend
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 3 people

    • Unfortunately, populism is a mainstream in many countries among the politicians. Mostly people cannot separate the wheat from the chaff this is why we have so many populists in the head of countries. They know what people want to hear and they promise to do so. However it never happens.
      But we have to be an optimistic and look for positive things in any circumstances.
      Have a nice weekend! 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

    • We even see it more optimistic, we wouldn’t say that populism is mainstream but it’s too strong. We have to watch it that it will not getting mainsream.
      Have a happy weekend as well
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 3 people

  52. Wenn ich mal ein Haus bauen wollte, würde ich meine Freundin Claudia, die Architektin fragen, sie hatte damals schon immer 15 Punkte in Mathe…
    Ich bin aber nicht sicher, ob sie jetzt die Gebäude baut, die sie sich früher, als wir noch kleine Mädchen waren, erträumt hatte…
    Schade eigentlich!
    Dankeschön für diesen wundervollen Blogbeitrag, wenn England euch nicht mehr will und Oslo zu teuer ist, tja, vielleicht müsst ihr nach Deutschland…
    Und ich dachte schon, wir müssten uns langsam nach einer Hütte in Kanada umschauen und schon einmal das Geld für die Flugtickets zuhause haben, für alle Fälle…
    Momentan kann ich nicht gut denken…wie gesagt, die Wörter sausen durch das Hirn und kommen mir sooooooo komisch vor…
    Herzliche Grüße von Pia, Klavier üben sollte ich auch mal wieder…die Zeit ist immer zu wenig….

    Liked by 3 people

    • Hallihallo, liebe Pia,
      naja, wir bleiben cool und schauen erst einmal. Wir haben ja eine große Auswahl. Neben Deutschland wäre auch z.B. Dänemark attraktiv. In Kanada lebten wir ja ein paar Jahre. Es gefiel uns sehr dort, aber irgendwie fühlen wir uns europäisch und würden deswegen lieber in Europa bleiben. Aber wir sehen das noch lange nicht, dass wir gehen müssen. Wir schauen uns nur einmal “for the worst case” um.
      Schönes Wochenende, liebe Grüße
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

  53. Ich finde die Architektur sieht sehr einladend aus und was Ihr darüber schreibt, macht neugierig. Nach Oslo muss ich irgendwann auch nochmal reisen.
    Es tut mir sehr leid, dass auch Ihr das Gefühl habt, Ihr müsst Euch nach Alternativen umschauen. Schon seltsam, wie sich die Welt verändert hat. Vor zwei Jahren hätte ich das noch nicht für möglich gehalten. Hoffen wir, das bald wieder etwas mehr Besinnung einkehrt. Liebe Grüße an Euch, Peggy

    Liked by 3 people

    • Guten Morgen, liebe Peggy,
      schön von dir zu lesen.
      Ja, vor zwei Jahren hätten wir uns ein Brexit-Szenario auch nicht vorstellen können. Es ist ja für uns immer noch schwer, da wir bislang gar nichts von der veränderten Situation spüren. Das liegt natürlich auch daran, dass wir nicht arbeiten und fast alle hier nicht arbeiten und die meisten auch nie arbeiten mussten. In dieser Umgebung bekommt man vom Brexit bzw. den Hass auf EU-Bürgern nichts mit. Aber klar, das ist nicht unbedingt repräsentativ für England, dennoch meinen wir (naiv?), dass wir hier weiter wie bislang leben könnten, wenn wir wollten. Und vor einem Umzug würde uns grauen.
      Auf der anderen Seite hat die ganze Situation die Frage bei uns aufgeworfen, ob wir weiterhin auf dem Land, fern ab in der Natur, leben wollen. Da gibt es eine Seite in uns, die sagt, die Zeit ist vorbei, jetzt ist wieder Kultur und ein Leben in der Stadt dran – wir wohnten doch immerhin schon einmal in NYC und Montreal. Tja, wer die Wahl hat, hat die Qual. Es gibt einige attraktive Länder und Städte, in die wir ziehen könnten. So gucken wir uns jetzt ein wenig um.
      Dir wünschen wir alles Gute für deinen Umzug. Wir können dir ja dann von Merry Ol’ England berichten 😉
      Mit lieben Grüßen vom kleinen Dorf am großen Meer
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 3 people

    • Ein Umzug ist eigentlich nie besonders angenehm. Irgendwo habe ich gelesen, dass es auf der Liste der unangenehmen Erfahrungen auf Platz 2 nach der Scheidung steht. Ich weiß nicht, wie repräsentativ die Umfrage war, die dem Artikel zugrunde lag, aber nachvollziehbar ist das. Man sagt ja auch nicht umsonst “dreimal umgezogen ist wie einmal abgebrannt ” 😉 Zieht Ihr denn auch Deutschland in Betracht oder nur die angelsächsische Welt? Die USA pflegen ja zur Zeit auch nicht gerade eine Willkommenskultur. Naja, vielleicht wendet sich ja auch alles bald wieder zum Besseren. Liebe Grüße, Peggy

      Liked by 1 person

    • Guten Morgen, liebe Peggy,
      ja, wir ziehen auch Deutschland in Betracht, da wir Deutschland für politisch sehr stabil halten. Wir sehen dort keine Gefahr, dass der Populismus Überhand nimmt. Uns ist’s eigentlich egal, wo wir hinziehen, wir haben ja eine große Auswahl. Es muss eben rundum angenehm dort sein sowohl politisch als auch von der Landschaft her und das Klima sollte nicht zu warm sein. Aber z.Zt. sieht es so aus, dass wir uns hier überhaupt keine Sorgen machen brauchen.
      Umzug, fürchterlich! Das Problem ist, dass wir Büchersammler sind. Unsere Sammlung umfasst so etwa 20.000 Bücher und die sind schwer und nehmen auch einigen Platz in Anspruch. Das wäre auch bei einem Umzug wichtig: Das neue Haus müsste Platz für soviel Bücher haben. Wir erfeuen uns an unserer Sammlung, die jedoch zugleich ein großes Handicap ist.
      Mit lieben Grüßen von Nord Norfolk
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

    • Wir halten gaaaaaanz fest Daumen und Flügelchen für den kleinen Explorer, dass er bei Schulquiz bestens abschneidet.
      Mit feinstem Feenhauch von
      Siri 🙂 und 🙂 Selma, die fröhlichen Buchfeen

      Liked by 2 people

  54. Unglaublich tolle Bilder. Wir waren im letzten Jahr während einer Minikreuzfahrt für 4 Stunden (leider nur) in Oslo. Tolle Stadt und das Einlaufen des Schiffes, vorbei an den Fjorden, einfach unbeschreiblich. Die Landschaft Norwegens strahlt solch eine Ruhe aus, wir haben uns in das Land verliebt und kommen irgendwann mal wieder.

    LG

    Liked by 3 people

  55. Hi Dina,
    Look at all these comments and likes! Congratulations on building an engaged community! Thanks for liking my articles at Reflections, but I haven’t blogged there in almost two years. I’d love for you to see the over 600 articles I have at my new blog MostlyBlogging.com. That’s where I blog now.
    Janice

    Liked by 2 people

  56. It’s no longer possible to come here simply to admire your artistry. I understand your dilemma. I was embarrassed for my Polish family, working so hard in Norfolk to make a living. It’s a relatively privileged area and they have made good friends and integrated well there. You are lucky to be able to choose. I hope that there are enough decent minded people here to persuade you to stay but I will understand if you don’t. The more distance I can put between us and Trump and all that he stands for the better. But I don’t have any influence.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Hi, dear Jo,
      isn’t it a pity that we don’t have much influence?
      We agree, as further away from Trump as better. Well, actually as further away from all those populist like Michael Farage – who is as vain as Trump – Marine le Pen, Wilders & Co.
      We will live here as long as it feels comfortable for us. If this would change we have quite a choice where to go. We just keep our eyes open for possibilities for the worst case – there is actually Norway still on our list, like Germany and Denmark f.e.
      Thank you very much for liking our post
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 3 people

  57. Dear Klausbernd,

    Angelica and may have to face the same problem from another angle. An Englishman born of a Norwegian mother l live in Spain with my German partner. As yet I don’t know what my choices will be, but I did make a choice to live in Spain fourteen years ago. In fact, I only just returned from England after not visiting in more than ten years. That visit only made me more determined to stay in Spain.

    As Angelica is German, and we are registered as partners in a ciivil union under Spanish law, perhaps nothing will change.

    The Brexit referendum, which was just a cynical election ploy by Cameron, has thrown many of us into uncertainty. It seems ridiculous and unjust that so many of us who have made decisions based on the belief the UK would remain in the EU should have our lives and futures thrown into turmoil by a vote so many of us were not even able to take part in. Having been resident in Spain for over twelve years I was disenfranchised.

    Come to Andalusia, it’s lovely all year round, but not at the moment.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Bryan,
      GREAT! We would like Andalusia, but don’t like sunshine all the year round. We are rather looking North. Norway is still not deleted from our list, Denmark is there as well, and the most southern place we could imagine to live is Germany.
      On the other hand we just look around for the worst case. Actually we love living at the North Norfolk coast.
      We wait and see …
      But coming back to Andalusia, we really like Andalusia and we like Spain. A problem would be to learn Spanish.
      Well, let’s keep our fingers crossed that all will be well for us.
      Wishing you a happy Sunday
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Rabirius,
      by the way are you Rabirius the poet or Rabirius the polititian? 😉
      Anyway thanks for commenting 🙂
      Wishing you a happy week
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  58. @ Siri und Selma
    Danke, Ihr Lieben, für den Feenhauch und die damit verbundene Magie. Hoffentlich hilft’s und hoffentlich bewahrheitet sich das Sprichwort nicht! Aber wenn ich mir die Reaktionen sehr vieler Menschen hierzulande betrachte, dann möchte ich das – leider – bezweifeln. Und seit dem Wahlsieg unseres “Clowns in Chief” denke ich auch immer an ein anderes Sprichwort: nur die dümmsten Kaelber wählen sich ihren Schlächter selber. Und da frage ich mich: wie dumm muss man eigentlich sein, um diesen Mann für gut zu halten. Da fängt man doch an, an der Menschheit zu zweifeln.
    Nochmals danke, und ganz liebe Grüße, auch an die liebe Dina und den Master,
    Euer Pit

    Liked by 2 people

    • Hallihallo, lieber Pit,
      naja, wir beiden Buchfeen strengen uns zumindest an – and you never know …
      Wir Buchfeen verzweifeln auch bisweilen an der Menschheit, klar, nicht an jeden einzelnen, aber an der Masse. Aber wir sind eh allergisch gegen Massen. Menschenmassen haben doch häufig etwas Bedrohliches.
      Und sollen wir dir ein Geheimnis verraten? Dina und Masterchen sind eh elitäre Individualisten – hoffentlich lesen die das jetzt nicht – und haben deswegen mit allen Massenphänomen nichts am Hut. Darüber sind wir so froh! 🙂 🙂
      Mit ganz viel Feenhauch von Siri 🙂 und Selma 🙂
      auch für Mary
      Mach’s gut und Kopf hoch

      Liked by 1 person

    • Hallo Ihr beiden Buchfeen,
      dass Dina und der Master (echte) Individualisten sind, das war mir ja laengst bekannt. Aber “elitaer”? Wenn, dann aber nur im guten Sinne!
      Macht’s gut,
      Pit

      Liked by 3 people

  59. Love all of the comments….quite an eye opener politically….from an artists and photographers viewpoint….I love the captures…beautifully done capturing the elegance of the architecture…stunning. My best to you as this situation continues to unfold!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Good morning, dear Kirt,
      thank you very much for commenting.
      We love all this communication on our blog very much. We learn a lot from the different standpoints.
      Wishing you an easy week
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

    • Dear Dunelight
      isn’t it amazing that the people quite often voted their downfall in history?
      But we have some hope left that those following the populist ideas are seeing what they are really doing and change.
      Thanks a lot and have an easy week
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

    • Well, then you know what it is all about.
      About half the population think it’s the downfall of England. You see this already, many educated people leave the country as well as the big companies, the Pound Sterling is that much down as it has never been before and the inflation is rising.
      We will see what result of the negotiatings with the EU will be.
      All the best
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  60. I can certainly understand your worries. Yet, nobody knows how Brexit will influence life for so many, and in particular Europeans living in Great Britain. Hopefully you will find a way that will work for you, one way or another. As to the Astrid Fernley Museum, that is quite an amazing building, and so beautifully captured. I haven’t seen it yet, but your photos makes me want to go next time I visit Oslo. Finally I am a huge fan of Haruki Murakami, but I have not heard about The Meaning of the Nonsense of the Meaning. I will have to check it out. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • Good morning, dear Otto,
      the book “The Meaning of the Nonsense of the Meaning” is not by the writer Haruki Murakami but by the artist Takashi Murakami. Unfortunately we haven’t read it yet.
      We are fans of Haruki Murakami’s books as well and we love the art of Takashi Murakami very much too. Murakami seems to be a common name in Japan.
      Thanks for commenting and all the best from the sunny sea
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  61. Your photos are exquisite and I understand your concern. We are leaving soon for Eastern Europe. I wonder if they will let us back in when we return? My friend whose husband has cancer, cancelled her two month trip to Europe, because, although she is a US citizen, she was born in Iran, raised in Japan, and her husband is German. She is afraid the US will not let them back in. So they cannot travel abroad before he dies.
    I fear the world is entering dangerous times.

    Liked by 1 person

  62. The museum is so appealing. I’m eager to see how the exhibits were arranged inside. It reminds me of one of my favorite museums: the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas. It’s also beautifully designed to fit into the surrounding landscape rather than being intrusive. I’ll be going back there this summer, as they are holding an exhibit of Chihuly’s glassworks. I’ve never seen any in person, and am looking forward to it.

    Coincidentally, I’m reading a book that might interest you: Absolutely on Music ~ Conversations with Seiji Ozawa by Haruki Murakami. It’s a record of the two men’s conversations on music, writing, and much else over a period of two years. It’s truly a delight.

    Like

  63. Pingback: Let’s go inside | The World according to Dina

    • You are absolutely right, Norway is horribly expensive, unbelievable. But the pople earn much more than in most of the other countries, it’s a bit like in Switzerland.
      Dina is Norwegian and our Master knows Norway up to Cape North, so we feel very much at home there. And it’s not only the grand nature it’s the cosyness of the Norwegian houses as well that makes Norway so lovely.
      Thanks for commenting 🙂
      All the best
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • Hi, dear Lynne
      thanks for commenting.
      There are more armchair travel adventures to come …
      With warm greetings from the cold sea
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Like

  64. I think this is a beautiful building! So cool! Sorry to hear that the living position for you hasn’t been easy at all! Good luck in the near future! xxx

    Liked by 1 person

  65. Wow! The architecture of the building, very clearly coming out in your excellent pictures Dina, is really interesting. The shape, the brave mixture of materials and how it all ‘fits’ into its surrounding landscape/cityscape is fascinating.

    Liked by 1 person

  66. I hope you won’t need to leave your lovely Cley but perhaps I could interest you in NZ as a safe haven. Unfortunately the super rich may have beaten the rest of the world to the supposedly safe haven of NZ. http://www.news.com.au/technology/innovation/silicon-valleys-super-rich-are-eyeing-new-zealand-for-escape-plans/news-story/d3edc3233b30ef381b66414d2c7b05a7 But the sad truth is that even in far away places like NZ, none of is immune to political events in the US or the UK, or China or Russia….. I feel that this Swahili proverb often applies “When elephants fight the grass (reeds) gets hurt”

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you very much 🙂 It’s very kind of you.
      We feel European and therefore we would like to stay in Europe. Germany and Norway are quite safe and stable countries. In the worst case we would go to there. We stayed for many years outside Europe but in the end we felt like going back to good old Europe as we feel at home there.
      We wish you a great weekend and thanks again thinking about our dilemma
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 2 people

  67. There is always Hong Kong for you to come and enjoy ~ the fayries will love the ferries, and HK Islands are quiet and natural 🙂 The spirit of the architecture you capture is impressive, as I think photographing buildings is one of the most difficult types of photography for me ~ beautifully done. And what makes this even more special, is that the building itself is art, and there is not a truer comment than what you say “art makes better people“

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Dalo,
      thank you so much for thinking of an alternative for us. We have never been to Hon Kong and we are quite amazed about what you write about the islands there. But as we wrote above to Gallivanta we feel European, yes, we love Europe. We stayed for more than ten years outside Europe but in the end we felt homesick for Europe. On the other hand we would really like to have a look at those island. You made us curious.
      Thank you for liking Dina’s photos. To take a picture of architecture is tricky but if you like the building you find a way.
      We wish you a relaxing weekend
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

  68. tusen takk! danke! merci! thanx! I often miss Norway, in general and Oslo, in particular… ❤ and I'm a Murakami fan, too – both the artist and the writer… 🙂 alles gute – my very best to you all… cheers! Mélanie Bedos-Nicolas

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dear Mélanie,
      we are like you: fans of both Murakamis.
      We can well understand that you miss Norway. It is a great country, not only the nature but the people and culture too!
      Thanks a lot for commenting 🙂
      Wishing you a happy day
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Like

    • Thank you very VERY much!
      We have the same interest as you. We are interested in everything Scandinavian and even further North like Greenland and the High Arctic. Dina is Norwegian and our dear Master studied Nordic culture and languages and lived in Sweden and Finland and even our beloved Bookfayries Siri and Selma love the Trolls. So our connection to the North is quite strong.
      With lots of love and have a happy weekend
      The Fab Four of Cley

      Liked by 1 person

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